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Unit 10: Responsible Accommodation Operation: Managing Energy, Water And Waste

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Unit 10: Responsible Accommodation Operation: Managing Energy, Water And Waste

  1. 1. UNIT 10. RESPONSIBLE ACCOMMODATION OPERATION: MANAGING ENERGY, WATER & WASTE
  2. 2. Unit outline Objectives By the end of the unit participants will be able to: • Explain the importance of adopting responsible tourism principles in accommodation operations • Explain procedures for reducing energy consumption in accommodation operations • Explain procedures for saving water in accommodation operations • Explain procedures minimising waste in accommodation operations • Explain how to raise awareness and build capacity in sustainable accommodation operations • Describe how to set sustainability targets for improvement • Describe the function and benefits of the Vietnam Green Lotus Standards Topics 1. Tourism and the accommodation sector overview 2. The issue of water, energy and waste in the accommodation sector 3. Implementing waste, water & energy minimisation actions 4. Introduction to Green Lotus standards
  3. 3. TOPIC 1. TOURISM AND THE ACCOMMODATION SECTOR OVERVIEW UNIT 10. RESPONSIBLE ACCOMMODATION OPERATION: MANAGING ENERGY, WATER AND WASTE
  4. 4. The accommodation sector Homestays Hotels
  5. 5. How the accommodation sector adds value Stay longer See and do more Spend more More jobs & income
  6. 6. Where the accommodation sector adds value • Jobs and income • Government revenue • Infrastructure development • Supports socio-economic strategies • More foreign direct investment
  7. 7. Vietnam accommodation sector at a glance increase on average people employed in accommodation and food service in 2011 15.9% 2,056,000 235,000 hotel rooms in 2010 in room supply over the last decade
  8. 8. Vietnam 3-5 star hotel sector: Key operating figures 3 4 5 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 Avg. number of rooms 55 60 101 113 243 243 Avg. occupancy 66% 69% 59% 59% 57% 56% Avg. room rate (USD) $46 $47 $93 $88 $123 $125 Avg. RevPAR (USD)# $30 $32 $55 $52 $71 $70 EBITDA^ 19% 27% 38% 29% 28% 35% Grant Thornton 2013, Vietnam Lodging Industry Hotel Survey 2013, Grant Thornton, Vietnam ^ EBITDA = Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation & amortisation # RevPAR = Revenue per available room
  9. 9. Count of 3-5 star hotels across Vietnam Grant Thornton 2013, Vietnam Lodging Industry Hotel Survey 2013, Grant Thornton, Vietnam
  10. 10. Impacts of unsustainable practices in the accommodation sector • High energy use contributes to global warming • High water use can put pressure on local water supplies • Untreated waste water can impact on environment and human health  • Land clearing in coastal areas can increase vulnerability to natural disasters  • Economic leakage can further entrench poverty •Large scale developments can restrict local access to natural resources •Unfair employment conditions can restrict socio- economic development
  11. 11. Consumer demand for sustainable hotels Leisure travellers • 87% of leisure travellers believe it is important that a hotel is environmentally friendly • 75% of leisure travellers are influenced by a hotel’s environmental policies when deciding on a hotel Business travellers • 90% of business travellers look to green while away • 38% of business travellers have taken steps to determine whether a hotel is green • 40% of business travellers are willing to pay more for green lodgingSource: Slye, J. 2009, ‘Hotels: What’s Keeping You From Going Green?’, TriplePundit, Available [online]: http://www.triplepundit.com/2009/11/hotels-whats-keeping-you- from-going-green (Accessed May 2013) Source: Weissenberg, A., Redington, N. & Kutyla, D. 2008, The staying power of sustainability: Balancing opportunity and risk in the hospitality industry, Deloitte LLP
  12. 12. 3-5 star hotels acting responsibly in Vietnam • Report major changes in awareness55% • Have an environmental plan in place82% • Strongly taking measures to improve energy efficiency & reduce waste 65% • Conduct environmental training31% • Aim to achieve the VNAT Green Lotus Label50% Source: Grant Thornton 2013, Vietnam Lodging Industry Hotel Survey 2013, Grant Thornton, Vietnam
  13. 13. Benefits of going green •Cost savings through efficiency •Competitive advantage  •Improved resilience to the effects of climate change •New customers  •Increased customer loyalty •Preparedness for new legislation •Minimise reduced revenue from increased operating costs and loss of competitive advantage 
  14. 14. TOPIC 2. THE ISSUE OF WATER, ENERGY AND WASTE IN THE ACCOMMODATION SECTOR UNIT 10. RESPONSIBLE ACCOMMODATION OPERATION: MANAGING ENERGY, WATER AND WASTE
  15. 15. The impact of tourists’ demands for a comfortable stay OK, so my hotel must have… …good heating if it’s cold – but also air-conditioning if it’s warm! I want a comfortable bed with extra pillows and blankets at a minimum and my room must be large and spacious so I can spread out. I also want lots of recreational options like a swimming pool, gym, kids room, and tours. I need a good flushing toilet and both a shower and bath (just in case I want to really relax) with reliable hot water. The hotel must have a restaurant and room service of course I want regular drinking water in my room every day. Oh yes, I also must have a satellite TV with all the best channels! Hmmm… what else…?
