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UNIT 16. RESPONSIBLE
TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS
Picture source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cycle_rickshaw_in_Hanoi....
Unit outline
Objectives
By the end of this unit, participants will be able to:
• Understand the importance and benefits of...
TOPIC 1. TOURS & TRAVEL SECTOR OVERVIEW
& THE NEED FOR RESPONSIBLE TOURISM
RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS
Picture ...
Composition of the tours and travel sector
Transport operators
Attractions
Picture sources:
http://www.geograph.org.uk/pho...
Key sector figures
12%
GLOBAL1 VIETNAM2
Outbound
tour operator
arrivals
domestic-market
tour operators
registered
tour gui...
Why tours are particularly important to the
international market in Vietnam
Picture sources:
http://thethaovanhoa.vn/xa-ho...
The power and influence of tour operators
TOUR
OPERATOR
ACCOMMODATION
RESTAURANTS
TRANSPORT
ATTRACTIONS
TOUR GUIDES
Promot...
The tour operator multiplier effect:
A key to responsible tourism 1/2
1 tour
operator
30 tours /
year
25 guests /
tour
750...
The tour operator multiplier effect:
A key to responsible tourism 2/2
180 tour
operators
(1%)
30 tours /
year
25 guests /
...
Potential negative impacts of
unsustainable practices
Economic
leakage
Restricted
economic
development
Social values
and c...
How responsible tourism offers tour operators
a sustainable pathway forward
Ensures natural
resources are used
optimally
P...
Why responsible tourism also makes good
business sense
Revenue
growth
Cost
savings
Access to
capital
Better
brand
Happier
...
Consumer’s are also demanding
responsible travel…
58%
47%
93%of Conde Nast Travellers think
travel companies should be
res...
…and are willing to pay to go green
50%
of TripAdvisor travellers
are willing to spend
more money to stay at
an eco-friend...
The Responsible Travel Club (Hanoi) and the
Responsible Travel Group (Hue) 1/2
• 2 informal associations of travel agencie...
Examples of RTC and RTG initiatives 2/2
Responsible travel
organisations in Vietnam:
RTC in Hanoi
RTG in Hue
Interventions...
The key elements of responsible tour operation
Responsible tourism
internal management
Responsible tourism
products
Respon...
TOPIC 2. IMPLEMENTING RESPONSIBLE
TOURISM IN INTERNAL MANAGEMENT
RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS
Picture source:
ht...
Key components of responsible tourism in
internal management
A. Implement
responsible
practices in the
workplace
B. Create...
A. Implement responsible practices in the
workplace
Defining responsible employment
• Implementing labour
standards that promote
opportunities for women
and men to obtain
dec...
Provide industry accepted employment
benefits
Annual leave and
public holidays
Absence for military or
public service duti...
Provide incentives and bonuses
Examples of incentives and
bonuses:
• Staff retreat: sponsored
reward for all staff (often
...
Provide an adequate work space
Providing an adequate
work space refers to:
• Employers providing
safe and hygienic
working...
The 2 main types of workplace training
1. Induction training
2. Ongoing skills training
Provide an induction training programme
• Overview of job, timescales and
expectations
• Overview of workplace
• Introduct...
Ongoing skills training
• Formal training in skills capacity
related to the occupation and
needs of the employee
• Part of...
Key steps in developing a skills training
programme using A-D-D-I-E
Design
Develop
Implement
Evaluate
Analyse
Learning pro...
B. Create a Green Office
Considerations for reducing energy
consumption in the office
Natural
light
Ventilation
Type of
lights
Computer
power useOt...
Office energy audit questions
Types Usage External factors
• Is office equipment the most energy
efficient models (general...
Considerations for reducing energy
consumption from transport
Vehicle type
Tyre
pressure
Maintenance
Others:
- Staff trans...
Vehicles and transportation energy audit
questions
Types Usage External factors
• Are company vehicles most fuel
efficient...
Considerations for minimising waste in the
office
Picture sources:
http://www.buyecogreen.com.au/ecocern-a4-brown-paper-10...
Waste audit questions: Office
• Can all copiers/printers/faxes print double sided?
• Are all computers and printers defaul...
Calculating your volume of waste
Number of
containers
per month
Volume
per
container
(L)
12
(months)
Average
volume (L)
of...
Costing your volume of waste
Image sources:
http://highlanderimages.blogspot.com/2011/12/rubbish-man.html
http://labspace....
C. Implement policies on responsible tourism
and build capacity to achieve them
The function of company policies in
responsible tourism
• Links company vision and values
to day-to-day operations
• Commu...
Company benefits of having responsible
tourism policies
• Helps defend a company from legal disputes

• Demonstrates comp...
Common types of capacity building used by
companies to train staff
• Provision of access to repositories of information
an...
TOPIC 3. DEVELOPING
RESPONSIBLE TOURISM PRODUCTS
RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS
Picture source:
Pixabay, www.pixab...
Key components in developing responsible
tourism products
A.
Understanding
responsible
tourism
products
B. Developing
tour...
A. Understanding responsible tourism products
Defining tourism products
NARROW DEFINITION
What the tourist buys
WIDER DEFINITION
The combination of what the
tourist doe...
Types of tourism products
Natural tourism products
Man-made tourism
products
Types of tourism products in Vietnam
Others?
Picture sources:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/barbararich/96982409/; http://w...
Characteristics of responsible tourism products
• Responsible tourism products are the goods
and services that form touris...
Examples of responsible tourism products
Responsible tourism
destination
Madagascar – contains a
range of ecological wonde...
B. Developing tourism products that are
commercially viable
The responsible tourism product development
process
RESPONSIBLE TOURISM
PRODUCT PLANNING
•Market analysis
•Product analysi...
Ensuring viable responsible tourism products
by meeting market needs
• Market visitation
volume
• Market size
• Market tre...
SEGMENT TYPE CHARACTERISTICS MOTIVATIONS EXPECTATIONS
Holidayers International
1st timers International
2nd timers +
crowd...
Example of typical tourist market segments and
characteristics in Vietnam
SEGMENT TYPE CHARACTERISTICS MOTIVATIONS EXPECTA...
C. Matching markets with product
development opportunities & objectives
What is tourism product-market matching?
• Connecting the
characteristics,
motivations and
expectations of market
segments...
Product-market matching conceptual diagram
PRODUCT
A
PRODUCT
B
PRODUCT
C
PRODUCT
E
PRODUCT
D
PRODUCT
F
PRODUCT
G
PRODUCT
I...
Which markets would you match
to these products in Vietnam?
Why are these
markets linked
to these
products?
Matching markets and products in Vietnam
Existing products New products
4 key product development options
ExistingmarketsNewmarkets
Market
penetration
Sell more of...
Developing existing tourism products
To
existing
markets
• Strategy: Intensive
promotion of existing
products to current
m...
Developing new tourism products
To
existing
markets
• Strategy: Expand on
products in destination
and promote to existing
...
Market penetration and development:
Vietnam tourism market segment
opportunities
MARKET SEGMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Independent
...
D. Responsible tourism product development
strategy and action planning
Responsible tourism product development
strategy and action plan development process
1. Define the responsible tourism
pro...
1. Define the responsible tourism product
development vision, goals and objectives
• Vision: Reflects the broad aims
and p...
Example of a vision, goals, and objectives in
responsible tourism product development
Example vision statement:
• “To deve...
2. Identify and prioritise responsible
tourism product development ideas
Key considerations include the degree to
which in...
3. Design responsible tourism product
development interventions
• Starting point - review development goals, outputs of
th...
Principles for preparing a responsible tourism
product development strategy
• Emphasise stakeholder involvement
• Based on...
4. Develop the responsible tourism product
development action plan
• Clearly sets out what is
being done, when, by whom,
a...
Guiding principles for securing resources for
implementing action plans
• Use the project action plan as a tool
• Use a jo...
Action plan template
ACTIVITY 1 RESULT TIMING RESPONSIBILITY RESOURCES
Sub-activity 1
Sub-activity 2
Sub-activity 3
Sub-ac...
TOPIC 4. CREATING RESPONSIBLE TOURISM
SUPPLY CHAINS
RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS
Picture source:
http://www.flic...
Key elements in developing responsible
tourism supply chains
A. Understand
the principles of
responsible
tourism supply
ch...
A. Understand the principles of responsible
tourism supply chains
What is a supply chain?
• The system of moving of a
product or service from supplier
to customer
• Results in natural reso...
Picture source:
http://piboonrungroj.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/slide03.jpg
The tourism sector supply chain
Two compelling reasons why we need sustainable
supply chains in tourism
Consumers
expect it You are eroding
your core prod...
Some other good reasons to develop a
sustainable supply chain
• Improved profile / brand
• Improved market access
• Incr...
The function of making tourism supply chains
more sustainable
• Recognises sustainability
goes beyond the company
• Uses t...
Example: Putting responsibility into a
component of a tour operator’s supply chain
TOUROPERATOR
Hotel
Restaurant
Dairy sup...
Example of a simple tour operator supply chain
http://sociologicalimagination.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/tourism.jpg
h...
B. Develop sustainable supply chain policies
and action plans
The benefits of having sustainable supply chain
policy in tourism
• Helps defend a company from legal disputes

• Demonst...
TOPIC 2 TOPIC 3 TOPIC 4
The key steps to developing a sustainable
supply chain
Understand where
you are
Conduct a baseline...
Example of responsible supply chain policy
statement
A1 Tours recognises that our social, economic and environmental impac...
Example of responsible supply chain
procedures
In order to develop a sustainable supply chain, A1 Tours will:
1. Take a le...
Sustainable supply chain action planning
• Sets out the activities and
resources required to support
suppliers to meet sus...
The TOI’s tips for effective sustainable supply
chain action planning
Involve suppliers
incrementally
Plan for different r...
Key steps in developing a sustainable
contracting system
• Develop approach and procedures for implementation
of sustainab...
C. Raise awareness and support suppliers to
meet sustainability targets
The importance of awareness and support in
developing sustainable supply chains
•Develop sustainability
messages
•Communic...
Awareness raising channels relevant to
developing a sustainable tourism supply chain
Meetings and workshops
Gather relevan...
Communicating the new sustainable supply
chain policy: Key information to deliver
Sustainability policy /
Code of Conduct ...
Supporting tourism suppliers through capacity
building
CAPACITY
BUILDING
OPTIONS
Training
Informati
on
resource
s
Mentori
...
The TOI’s recommendations on incentives for
suppliers to meet sustainability goals
• Suppliers need to be convinced
of the...
TOPIC 5. ENSURING RESPONSIBILITY IN
MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS
RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS
Picture source:
Pi...
Key components of responsible marketing and
communications
A. Understand
the role and
importance of
responsible
marketing ...
A. Understand the role and importance of
responsible marketing & communications
Applying principles of responsibility to
marketing and communication
• Respects law and good
practice
• Decent and honest
...
Benefits of responsible tourism marketing and
communication
Creates competitive advantage
Increases value and demand
Incre...
B. Ensure authentic and accurate messages are
communicated
Authenticity in tourism experiences
• Travel to experience something unique or original
• Integrity can relate to a place,...
Examples of inauthentic advertising from
around the world
Picture sources:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-21281...
Commodification of culture
• The manufacturing and selling
of culture for profit
• Response to fulfilling demand
for perce...
Greenwashing
• Knowingly misleading consumers about a product or
service’s environmental practices or benefits for own
gai...
Greenwashing is all around us
but can be hard to spot
Example 1
• A hotel chain claims to be
environmentally friendly beca...
C. Market and communicate practices in
sustainability
Key steps for communicating sustainability:
The “Keep it Real” approach
Understand the market
Identify objectives of
susta...
Step 1. Understand the markets and customise
sustainability messages
• While most consumers care it
does not mean they wil...
Step 2. Identify objectives of sustainability
communications
1. To raise
awareness and
change
behaviour
2. To allow
touris...
Step 3. Develop appropriate messages and
communication channels
• Common mistakes in
communicating messages of
sustainabil...
BEFORE
BOOKING
• Pre-departure
info
BETWEEN
BOOKING &
ARRIVAL
• Tourism
product
sustainability
areas
DURING THE
VISIT
• Ph...
D. Be guided by visitor feedback
Methods for collecting visitor feedback
A. Surveys B. Focus groups
C. Feedback forms and
comment cards
D. Social media
E. ...
A. Collecting visitor feedback through surveys
• Set of predetermined questions about
specific topics
• Often used to gaug...
B. Collecting visitor feedback through focus
groups
• Open discussion of a small
group of people led by a
moderator
• Gets...
C. Collecting visitor feedback through feedback
forms and comment cards
• Physical, paper cards or forms with
one or more ...
D. Collecting visitor feedback through social
media
• Enable both direct feedback and
feedback on consumer attitudes
and t...
E. Collecting visitor feedback through on the
spot feedback and observation
• Observe what visitors are doing
• Understand...
TOPIC 6. RESPONSIBLE
SUPPORT TO TOURISM DESTINATIONS
RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS
Picture source:
Pixabay, www.p...
Key components of providing responsible
support to tourism destinations
A. Understand
the role and
importance of
supportin...
A. Understand the role and importance of
supporting destinations
What do we mean by supporting
local tourism destinations?
• The provision of assistance
to local communities to
manage the...
The role and benefits of supporting local
tourism destinations
Picture sources: http://pixabay.com/en/together-team-people...
Implementing effective support to local
destinations for sustainable tourism
Develop mechanisms for
responsible tourism
in...
B. Incorporate responsible tourism practices
into interactions with destination communities
Relationships in a tourism code of conduct
LOCAL TOURISM
DESTINATION
Code of
Conduct
Destination
Management
Organisation
(...
Example of a visitor code of conduct 1/2
Source: VNAT, Do’s and Don'ts in Vietnam for Community-based Tourists, VNAT, Viet...
Example of a visitor code of conduct 2/2
Source: VNAT, Do’s and Don'ts in Vietnam for Community-based Tourists, VNAT, Viet...
Communicating codes of conduct to visitors
BEFORE BOOKING
• Destination’s people,
culture and
environment
• Website, socia...
C. Promote sustainable tourism in destinations
Why the tourism private sector has a
responsibility to promote responsible tourism
• The tourism private sector is central...
The power and influence of the tourism private
sector
TOURISM
ENTERPRISE
(hotel, tour
operator,
restaurant,
attraction, et...
3 ways the private sector can influence
sustainable tourism in destinations
1. Engagement
with tourism
authorities
2. Work...
1. Private sector engagement with destination
tourism authorities
A. Participate in
public sector
organised
conferences,
m...
2. Working with like-minded organisations
The tourism private sector can indirectly influence
destination development and ...
Pro-Poor Tourism Project in Quan Ba, Ha Giang
Province, Vietnam
Location Quan Ba District, Ha Giang, Viet Nam
Duration 48 ...
3. Helping raise awareness in local communities
about the importance of sustainable tourism
RAISING
AWARENESS
ABOUT
SUSTAI...
D. Help fund sustainable tourism in
destinations
How the private sector can help finance
sustainable tourism destinations
1.Send business to
heritage sites
2. Help with
bu...
1. Sending business to heritage sites
• In Vietnam market analyses highlight
significance of nature and culture as
key mot...
2. Assisting local organisations to prepare
business plans and funding proposals
What?
• Local organisations working in
su...
3. Partnering, sponsoring or fundraising to
support environmental and social causes
Picture sources:
http://www.itu.int/os...
4. Promoting and gaining customer support in
sustainability activities
• Visitors often learn about
sustainability issues ...
5. Encouraging customers to donate to
sustainability activities
• Encouraging donations means providing ways for customers...