  16. 16. Impacts of overconsumption of energy and water and increased pollution and waste Impacts High consumption of natural resources Increased production of waste Environment Local community Company earnings
  17. 17. Achieving sustainability Energy Water Waste
  18. 18. Water use in accommodation • Production of meals • Functioning of bathroom & toilet appliances • Washing of room linen & guests’ clothes • Provision of swimming pools • Maintenance of gardens & grounds • Others?
  19. 19. Water waste in accommodation  Leaking taps and pipes  Excessively high water pressure  Poor choice of plants requiring a lot of water  Use of water inefficient appliances  Others?
  20. 20. Why should we reduce water consumption? of earth’s water is salt water and not drinkable < 1%of water resources is accessible freshwater of the earth’s water is part of glaciers 2% 300conflicts have been caused by water resource issues Water consumption has increased 4 times in the 50 last years but the population has only doubled > 4 billion live in countries facing water scarcity people > 97%
  21. 21. Energy use in accommodation • Lighting • Heating and cooling • Power appliances • Cooking • Refrigeration • Office equipment • Others?
  22. 22. Energy waste in accommodation  Poor maintenance of electrical equipment  Purchase of energy inefficient appliances  Inefficient heating and cooling practices  Leaving electrical appliances on  Others?
  23. 23. Why should we reduce energy consumption? Total primary energy supply has doubled in 35 years worldwide of investment will be necessary to satisfy the world energy demand by 2030 billion dollars 16,000
  24. 24. Typical power use in a hotel Total energy used in a typical hotel Total energy used in a typical hotel from electricity AHU = Air Handling Unit FCU = Fan Coil Unit Both AHU and FCU are associated with room air-conditioning Source: City of Melbourne 2007, Energy Wise Hotels: Toolkit December 2007, City of Melbourne, Australia
  25. 25. Sources of waste in accommodation • Paper & cardboard waste from the office • General consumer products from guests • Kitchen food waste, bags & containers • Metal, timber & other products from maintenance • Chemicals & garden waste from grounds • Others?
  26. 26. Causes of increased waste in accommodation  Incorrect storage and handling  Overestimation of product demand  Excessive packaging of products  Use of one-off disposable products  Not reducing, reusing or recycling  Others?
  27. 27. Why should we minimise waste production? 2600 tones of waste is produced in Hanoi per day 5.3 kg of waste is produced on average per person per day The quantity of waste produced by the Asia Pacific region will double by 2030 of waste is recycled worldwide<10%
  28. 28. Financial. You are throwing away money! Environmental. You are destroying important ecological processes that can affect your own health. Community. You are putting strain on the local community’s water and power supply and wasting resources in the production of not fully used products. Business. You are not meeting consumer expectations. 4 reasons why energy, water and waste reduction is important
  29. 29. TOPIC 3. IMPLEMENTING WASTE, WATER & ENERGY MINIMISATION ACTIONS UNIT 10. RESPONSIBLE ACCOMMODATION OPERATION: MANAGING ENERGY, WATER AND WASTE
  30. 30. Energy, water, waste reduction Patterns of use Equipment External factors The key elements of energy, water and waste minimisation
  31. 31. The basic principles of waste management: The 3Rs • To use things with care to reduce the amount of waste generated Reduce • To repeat use of items or parts of items Reuse • To use waste as resources Recycle
  32. 32. What can be reduced, reused and recycled?