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Unit 16: Responsible Tourism For Tour Operators
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Unit 16: Responsible Tourism For Tour Operators

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Unit 16: Responsible Tourism For Tour Operators

  1. 1. UNIT 16. RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS Picture source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cycle_rickshaw_in_Hanoi.jpg
  2. 2. Unit outline Objectives By the end of this unit, participants will be able to: • Understand the importance and benefits of applying responsible tourism to travel and tour operation in Vietnam • Apply responsible employment policies and strategies • Explain procedures for reducing energy, water and waste • Understand the role of responsible tourism organisational policies and how to implement them • Explain how to develop economically viable responsible tourism products • Understand the steps required to develop a responsible tourism supply chain • Implement responsible tourism marketing and communication • Identify how to support local tourism destinations Topics 1. Overview of tour and travel sector in Vietnam 2. Implementing responsible tourism in internal management 3. Developing responsible tourism products 4. Creating responsible tourism supply chains 5. Ensuring responsibility in marketing and communications 6. Responsible support to tourism destinations
  3. 3. TOPIC 1. TOURS & TRAVEL SECTOR OVERVIEW & THE NEED FOR RESPONSIBLE TOURISM RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS Picture source: http://www.fotopedia.com/items/flickr-4473340424
  4. 4. Composition of the tours and travel sector Transport operators Attractions Picture sources: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1364221; http://www.flickr.com/photos/needoptic/9861409444/; http://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/4399833574/; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Southern_Vectis_coaches_at_Bustival_2010.JPG; http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Victoria_Hoi_An_Hotel_Ressort_und_Spa.jpg; http://www.flickr.com/photos/calflier001/6943300353/
  5. 5. Key sector figures 12% GLOBAL1 VIETNAM2 Outbound tour operator arrivals domestic-market tour operators registered tour guides international-market tour operators800 10,000 17,000 Excludes packages! 1 Tour Operators’ Initiative for Sustainable Tourism Development 2003, Sustainable Tourism: The Tour Operators’ Contribution 2 ESRT 2013, Vietnam Tourism Marketing Strategy To 2020 & Action Plan: 2013-2015 (Proposed), ESRT, Vietnam
  6. 6. Why tours are particularly important to the international market in Vietnam Picture sources: http://thethaovanhoa.vn/xa-hoi/doi-ve-tra-ve-tau-tet-phai-truoc-10-gio-tau-chay-tru-30-gia-ve-n20121202171607247.htm; http://vietnamlandingvisa.blogspot.com/2012/08/frequent-confusion-about-vietnam.html; http://www.tropicalisland.de/vietnam.html; http://www.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/blog/2012/mar/29/talented-students-may-lose-out
  7. 7. The power and influence of tour operators TOUR OPERATOR ACCOMMODATION RESTAURANTS TRANSPORT ATTRACTIONS TOUR GUIDES Promotes and / or provides trade by including in packages or recommending to guests Engages boat, bus, train, plane and other transport operators to move guests to / at attractions Promotes and / or provides trade to natural and cultural attractions through tours Provides employment within organisation or by contract Promotes and / or provides trade by including in packages or recommending to guests Influence Influence Influence TOURIST
  8. 8. The tour operator multiplier effect: A key to responsible tourism 1/2 1 tour operator 30 tours / year 25 guests / tour 750 responsible travellers / year = 750 stays in green hotels = 750 meals in local restaurants = 750 visitors to sustainable destinations … Typical tour operator:
  9. 9. The tour operator multiplier effect: A key to responsible tourism 2/2 180 tour operators (1%) 30 tours / year 25 guests / tour 135,000 responsible travellers / year and if just 1% of Vietnam’s 18,000 tour operators acted responsibly, we could have 135,000 responsible travel trips in 1 year! Typical tour operator:
  10. 10. Potential negative impacts of unsustainable practices Economic leakage Restricted economic development Social values and cultural conflict Visitor safety and security Friction, distrust and disharmony Destruction of natural environment Depletion of natural resources
  11. 11. How responsible tourism offers tour operators a sustainable pathway forward Ensures natural resources are used optimally Promotes viable and long term economic benefits Promotes conservation of natural heritage Uses strategically effective business practices Builds respect of culture and authenticity
  12. 12. Why responsible tourism also makes good business sense Revenue growth Cost savings Access to capital Better brand Happier staff More attractive destinations Licensed to operate Improved service Ready for regulations Picture sources: Pixabay, www.pixabay.com
  13. 13. Consumer’s are also demanding responsible travel… 58% 47% 93%of Conde Nast Travellers think travel companies should be responsible for protecting the environment of Conde Nast Travellers also say their hotel choice is influenced by the support the hotel gives to the local community 71%of TripAdvisor members planned to make a more eco-friendly choice for their holiday in 2013 compared to 65% in 2012 of Conde Nast Travellers are interested in volunteer vacations, and 98% of past volunteers satisfied with their experience 1 Source: PR News Wire 2011, “Conde Nast Traveller Announces Winners of the 2011 World Savers Awards”, http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/conde-nast-traveler-announces-winners-of-the-2011-world-savers-awards-127886823.html; CondeNast Traveller, “Readers’ Poll.” Feb 2009; 2 Source: TripAdvisor 2012, TripAdvisor survey reveals travellers growing greener, TripAdvisor, Available [online]: http://www.multivu.com/mnr/49260-tripadvisor-eco-friendly-travel-survey-voluntourism-go-green, Downloaded: 07/03/2014
  14. 14. …and are willing to pay to go green 50% of TripAdvisor travellers are willing to spend more money to stay at an eco-friendly accommodation 75%of TripAdvisor travellers say the economic landscape does not affect their interest in eco-friendly travel choices 23%of TripAdvisor travellers would pay up to $25 additional per night to stay at an eco-friendly accommodation, while 9% would be willing to spend $25-$50 extra Source: TripAdvisor 2012, TripAdvisor survey reveals travellers growing greener, TripAdvisor, Available [online]: http://www.multivu.com/mnr/49260-tripadvisor-eco-friendly-travel-survey-voluntourism-go-green, Downloaded: 07/03/2014
  15. 15. The Responsible Travel Club (Hanoi) and the Responsible Travel Group (Hue) 1/2 • 2 informal associations of travel agencies, NGOs and individuals • Aim to build and practice responsible travel for sustainable growth in all regions of Vietnam • Philosophy: – Community support – Business collaboration – Environment conservation & protection – Cultural preservation
  16. 16. Examples of RTC and RTG initiatives 2/2 Responsible travel organisations in Vietnam: RTC in Hanoi RTG in Hue Interventions: Knowledge-sharing Capacity building and skills training Compilation and distribution of sustainable best practice information Responsible tourism projects: Clean-up campaigns Community development projects Responsible tourism excursions to: Enhance local economic opportunities Revitalise threatened cultures Provide a genuine and memorable experience for visitors Picture sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism_in_Belize http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Madagascar_baobab.JPG http://www.fotopedia.com/items/flickr-6054914564 http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Recreational_cyclists_take_breaks_while_driving_on_a_bicycle_tour.jpg
  17. 17. The key elements of responsible tour operation Responsible tourism internal management Responsible tourism products Responsible tourism supply chains Responsible marketing & communications Responsible support to tourism destinations TOPIC 2 TOPIC 3 TOPIC 4 TOPIC 5 TOPIC 6
  18. 18. TOPIC 2. IMPLEMENTING RESPONSIBLE TOURISM IN INTERNAL MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS Picture source: https://creativecommons.org/tag/oer/page/5
  19. 19. Key components of responsible tourism in internal management A. Implement responsible practices in the workplace B. Create a Green Office C. Implement policies on responsible tourism and build capacity to achieve them
  20. 20. A. Implement responsible practices in the workplace
  21. 21. Defining responsible employment • Implementing labour standards that promote opportunities for women and men to obtain decent and productive work in conditions of freedom, equity, security and dignity (ILO) • Ensures economic growth provides benefits for all • Balances employer and employee benefits Labor standards Equal opportunity Decent and productive work
  22. 22. Provide industry accepted employment benefits Annual leave and public holidays Absence for military or public service duties Social insurance and leave Sick leave Maternity leave Proper response to accidents at work Pension plans
  23. 23. Provide incentives and bonuses Examples of incentives and bonuses: • Staff retreat: sponsored reward for all staff (often annual) • Paid holiday: awarded to high performing staff (competitively) • Pay bonuses: monetary reward for all staff for their work by the end of the year
  24. 24. Provide an adequate work space Providing an adequate work space refers to: • Employers providing safe and hygienic working conditions; and • Employees following the workplace policies and procedures on health and safety
  25. 25. The 2 main types of workplace training 1. Induction training 2. Ongoing skills training
  26. 26. Provide an induction training programme • Overview of job, timescales and expectations • Overview of workplace • Introduction to other staff • Overview of organisation’s mission, goals, values and philosophy • Expectations in commitment to achieving responsible tourism
  27. 27. Ongoing skills training • Formal training in skills capacity related to the occupation and needs of the employee • Part of a formal organisational training plan that identifies: – Requirements of the training for the company – Current skills of the workforce and needs in the future – Available resources for training – Appropriate approaches for training – Training opportunities
  28. 28. Key steps in developing a skills training programme using A-D-D-I-E Design Develop Implement Evaluate Analyse Learning problem Goals and objectives Audience’s needs Existing knowledge Learning environment Constraints Delivery options Project timeline Instructional Design Strategy Delivery method Training structure and duration Evaluation methodology Create prototype Develop training materials Desktop review Run training pilot Training schedule Print and prepare training material Prepare trainers Notify learners Launch training Collect training evaluation data Review training effectiveness Assess project performance Report performance results
  29. 29. B. Create a Green Office
  30. 30. Considerations for reducing energy consumption in the office Natural light Ventilation Type of lights Computer power useOthers: - Power use of other electrical appliances
  31. 31. Office energy audit questions Types Usage External factors • Is office equipment the most energy efficient models (generally Energy Star)? • Are computers, monitors, printers, copiers and other office equipment turned off when not in use? • Are computers, monitors, printers, copiers and other office equipment set for “sleep” or energy saving mode? • Is equipment recycled or properly disposed of at end of use? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  32. 32. Considerations for reducing energy consumption from transport Vehicle type Tyre pressure Maintenance Others: - Staff transport - Off-site meetings Tinted windows
  33. 33. Vehicles and transportation energy audit questions Types Usage External factors • Are company vehicles most fuel efficient models available for your business’s requirements? • When purchasing a new vehicle is fuel efficiency prioritised? • Are employees encouraged or incentivised for taking public transport or carpooling? • Do company vehicles receive regular maintenance? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  34. 34. Considerations for minimising waste in the office Picture sources: http://www.buyecogreen.com.au/ecocern-a4-brown-paper-100-recycled-105-gsm-ream-500-sheets--p700363 https://www.officemaxcanada.com/en/sites/core/Think_overview.aspx http://blog.stickyinstitute.com/?p=376 http://www.printershoppers.com/printer-buying-guide/ Office equipment
  35. 35. Waste audit questions: Office • Can all copiers/printers/faxes print double sided? • Are all computers and printers default settings set to print double sided? • Is office equipment recycled or properly disposed at end of use? • Does the company send paper invoices? • Does the company send out paper advertisements or promotions? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  36. 36. Calculating your volume of waste Number of containers per month Volume per container (L) 12 (months) Average volume (L) of waste in 1 year Image sources: http://highlanderimages.blogspot.com/2011/12/rubbish-man.html http://nushine.com.au/cleaning-food-hygiene-products/bins-liners/garbage-bin/prod_101.html http://labspace.open.ac.uk/mod/resource/view.php?id=465057 http://www.wmich.edu/registrar/calendars/ Baseline volume of wasteTo convert volume into cubic metres of waste or tonnes of waste: Cubic metres = Total volume of waste (L) / 1,000 Tonnes = Total volume of waste (m3) x 2.29 (approx)
  37. 37. Costing your volume of waste Image sources: http://highlanderimages.blogspot.com/2011/12/rubbish-man.html http://labspace.open.ac.uk/mod/resource/view.php?id=465057 http://www.vietnamspirittravel.com/guide/vietnam_bank_notes.htm Baseline unit cost of waste Average volume of waste per month (m3 or tonnes) Cost of waste collection per month (VND) Unit cost of waste
  38. 38. C. Implement policies on responsible tourism and build capacity to achieve them
  39. 39. The function of company policies in responsible tourism • Links company vision and values to day-to-day operations • Communicate expectations about work performance and boundaries of action • Ensures compliance with relevant laws & regulations and provides a defence against inappropriate actions • Promotes efficiency in operation and reduces need for constant management intervention • Helps achieve sustainable tourism objectives Healthy communities Natural environment Economic vitality SUSTAINABILITY
  40. 40. Company benefits of having responsible tourism policies • Helps defend a company from legal disputes  • Demonstrates company commitment to maintaining a healthy environment, building a happier society and buoyant local economy thereby enhancing the company brand and improving sales and loyalty • Promotes the support of customers to help the company achieve its sustainability objectives • Fosters stability and consistency in decision-making and operational procedures resulting in fewer operational setbacks • Creates stronger and more competitive tourism destinations that have better environments, happier people and stronger local economies for the long term benefit of business, local residents and tourists
  41. 41. Common types of capacity building used by companies to train staff • Provision of access to repositories of information and electronic and print resources • Provision of company guidelines and manuals • Consultation such as coaching / mentoring • Co-ordinating alliances and observing real best practice case studies • Workplace training
  42. 42. TOPIC 3. DEVELOPING RESPONSIBLE TOURISM PRODUCTS RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS Picture source: Pixabay, www.pixabay.com
  43. 43. Key components in developing responsible tourism products A. Understanding responsible tourism products B. Developing tourism products that are commercially viable C. Matching markets with product development opportunities and objectives D. Responsible tourism product development strategy and action planning
  44. 44. A. Understanding responsible tourism products
  45. 45. Defining tourism products NARROW DEFINITION What the tourist buys WIDER DEFINITION The combination of what the tourist does at the destination and the services used
  46. 46. Types of tourism products Natural tourism products Man-made tourism products
  47. 47. Types of tourism products in Vietnam Others? Picture sources: http://www.flickr.com/photos/barbararich/96982409/; http://www.flickr.com/photos/chericbaker/4446189110/; http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthieu-aubry/1242936011; http://www.flickr.com/photos/lintmachine/2386330877/; http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:VietnamCombatArtTheLadiesbyDavidFairringtonCATVI1968.jpg; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%E1%BB%B9_S%C6%A1n; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnamese_cuisine; http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hiking_at_highest_peak_in_Kosova_-_Gjeravica.JPG; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_kayak; http://pixabay.com/en/diver-light-diving-silhouette-sea-108881/; http://www.flickr.com/photos/whltravel/4303957860/; http://www.flickr.com/photos/agapbulusan/2418856362/; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hmong_people
  48. 48. Characteristics of responsible tourism products • Responsible tourism products are the goods and services that form tourism experiences and are specifically designed to be: – Environmentally, socially, culturally and economically sustainable – Educational – Promote local participation
  49. 49. Examples of responsible tourism products Responsible tourism destination Madagascar – contains a range of ecological wonders; Is dedicated to protecting the environment; Offers many sustainable tourism options Responsible tourism attraction Protected areas; Protected cultural heritage sites; A theme park based on a rainforest theme that both educates visitors on sustainability issues and sells local products Responsible tourism accommodation Eco-resorts that have been built and managed according to sustainable tourism principles (e.g. protect the environment, involve and benefit local people) Responsible tourism transportation Renewable energy hybrid vehicles, Bicycle tours; Air travel with carbon offsets Picture sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism_in_Belize http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Madagascar_baobab.JPG http://www.fotopedia.com/items/flickr-6054914564 http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Recreational_cyclists_take_breaks_while_driving_on_a_bicycle_tour.jpg