  33. 33. Decomposition rates of different types of products
  34. 34. Reducing energy consumption in guest rooms Others: - Power control - Maintenance - Awareness - Bathroom hot water Windows Lights Electrical appliances Ceilings AC use
  35. 35. Considerations for reducing energy consumption in the pool, garden and grounds Windows Pool temperature & energy source Room temperature Indoor and garden lights Others: - Maintenance - Sauna & steam room timers
  36. 36. Considerations for reducing energy in common areas and the dining room Type of lights Doors & ventilation Others: - AC settings - Maintenance Windows
  37. 37. Considerations for reducing energy consumption in the office Natural light Ventilation Type of lights Computer power useOthers: - Power use of other electrical appliances
  38. 38. Considerations for reducing energy consumption from transport Vehicle type Tyre pressure Maintenance Others: - Staff transport - Off-site meetings Tinted windows
  39. 39. Considerations for reducing water consumption in the bathroom Sink tap water flow Toilet water flow Shower head type Toilet water volume Others: - Awareness - Maintenance of plumbing
  40. 40. Considerations for reducing water consumption in the laundry Type of washing machine Load size Others: - Maintenance
  41. 41. Considerations for reducing water consumption in the pool, garden and grounds Plant selection Variety of lawn Garden mulch Others: - Water sources - Type of hoses & sprinklers - Plant watering frequency and timing - Pool maintenance Pool water level
  42. 42. Considerations for minimising general waste
  43. 43. Considerations for minimising waste from the kitchenPolicy on plastic bag provision
  44. 44. Considerations for minimising waste from the guest rooms Picture sources: http://www.plumbingsupply.com/dispenser.html http://www.wallpaper.com/art/the-fedrigoni-hotel-book-50-types-of-paper/5393 http://www.treehugger.com/culture/ask-pablo-what-makes-a-hotel-green.html Types of toiletries
  45. 45. Considerations for minimising waste in the office Picture sources: http://www.buyecogreen.com.au/ecocern-a4-brown-paper-100-recycled-105-gsm-ream-500-sheets--p700363 https://www.officemaxcanada.com/en/sites/core/Think_overview.aspx http://blog.stickyinstitute.com/?p=376 http://www.printershoppers.com/printer-buying-guide/ Office equipment
  46. 46. Key steps in reducing consumption of energy and water & production of waste IDENTIFY BASELINE • Understand existing levels and forms of energy, water and waste SET BENCHMARKS • Set performance benchmarks and targets AUDIT PERFORMANCE • Identify inefficiencies and wastage and options for improvement TAKE ACTION • Plan and implement actions to improve sustainability MONITOR & EVALUATE • Monitor and evaluate performance Picture sources: http://www.actewagl.com.au/Help-and-advice/How-to-read-your-meters.aspx http://www.ourenergypolicy.org/debate-continues-over-energy-efficient-bulbs/ http://playingwithsid.blogspot.com/2013/11/vietnamese-language-tools-developing.html
  47. 47. 1. Understand existing levels and forms of energy, water and waste Establish a baseline in order to: • Quantify existing consumption of energy and water and production of waste in terms of: – Volume – Financial value – Type (forms) • Enable forecasting and target setting for improved performance Picture sources: http://www.tapwater.org/news/p/7
  48. 48. Creating a baseline for energy and water consumption Collect • Utility bills Collate • Data Calculate • Consumption and costs Picture sources: http://adventurejay.com/blog/index.php?m=01&y=13&entry=entry130128-210431 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SHARP_ELSIMATE_EL-W221.jpg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Studying.jpg
  49. 49. Example of collated data for electricity use and the calculated usage and cost DATE OF ELECTRICTY READING USAGE FOR PERIOD (kW) RATE (VND/kW) COST (VND) 1/01/2014 1,500 3,500 5,250,000 1/04/2014 2,000 3,500 7,000,000 1/08/2014 1,800 3,500 6,300,000 1/12/2014 1,325 3,500 4,637,500 TOTAL 6,625 23,187,500 Total electricity usage over 1 year period = Baseline usage Total electricity cost over 1 year period = Baseline cost
  50. 50. Creating a baseline for waste production • Estimate the volume of: – different types of waste produced in – different departments / sections on – different days. • Estimate waste disposal cost for the above types of waste Picture source: http://www.banthebottle.net/government/do-you-really-know-what-is-inside-bottled-water/
  51. 51. Calculating your volume of waste Number of containers per month Volume per container (L) 12 (months) Average volume (L) of waste in 1 year Image sources: http://highlanderimages.blogspot.com/2011/12/rubbish-man.html http://nushine.com.au/cleaning-food-hygiene-products/bins-liners/garbage-bin/prod_101.html http://labspace.open.ac.uk/mod/resource/view.php?id=465057 http://www.wmich.edu/registrar/calendars/ Baseline volume of wasteTo convert volume into cubic metres of waste or tonnes of waste: Cubic metres = Total volume of waste (L) / 1,000 Tonnes = Total volume of waste (m3) x 2.29 (approx)