  50. 50. B. Developing tourism products that are commercially viable
  51. 51. The responsible tourism product development process RESPONSIBLE TOURISM PRODUCT PLANNING •Market analysis •Product analysis •Match markets with products •Product assessment for development STAKEHOLDER CO-ORDINATION AND COLLABORATION •Determine goals and actions •Establish collaborations RESPONSIBLE TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY AND ACTION PLAN •Develop a responsible tourism product development strategy •Develop an implementation action plan
  52. 52. Ensuring viable responsible tourism products by meeting market needs • Market visitation volume • Market size • Market trends and interests Market growth • Reason for travel • Kinds of experiences desired Motivations & needs • Means of travel • Length of stay • Level of flexibility Travel patterns • Level of money spent by visitor types • Value to local development Spend • Greatest interest in the destination • Connect with development objectives Sustainability
  53. 53. SEGMENT TYPE CHARACTERISTICS MOTIVATIONS EXPECTATIONS Holidayers International 1st timers International 2nd timers + crowd avoiders International On holiday Domestic Phuot Domestic Day trippers Domestic
  54. 54. Example of typical tourist market segments and characteristics in Vietnam SEGMENT TYPE CHARACTERISTICS MOTIVATIONS EXPECTATIONS Holidayers International short-haul Traveling in organized groups or with family and friends. Shorter trips, few destinations. Relaxation, entertainment, visiting main attractions, shopping. Superior food and accommodation, Mixing businesses with pleasure International short-haul Individual and independent business travellers adding some tourism activities to their trip. Entertainment, visiting main attractions, relaxation. Quality services and products. Ease of travel. 1st timers International long-haul Individual or group travel for 1 week or more, utilizing a variety of travel means and many destinations. Visiting main attractions, cultural and natural features. Good food, adequate accommodation, fair prices, variety. 2nd timers + crowd avoiders International long-haul Individual or small group travel – usually self- organized for 1 week or more, usually spending more time in fewer destinations. Authentic experiences and specific activities (i.e. trekking, caving). Adequate accommodation, good food and services, authenticity and personal experiences. On holiday Domestic Travel as a family, during national holidays and annual holiday periods Relaxation, entertainment, visiting main attractions. Good food, adequate accommodation, shopping opportunities, fair prices. Phuot Domestic Independent or small group travel, often by motorbike. Seeking alternative activities and non-touristic locations. Adequate accommodation and food, cheap prices, authenticity. Day trippers Domestic Independent travel by families and friends in private vehicles for 1 day, usually on weekends or national holidays. Relaxation, entertainment, visiting main attractions. Good food, good services, ease of travel.
  55. 55. C. Matching markets with product development opportunities & objectives
  56. 56. What is tourism product-market matching? • Connecting the characteristics, motivations and expectations of market segments with suitable tourism products • To ensure sustainability, products should also be matched with development opportunities and objectives of the host destination Tourism product •Entertainment and relaxation •Culture •Nature •Adventure •Education Tourism market •Characteristics •Motivations •Expectations
  57. 57. Product-market matching conceptual diagram PRODUCT A PRODUCT B PRODUCT C PRODUCT E PRODUCT D PRODUCT F PRODUCT G PRODUCT I PRODUCT H MARKET SEGMENT 1 MARKET SEGMENT 2 MARKET SEGMENT 3 MARKET SEGMENT 4
  58. 58. Which markets would you match to these products in Vietnam?
  59. 59. Why are these markets linked to these products? Matching markets and products in Vietnam
  60. 60. Existing products New products 4 key product development options ExistingmarketsNewmarkets Market penetration Sell more of an existing product to an existing market Product development Sell a new or improved product to an existing market Market development Sell existing products to a new market Product diversification Sell new products to new markets
  61. 61. Developing existing tourism products To existing markets • Strategy: Intensive promotion of existing products to current market to increase market share To new markets • Strategy: Conduct market analysis to identify new and untapped markets with strong growth potential for existing products Picture source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwp-roger/4353435590/
  62. 62. Developing new tourism products To existing markets • Strategy: Expand on products in destination and promote to existing market segments To new markets • Strategy: Attract new markets with strong growth potential Picture source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/4410383427/
  63. 63. Market penetration and development: Vietnam tourism market segment opportunities MARKET SEGMENT OPPORTUNITIES Independent international travellers Often more flexible in their travel patterns and spending behaviours than those traveling in groups. Domestic markets Offer more stable, year-round business than international tourists. Business travellers and visitors to friends/family Have potential for add-on trips, activities and spending to business activities Specialty and niche markets Willing to spend more and stay longer for authentic and / or unique special interest activities and experiences such as birdwatching, trekking, diving etc
  64. 64. D. Responsible tourism product development strategy and action planning
  65. 65. Responsible tourism product development strategy and action plan development process 1. Define the responsible tourism product development vision, goals and objectives 2. Identify and prioritise responsible tourism product development ideas 3. Design responsible tourism product development interventions 4. Develop responsible tourism product development action plan Strategy activities Action plan activities
  66. 66. 1. Define the responsible tourism product development vision, goals and objectives • Vision: Reflects the broad aims and purpose of tourism development • Goals: A clear, agreed set of aspirations to work towards • Objectives: Specific targets that when reached, will achieve the goals
  67. 67. Example of a vision, goals, and objectives in responsible tourism product development Example vision statement: • “To develop competitive and sustainable tourism products that contribute to the improvement of local livelihoods” Example development goals: • To increase the amount of spending by tourists in the destination • To improve the performance and profitability of local tourism businesses • To increasing investment in tourism • To reduce the impact of tourism on the local environment and resources Example development objectives: • To increase full time employment in tourism in the local area by 15% by 2015 • To increase average daily spend of international visitors in the local area by 5% by 2020 • To increase average annual visitation to cultural villages by 10% by 2015
  68. 68. 2. Identify and prioritise responsible tourism product development ideas Key considerations include the degree to which intervention ideas help achieve: 1. Commercial viability goals: The commercial viability and realistic development potential of the products 2. Sustainability goals: The degree to which local environmental, social and economic benefits will be created 3. Sectoral goals: Strengthening infrastructure & communications; Improving promotion in key markets; Improving visitor information & interpretation; Improving quality standards; Improving safety & security Commercial viability test Sustainability test Sectoral test TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT OPTION
  69. 69. 3. Design responsible tourism product development interventions • Starting point - review development goals, outputs of the product-market matching analysis and the product assessment activities • Approaches to consider when designing interventions can include: Working with products that are generating high volumes of spending Working with products which may already be delivering a high proportion of spending to the poor Fostering, supporting and encouraging growth and participation of the poor
  70. 70. Principles for preparing a responsible tourism product development strategy • Emphasise stakeholder involvement • Based on principles of sustainable tourism: RESPONSIBLE TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY Economically viable and competitive Socially equitable and culturally sensitive Environmentally responsible
  71. 71. 4. Develop the responsible tourism product development action plan • Clearly sets out what is being done, when, by whom, and resource commitments • Should be able to function as a stand-alone resource • General principles: – Ensure participation – Duration appropriate for the destination – Specify actions for all key stakeholders Who? What? When? Resources?
  72. 72. Guiding principles for securing resources for implementing action plans • Use the project action plan as a tool • Use a joint partnership budget or fund individually • Allow time for resource mobilisation • Identify mechanisms for receiving funding • Be flexible in financial planning • Look to the future VND
  73. 73. Action plan template ACTIVITY 1 RESULT TIMING RESPONSIBILITY RESOURCES Sub-activity 1 Sub-activity 2 Sub-activity 3 Sub-activity 4 ACTIVITY 2 RESULT TIMING RESPONSIBILITY RESOURCES Sub-activity 1 Sub-activity 2 Sub-activity 3 Sub-activity 4 ACTIVITY 3 RESULT TIMING RESPONSIBILITY RESOURCES Sub-activity 1 Sub-activity 2 …
  74. 74. TOPIC 4. CREATING RESPONSIBLE TOURISM SUPPLY CHAINS RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS Picture source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/echovalleyranch/7006775983/
  75. 75. Key elements in developing responsible tourism supply chains A. Understand the principles of responsible tourism supply chains B. Develop sustainable supply chain policies and action plans C. Raise awareness and support suppliers to meet sustainability targets
  76. 76. A. Understand the principles of responsible tourism supply chains
  77. 77. What is a supply chain? • The system of moving of a product or service from supplier to customer • Results in natural resources, raw materials, and components being transformed into a finished product • Tourism supply chains involve core and ancillary tourism goods and services • The final product purchased in a general tourism supply chain is the holiday Picture sources: vov.vn/Uploaded/VietHoa/2012_11_21/Bieu%20dien%20van%20nghe.jpg http://sinhcafe.com/photo_north/Maichau/maichau_hoabinh_trekking_adventuretoursdotvn.jpg http:// www.schoolanduniversity.com/images/page_uploads/Food-and-beverage-Management.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/97/Premier_Executive_Transport_Services_Boeing_737-700_KvW.jpg http://www.relaxitsdone.co.nz/_media/images/257-luxury-accommodation-in-queenstown-at-45-south-luxurious-master-bedroom.jpg
  78. 78. Picture source: http://piboonrungroj.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/slide03.jpg The tourism sector supply chain
  79. 79. Two compelling reasons why we need sustainable supply chains in tourism Consumers expect it You are eroding your core product
  80. 80. Some other good reasons to develop a sustainable supply chain • Improved profile / brand • Improved market access • Increased operational effectiveness • Increased sustainability
  81. 81. The function of making tourism supply chains more sustainable • Recognises sustainability goes beyond the company • Uses the power of policies and contracts combined with b2b support to create positive change • Requires working with suppliers to achieve positive financial and sustainability performance • Is grounded in the principles of responsible tourism Healthy communities Natural environment Economic vitality SUSTAINABLE TOURISM
  82. 82. Example: Putting responsibility into a component of a tour operator’s supply chain TOUROPERATOR Hotel Restaurant Dairy suppliers Fruit & vegetable suppliers Canned goods suppliers Others Attractions Others Tour operator • Uses local destination guides • Employs local staff • Recycles • Informs guests of sustainability issues • … Restaurant • Employs local staff • Sources sustainable food • Implements Fair Trade • Supports local sustainability projects • Pays fair salaries • … Suppliers • Grow food organically • Do not sell endangered animals • Have good working conditions • …
  83. 83. Example of a simple tour operator supply chain http://sociologicalimagination.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/tourism.jpg http://www.vietnamonline.com/userfile/news/dangnguyen/2012/11/Vietnam%20expects%206%20million%20foreign%20tourists%20this%20year.jpg http://images02.jaovat.com/ui/2/75/58/22306758_1.jpg http://stores.niengiamtrangvang.com/admin/pics/395686035/VAN%20CHUYEN%20KHACH%20DU%20LICH.jpg http://quantri.dntu.edu.vn/uploads/news/2013_05/huong-dan-vien-du-lich.jpg http://a9.vietbao.vn/images/vn901/khoa-hoc/11149425-nha-hang.jpg http://www.msccruises.com/gl_en/Images/Spa-packages.jpg http://du-lich.chudu24.com/f/m/1310/15/7-diem-den-hap-dan-nhat-viet-nam-tren-tap-chihuffington-post-2.jpg http://www.dulichvietnam.com.vn/data/quang-nam.jpg Transport Tour guide Food and Beverage Craft village and souvenir Spa and entertainment Destination and facilities
  84. 84. B. Develop sustainable supply chain policies and action plans
  85. 85. The benefits of having sustainable supply chain policy in tourism • Helps defend a company from legal disputes  • Demonstrates company commitment to sustainability  • Promotes support of suppliers to achieve sustainability objectives • Create greater stability and consistency in supplier sustainability actions resulting in the faster achievement of sustainability objectives
  86. 86. TOPIC 2 TOPIC 3 TOPIC 4 The key steps to developing a sustainable supply chain Understand where you are Conduct a baseline study to understand the sustainability of your existing supply chain Decide where you want to be Develop a sustainable supply chain policy, standards, targets and action plan Help your suppliers get there Raise awareness, build capacity and offer rewards to help your suppliers meet the sustainability goals Monitor performance and improve Monitor, evaluate and improve performance of suppliers in meeting sustainability targets
  87. 87. Example of responsible supply chain policy statement A1 Tours recognises that our social, economic and environmental impacts reside as much in our supply chain as in our own activities. In our supply chain A1 Tours will ensure that our suppliers are: • Aware of the specific environmental, social and economic issues, risks and opportunities relevant to their operations and products • Ensure they operate to internationally recognised standards of practice • Ensure systems implemented deliver effective performance management and improvement A1 Tours Responsible Supply Chain Policy Statement
  88. 88. Example of responsible supply chain procedures In order to develop a sustainable supply chain, A1 Tours will: 1. Take a leadership role in sustainable supply chain management 2. Screen suppliers for their performance in social, economic and environmental issues management 3. Support suppliers to improve sustainability performance 4. Set minimum performance standards 5. Consult with stakeholders 6. Monitor compliance to agreements 7. Terminate business relationships if performance remains below standard or suppliers are unable or unwilling to work towards performance targets A1 Tours Responsible Supply Chain Procedures
  89. 89. Sustainable supply chain action planning • Sets out the activities and resources required to support suppliers to meet sustainability standards and targets • Requirements: – Participation and agreement – Understanding of standards – Adequate resources including knowledge and skills
  90. 90. The TOI’s tips for effective sustainable supply chain action planning Involve suppliers incrementally Plan for different rates of supplier progress Focus on continuous improvements Work with other partners in the same destination Source: Tour Operators’ Initiative for Sustainable Development (TOI) 2004, Supply Chain Engagement for Tour Operators: Three Steps Toward Sustainability, TOI, France
  91. 91. Key steps in developing a sustainable contracting system • Develop approach and procedures for implementation of sustainability performance as a contracting criteria • Draft contractual clauses for minimum performance requirements • Establish procedures for supplier non-compliance  • Appoint a staff member to manage sustainable supply chain activities
  92. 92. C. Raise awareness and support suppliers to meet sustainability targets
  93. 93. The importance of awareness and support in developing sustainable supply chains •Develop sustainability messages •Communicate sustainability messages to suppliers Raising awareness creates understanding, participation and commitment •Provide training, information, networks, assistance •Offer incentives and rewards Providing support promotes action
  94. 94. Awareness raising channels relevant to developing a sustainable tourism supply chain Meetings and workshops Gather relevant suppliers together to communicate about the sustainability supply chain programme and new or amended policies. Newsletters, brochures & flyers Inform suppliers and others about the new or amended policy through your organisation’s print promotional material such as newsletters, flyers and brochures. It’s also good for your customers to read. Website Create a section on sustainability in the company website to communicate responsible tourism policies and actions. Great for suppliers and customers. Email Deliver information about the sustainability program directly to the mailbox of the supplier. Coming from senior management can add a level of authority. Quick and direct. Picture sources: Pixabay, http://pixabay.com/
  95. 95. Communicating the new sustainable supply chain policy: Key information to deliver Sustainability policy / Code of Conduct etc •The original policy / procedures / code etc in full Background •Explanation of comprehensive development process adopted Purpose •Importance about why the sustainability programme is needed Affected stakeholders •Indication about who the Policy, Code etc affects Benefits & incentives •What the direct and indirect benefits of adoption will be Implementation plan •What the company will do next to instigate the sustainability programme Further information •Where to obtain further information (or from who) and how
  96. 96. Supporting tourism suppliers through capacity building CAPACITY BUILDING OPTIONS Training Informati on resource s Mentori ng Fam trips Network s
  97. 97. The TOI’s recommendations on incentives for suppliers to meet sustainability goals • Suppliers need to be convinced of the advantages of taking sustainability measures • Recognition and rewards help foster positive action • Develop a “preferred supplier” scheme for suppliers that meet sustainability goals which offers benefits such as:  Higher rates  Longer-term contracts  Committed guarantees  Joint marketing agreements  More brochure space  Joint promotional activities  Favoured status in system sales searches Source: Tour Operators’ Initiative for Sustainable Development (TOI) 2004, Supply Chain Engagement for Tour Operators: Three Steps Toward Sustainability, TOI, France
  98. 98. TOPIC 5. ENSURING RESPONSIBILITY IN MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS Picture source: Pixabay, www.pixabay.com
  99. 99. Key components of responsible marketing and communications A. Understand the role and importance of responsible marketing & communications B. Ensure authentic and accurate messages are communicated C. Market and communicate practices in sustainability D. Be guided by visitor feedback
  100. 100. A. Understand the role and importance of responsible marketing & communications
  101. 101. Applying principles of responsibility to marketing and communication • Respects law and good practice • Decent and honest • Respects fair competition • Has sense of social responsibility • Respects user privacy
  102. 102. Benefits of responsible tourism marketing and communication Creates competitive advantage Increases value and demand Increases customer loyalty Increases customer satisfaction Facilitates more respectful interaction in destinations
  103. 103. B. Ensure authentic and accurate messages are communicated
  104. 104. Authenticity in tourism experiences • Travel to experience something unique or original • Integrity can relate to a place, an object or an activity • While authenticity is perceived.. ..it remains highly connected to marketing tourism experiences • Services nature of tourism and component parts make marketing susceptible to inaccurate messages Picture source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Water_Puppet_Theatre_Vietnam(1).jpg
  105. 105. Examples of inauthentic advertising from around the world Picture sources: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-2128151/France-tourism-advertising-campaign-left-red-faced-allegations-using-false-photos.html http://www.adnews.com.au/adnews/tourism-australia-s-250m-push-labelled-false-advertising http://travel.ninemsn.com.au/blog.aspx?blogentryid=335279&showcomments=true  Sharing a bottle of wine on the beach…really? Are we in Spain or the Carribbean!? The Mediterranean Sea has never looked this good!