  52. 52. Costing your volume of waste Image sources: http://highlanderimages.blogspot.com/2011/12/rubbish-man.html http://labspace.open.ac.uk/mod/resource/view.php?id=465057 http://www.vietnamspirittravel.com/guide/vietnam_bank_notes.htm Baseline unit cost of waste Average volume of waste per month (m3 or tonnes) Cost of waste collection per month (VND) Unit cost of waste
  53. 53. 2. Set performance benchmarks and targets Performance benchmarks • National or international industry average • Can vary for different levels of accommodation • Helps establish potential savings opportunities Key performance indicators and targets • Quantifiable units of measurement that help identify progress • In the hospitality sector, benchmarks are often based one guest night or alternatively per occupied room – Water: Average litres / guest / night – Energy: Average kWh / occupied room – Waste: Average tonnes of waste / guest / night • Benchmarks can also be performance targets • Target reduction amount = Target - Baseline
  54. 54. Benefits of benchmarking • Heightens awareness of energy use • Assesses effectiveness of current operations, policies, practices • Sets priorities for upgrade efforts and retrofits • Tracks, verifies, and recognises achievements • Documents role in environmental stewardship and demonstrates success
  55. 55. Some examples of industry benchmarks of Hanoi 5 star hotels ITEM BENCHMARK Average room temperature 26-27 degrees C Average occupancy 230 rooms/night Electricity 120kwh/occupied room Water 1.08m3/occupied room Gas 0.22m3/occupied room Diesel 4.68 litre/occupied room
  56. 56. 3. Identify energy and water inefficiencies and causes of excessive waste A. Conduct a simple walk through audit of energy & water use • Create audit checklist for energy or water facilities and processes • Survey building structure, systems and resource use using observation and measurements to complete the audit checklist • Identify and record all pieces of equipment that use water and / or energy • Take notes of any outstanding questions or areas that need follow-up information or expertise Goal:  Identify inefficiencies in resource use in operational or maintenance areas  Identify potential savings and low cost or no cost improvements  Identify potential longer- term capital improvements
  57. 57. Conducting an audit of waste B. Conduct a walk-through audit of waste 1. Create audit checklist for waste facilities and processes 2. Survey product procurement use and waste disposal systems using observation and measurements to complete the audit checklist 3. Take notes of any outstanding questions or areas that need follow-up information or expertise Goal:  Identify current types and volumes of waste  Distinguish sources of waste  Identify poor practices in procurement of goods and waste disposal  Identify potential savings and low cost or no cost improvements  Identify potential longer- term capital improvements
  58. 58. Guiding principles for developing good audit checklist questions • Administration & communication • Lighting • Heating, ventilation and AC • Pool, garden and grounds • Kitchen • Office • Vehicles and transport • Recycling • Purchasing and supplies • … 1. Consider all accommodation sections / areas and processes • Type of resource, equipment, material • Usage patterns of staff and guests • External factors influencing behaviour and function 2. Try to develop questions around the key elements of energy & water reduction
  59. 59. Lighting energy audit questions Types Usage External factors • Have older lighting fixtures been upgraded? • Have incandescent light bulbs been replaced with compact fluorescent light bulbs? • Has unnecessary lighting been removed or disconnected, both indoor and outdoor? • Has unnecessary lighting been removed from vending machines? • Are lights turned off when rooms or areas are not occupied? • Are light switches labelled to denote location of lighting? • Have energy conservation stickers been placed on light switches? • Are lighting systems wired so that lights throughout a large area do not have to be on when only a small section of the area is being used? • Is task lighting used to reduce background or overhead lighting? • Have occupancy sensors been installed in areas that are frequently unoccupied (lobbies, bathrooms, conference, rooms, storage rooms, hallways, etc)? • Have timers been installed on outside lighting? • Has housekeeping and security staff been advised to keep lights turned off in unoccupied spaces? • Are lamps regularly cleaned? • Are broken lamps repaired? • Have non-working lights been replaced? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  60. 60. Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning (HVAC) energy audit questions Types Usage External factors • Are there exhaust hoods in the kitchen? • Have low energy ACs been installed? • Has AC type been selected to match space requirements? • Are there windows that can be opened? • Have thermal windows and glazing been installed to minimise heating and cooling loss? • Do the windows have curtains or blinds? • Are ceilings, roof and walls insulated? • Is HVAC system setback when building is unoccupied? • Is air conditioning and heating setback when weather permits? • Has direct conditioning of unoccupied areas (corridors, stairwells, storage rooms, etc) been minimised? • Are timers installed to switch off water heater when facilities are unoccupied? • Is energy conservation signage located throughout facility? • Are blinds and shades adjusted to manage warmth? • Are operable windows used for ventilation whenever possible? • Are heating and air conditioning thermostats set to the most efficient and comfortable level? • Are systems regularly cleaned and filters replaced? • Are exhaust fans turned off with the HVAC systems when space is unoccupied? • Does AC have thermostat sensors? • Does HVAC system have a timer or programmable? • Are doors fitted with automatic door closers? • Are kitchen appliances positioned under exhaust hoods? • Have air leaks been identified and repaired? • Are seals, weather stripping and caulking around openings in good condition? • Does building insulation need to be repaired or replaced? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  61. 61. Pool, garden, grounds energy audit questions Types Usage External factors • Do indoor pool and garden lights use low energy bulbs? • Is gym equipment turned off after business hours? • Are garden lights on a light sensor / timer? • Is pool temperature set to minimum required? • Is pool filter regularly cleaned? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  62. 62. Kitchen energy audit questions Types Usage External factors • Is dishwasher low energy rated? • Are refrigerators most energy efficient models? • Does range use induction technology? • Is equipment left on standby during slow times or afterhours? • Is oven operated only when full? • Are dishwashers only run when full? • Are refrigerators set to most efficient temperature? • Is kitchen equipment cleaned regularly? • Is regular maintenance scheduled? • Are oven seals and hinges operating correctly? • Are burners maintained and clean? • Is the water temperature and rinse pressure set to manufacturers recommended settings? • Are refrigerator doors and seals in proper condition to close tightly without leaks? • Are refrigerator coils clean and dust free? • Is the freezer frost free? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  63. 63. Office energy audit questions Types Usage External factors • Is office equipment the most energy efficient models (generally Energy Star)? • Are computers, monitors, printers, copiers and other office equipment turned off when not in use? • Are computers, monitors, printers, copiers and other office equipment set for “sleep” or energy saving mode? • Is equipment recycled or properly disposed of at end of use? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  64. 64. Vehicles and transportation energy audit questions Types Usage External factors • Are company vehicles most fuel efficient models available for your business’s requirements? • When purchasing a new vehicle is fuel efficiency prioritised? • Are employees encouraged or incentivised for taking public transport or carpooling? • Do company vehicles receive regular maintenance? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  65. 65. Administration and communication energy audit questions Communication and policy initiatives Employee and guest engagement Energy monitoring • Has the need to be more energy efficient been broadly communicated within the business? • Has a management team been organised to provide strategy and leadership around energy efficiency? • Has an energy management plan or savings plan been developed? • Have internal policies and procedures been developed around energy efficiency and management? • Are energy conservation/efficiency posters displayed throughout the facilities? • Are reward/acknowledgement programs provided for employees who conserve energy? • Are employees and guests provided education around energy efficiency? • Are employees provided regular updates on energy usage and progress towards energy savings? • Is energy usage regularly metered, monitored and recorded? • Is energy use benchmarked against industry best practice? • Have energy savings targets been set? • Are energy costs and program performance included in financial and business reviews? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  66. 