  106. 106. Commodification of culture • The manufacturing and selling of culture for profit • Response to fulfilling demand for perceived authenticity • May result in the loss of original meaning • Imperative to ensure involvement and determination of local people Picture source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Water_Puppet_Vietnam.jpg
  107. 107. Greenwashing • Knowingly misleading consumers about a product or service’s environmental practices or benefits for own gain CAUSES • Sector’s intensity in resource use • Largely unregulated nature of the sector • Sector composition and competition • Consumer demand EFFECTS • Erosion of public trust of tourism eco-labels • Reputational damage
  108. 108. Greenwashing is all around us but can be hard to spot Example 1 • A hotel chain claims to be environmentally friendly because they allow guests to choose whether to sleep on the same sheets and use the same towels for continuous days. While the idea is good it is not making a significant difference. More impact can be made by installing for example, motion-sensor lighting, more efficient insulation and heating, or purchasing non- toxic carpeting and bedding. Example 2 • A well-known international fast food restaurant chain tried to paint itself as ‘green’ just because it had begun to use biofuel made from leftover grease in its fleet of trucks as well as using recycled paper in its takeaway bags. However the company still uses beef grazed on deforested land in South America, and bases its entire concept around disposable packaging. Source: Marie C. 2013, ‘Misleading Marketing: Beware the Greenwash!’, Elux Magazine, Feb 12, 2013
  109. 109. C. Market and communicate practices in sustainability
  110. 110. Key steps for communicating sustainability: The “Keep it Real” approach Understand the market Identify objectives of sustainability communications Develop appropriate messages and communication channels Communicate messages at the right time STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 3 STEP 4 Source: VisitEngland 2010, Keep it real – market and communicate your credentials, London: VisitEngland and England’s Regional Sustainable Tourism Leads Group
  111. 111. Step 1. Understand the markets and customise sustainability messages • While most consumers care it does not mean they will act differently • However, when everything else is equal, sustainability values and actions differentiate a product • Need to know attitudes of key market segments and tailor sustainability messages accordingly “Ethical seekers”: Seek out green holidays as a continuation of their lifestyle “Just want to switch off”: Want a simple, uncomplicated break from daily life “Feel good factor”: Take an interest in sustainable tourism through travel press Key market segments
  112. 112. Step 2. Identify objectives of sustainability communications 1. To raise awareness and change behaviour 2. To allow tourists to feel good about doing the right thing 3. To increase visitation and/or sales Picture sources: http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/images/London-1874- 1885_i1314084682.php?type=tax_images&taxon=7&sort_order=asc&sort_key=year http://www.flickr.com/photos/ilovegreenland/10134146143/sizes/m/in/photostream/ http://www.vietnamspirittravel.com/guide/vietnam_bank_notes.htm
  113. 113. Step 3. Develop appropriate messages and communication channels • Common mistakes in communicating messages of sustainability: – Lecturing tourists – Being overly apologetic • Key: Communicate messages carefully to get the desired response from the consumer. Picture source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hmong_minority_children_in_Sa_Pa.JPG
  114. 114. BEFORE BOOKING • Pre-departure info BETWEEN BOOKING & ARRIVAL • Tourism product sustainability areas DURING THE VISIT • Physically show sustainability practices AFTER THE VISIT • Updates on sustainability activities Step 4. Communicating messages at the right time
  115. 115. D. Be guided by visitor feedback
  116. 116. Methods for collecting visitor feedback A. Surveys B. Focus groups C. Feedback forms and comment cards D. Social media E. On the spot verbal feedback and observation
  117. 117. A. Collecting visitor feedback through surveys • Set of predetermined questions about specific topics • Often used to gauge customer satisfaction after the use of a product or service • Good for benchmarking performance • Enable businesses to align their services to the expectations and needs of visitors • Can be online, by phone, mail or face to face • Best to repeat visitor satisfaction surveys at least every 3-4 years (minimum)
  118. 118. B. Collecting visitor feedback through focus groups • Open discussion of a small group of people led by a moderator • Gets in depth understanding of thoughts and opinions • Structured around predetermined questions • Group is homogenous • ‰Requires repetition
  119. 119. C. Collecting visitor feedback through feedback forms and comment cards • Physical, paper cards or forms with one or more survey questions • Designed to gather feedback after a good or service has been consumed • E.g. Visitor book at cultural heritage site, providing hotel guests with a comments card
  120. 120. D. Collecting visitor feedback through social media • Enable both direct feedback and feedback on consumer attitudes and trends • Allows product feedback before implementation through questions and discussions • Enables monitoring of brand awareness through search results • Allows for answering of basic questions via polls and e- surveys • Can elicit emotional feedback via YouTube
  121. 121. E. Collecting visitor feedback through on the spot feedback and observation • Observe what visitors are doing • Understand what visitors are thinking • Simple, cheap and fast • Helps fix problems before visitors depart • Attitude: “all feedback is good feedback”
  122. 122. TOPIC 6. RESPONSIBLE SUPPORT TO TOURISM DESTINATIONS RESPONSIBLE TOURISM FOR TOUR OPERATORS Picture source: Pixabay, www.pixabay.com
  123. 123. Key components of providing responsible support to tourism destinations A. Understand the role and importance of supporting destinations B. Incorporate responsible tourism practices into interactions with destination communities C. Promote sustainable tourism in destinations D. Help fund sustainable tourism in destinations
  124. 124. A. Understand the role and importance of supporting destinations
  125. 125. What do we mean by supporting local tourism destinations? • The provision of assistance to local communities to manage their tourism related resources sustainably • Recognises a moral obligation • Recognises it also makes businesses sense • Requires not only supporting the local people, but also the local environment, culture and economy Picture source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/noxstar/5196831438/
  126. 126. The role and benefits of supporting local tourism destinations Picture sources: http://pixabay.com/en/together-team-people-circle-hands-235128/; http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Brass_scales_with_cupped_trays.png; http://archive.saga.vn/view.aspx?id=17697; http://vi.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%E1%BB%99i_Gi%C3%B3ng; http://hinhanh.1ty.vn/view-3074/; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiang_Mai_Province SUPPORTING LOCAL TOURISM DESTINATIONS Participation & inclusion
  127. 127. Implementing effective support to local destinations for sustainable tourism Develop mechanisms for responsible tourism interaction Engage with key stakeholders to promote sustainable tourism development Help finance sustainable tourism • Organisational policies & procedures • Codes of conduct • Collaboration and partnership agreements • Engaging with authorities • Partnering with the private sector • Raising awareness & building capacity in sustainable tourism • Driving business • Visitor charitable activities • Fundraising • Sponsorships TOPIC 3 TOPIC 4TOPIC 2
  128. 128. B. Incorporate responsible tourism practices into interactions with destination communities
  129. 129. Relationships in a tourism code of conduct LOCAL TOURISM DESTINATION Code of Conduct Destination Management Organisation (DMO) Tourists Tourism Organisation Environment People Economy
  130. 130. Example of a visitor code of conduct 1/2 Source: VNAT, Do’s and Don'ts in Vietnam for Community-based Tourists, VNAT, Vietnam
  131. 131. Example of a visitor code of conduct 2/2 Source: VNAT, Do’s and Don'ts in Vietnam for Community-based Tourists, VNAT, Vietnam
  132. 132. Communicating codes of conduct to visitors BEFORE BOOKING • Destination’s people, culture and environment • Website, social media, brochures… DURING THE VISIT • Meet and greet • Detailed information about destination’s people, culture and environment • Signs in prominent places • Tour guides reinforce key issues BETWEEN BOOKING & ARRIVAL • How to prepare • Pre-departure pack
  133. 133. C. Promote sustainable tourism in destinations
  134. 134. Why the tourism private sector has a responsibility to promote responsible tourism • The tourism private sector is central in the tourism system giving them power and influence over how tourism develops • Collectively tourism enterprises are highly connected to the nature and impacts of tourism on destinations • Links and partnerships with tourism authorities, other businesses and the local community are key areas where the private sector can influence sustainability Picture sources: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vietjet_Air_VN-A686_Pepsi_livery_(11100523213).jpg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%C6%A1m_t%E1%BA%A5m http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rex_Hotel
  135. 135. The power and influence of the tourism private sector TOURISM ENTERPRISE (hotel, tour operator, restaurant, attraction, etc) BUSINESS COMMUNITY GOVERNMENT VISITORS SUPPLY CHAIN ACTORS Provide employment within their organisations Provide revenue through payment of tourism tariffs & taxes Provide tourism goods & services (enable the “tourism experience”) Purchase component goods & services to create tourism products Promote and / or provide trade to local businesses Influence Influence Influence
  136. 136. 3 ways the private sector can influence sustainable tourism in destinations 1. Engagement with tourism authorities 2. Working with like-minded organisations 3. Raising awareness in local communities
  137. 137. 1. Private sector engagement with destination tourism authorities A. Participate in public sector organised conferences, meetings & fourms C. Participate in public sector surveys / research B. Participate in destination policy & planning processes D. Engage in public-private partnerships Picture sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handshake http://rmbr.nus.edu.sg/news/index.php?phrase=heok%20hui&start=10&category= http://www.flickr.com/photos/mhcseattle/1111568504/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/ilri/7549725204/
  138. 138. 2. Working with like-minded organisations The tourism private sector can indirectly influence destination development and sustainability by: Work with business • Join an industry association or group and lobby internally and externally for greater sustainability Work with NGOs • Collaborate with NGOs engaging in sustainable tourism projects to foster positive change.
  139. 139. Pro-Poor Tourism Project in Quan Ba, Ha Giang Province, Vietnam Location Quan Ba District, Ha Giang, Viet Nam Duration 48 months Funding Caritas Luxembourg, Caritas Switzerland and Misereor Objectives Overall Objective: reduce poverty of local communities through establishing an income- generating activity by -and for the villagers based on available and unique cultural and natural resources, its sustainable management and fostering their cultural identity. Specific Objectives:  By 2013, each commune has 2-3 villages that generate income from pro-poor tourism (homestay, services, local products, fees, and others);  On average each village receives minimum 150-200 tourists a year (maximum 720 tourists a year) for 1 night by 2013;  At least 40 households (5 per village) have regular employment and income from PPT activities and 10% belong to the poorest category;  Villages and tourist companies (8-10 in total) work together based on a MoU of PPT (2010).
  140. 140. 3. Helping raise awareness in local communities about the importance of sustainable tourism RAISING AWARENESS ABOUT SUSTAINABLE TOURISM Schools, universities & colleges Seminars & conferences Scholarships & donations • Speaking opportunities • Course input • As a presenter • As a delegate • Sustainability scholarships • Sustainability resources
  141. 141. D. Help fund sustainable tourism in destinations
  142. 142. How the private sector can help finance sustainable tourism destinations 1.Send business to heritage sites 2. Help with business plans & funding proposals 3. Partner, sponsor & fundraise 4. Promote & gain customer support 5. Encourage donations Picture sources: http://www.flickr.com/photos/wonderlane/4284011682/ http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Internet1.jpg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxfam http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Looseleaf.jpg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nature
  143. 143. 1. Sending business to heritage sites • In Vietnam market analyses highlight significance of nature and culture as key motivations for travel • Promoting heritage sites also fosters greater appreciation of nature and culture and helps develop revenue to finance protection and promotion • How? – Tour operators. Incorporate natural and cultural heritage sites into range of tour packages – Hotels, restaurants etc. Recommend visiting heritage sites to customers if asked by customers ACTIVITIES & ATTRACTIONS OF HERITAGE SITES • Hiking • Cycling • Observing wildlife • Boating • Homestay experiences • Traditional art and crafts • Viewing historical relics • Observing cultural performances • Appreciating architecture • Observing religious traditions
  144. 144. 2. Assisting local organisations to prepare business plans and funding proposals What? • Local organisations working in sustainability frequently lack the knowledge and skills to strategically develop their organisations. • Two key activities that can help strengthen institutions to be more economically sustainable are strategic business planning and financing Why? • To help support organisations that are building a destination that is socially, environmentally and economically healthier and happier and more attractive for tourists to visit How? 1. Assist organisations doing good work to prepare simple business plans 2. Assist social and environmental organisations identify funding opportunities and to develop funding proposals
  145. 145. 3. Partnering, sponsoring or fundraising to support environmental and social causes Picture sources: http://www.itu.int/osg/csd/cybersecurity/gca/cop/together.html • Directly support sustainability activities in destinations by: – Helping finance NGO or community development activities – Donate unneeded equipment to needy organisations – Sponsor internships – Provide prizes of company goods or services at fundraising events – Give staff time off to participate in volunteering activities
  146. 146. 4. Promoting and gaining customer support in sustainability activities • Visitors often learn about sustainability issues after they get to the destination • Providing opportunities to support sustainability activities in the destination can tap into the good- will that is aroused • Businesses can link heritage sites with visitor support • Some common types of visitor support for sustainable development include donations, volunteering and advocacy Print material. Include information about how to support conservation and social development in the company brochure, flyer and displays around common areas Digital communication. Put on your website info about sustainability issues, support activities and how to get involved. Enable electronic donations. Play a video on the way to heritage sites. Personal recommendations. Inform tour guides and service staff about how visitors can support heritage conservation and get them to communicate this to guests
  147. 147. 5. Encouraging customers to donate to sustainability activities • Encouraging donations means providing ways for customers to directly provide finance for sustainability activities • Three key requirements: 1. Make it easy for customers to learn about a particular sustainability issue, activity, or organisation (who, what, why, how) 2. Be able to respond to questions 3. Provide clear ways for people to make contributions • How? – Provide a donations “drop box” – Add a certain amount to the holiday price – Add a fee or donation to a guests’ bill – Send a % of profits to a charity Picture sources: http://www.freefoto.com/preview/04-28-50/US-Dollar-Bills
  148. 148. Xin trân trọng cảm ơn! Thank you!

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