66. Bathrooms water audit questions Types Usage External factors • Are toilets single flush? • Are toilets dual flush? • Are urinals cyclical (‘fill and dump’) flushing? • Do urinals have automatic sensor flushing? • Are taps mixed (both hot and cold together) or separate? • Do sink taps have flow regulators and aerators? • Do showers have water saving showerheads? • Is hot water heater and piping insulated? • Are hot water heaters switched off at night? • Are signs or information communicated to guests explaining requested water saving actions? • Are hot water heaters’ temperatures set too high? • Are the taps, showers and toilets leaking/running? • Are there leaks in the hot water heaters? • Are the cistern rubber seals on toilets replaced regularly? • Is the flow rate for showers, toilets and taps within the manufacturer’s recommended range? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  67. 67. Pool, garden and grounds water audit questions Types Usage External factors • Does swimming pool have a cover? • Are native vegetation and/or low- water plants used for landscaping? • Is compost used? • Are drip hoses used? • Is non-tap (drinking) water used for irrigation? • Does building have one or more rainwater tanks? • Is pool water temperature set to minimum required for comfort? • Is indoor pool air temperature set 1C above water temperature to minimise evaporation? • Are water hoses used for cleaning floors, sidewalks and car parks? • Is water recycled in water features? • Have pool equipment and meters been monitored for leaks? • Are there any leaks in piping, swimming pool or hoses? • External factors • Are filters cleaned through backwashing on a regular basis? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  68. 68. Kitchen and laundry water audit questions Types Usage External factors • Are taps mixed (both hot and cold together) or separate? • Do sink taps have flow regulators and aerators? • Is wok waterless? • Is dishwasher most water efficient model? • Are hot water heaters switched off at night? • Are hot water heaters’ temperatures set too high? • Is wok range flow rate set too high? • Are staff adequately trained to operate dishwashers? • Are the taps leaking/running? • Are there leaks in the hot water heaters? • Are dishwashers regularly maintained? • Is the flow rate for taps within the manufacturer’s recommended range? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  69. 69. Administration and communication water audit questions Communication and policy initiatives Employee and guest engagement Water monitoring • Has the need to conserve water been broadly communicated within the business? • Has a management team been organised to provide strategy and leadership around water conservation? • Has a water management plan or savings plan been developed? • Have internal policies and procedures been developed around water conservation and management? • Are water conservation posters displayed throughout the facilities? • Are rewards / acknowledgement programs provided for employees who are conserving water? • Are employees provided education around water conservation? • Are employees provided regular updates on water usage and progress towards water savings? • Is water usage regularly metered, monitored and recorded? • Is water use benchmarked against industry best practice? • Have water savings KPIs and targets been set? • Are water costs and program performance included in financial and business reviews? • Do you know your water costs? • Are monthly water bills reviewed for accuracy? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  70. 70. Waste audit questions: Recycling Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia • Are recycling bins provided for plastic, glass, paper, aluminium? • Are there recyclable materials in the general waste bins, i.e. cans/bottles? • Is there high contamination in recycling bins, i.e. garbage in paper recycling bins? • Is paper recycled? • Are waste bins provided at each desk in offices and guest rooms? • Are general waste and recycling bins located in convenient locations? • Are employees and guests informed and provided information on recyclable materials and goals?
  71. 71. Waste audit questions: Administration and communication Communication and policy initiatives • Has the critical need to reduce waste and recycle been broadly communicated within your business? • Has a management team been organised to provide strategy and leadership around waste reduction and recycling? • Has a waste reduction and recycling plan been developed? • Have internal policies and procedures been developed around waste reduction and purchasing? Employee engagement • Are waste reduction/recycling posters displayed throughout the organisation? • Are rewards/acknowledgement programs provided for employee who recycle and reduce waste? • Are employees provided education around waste reduction and recycling? • Are employees provided regular updates on recycling and progress towards waste reduction? Waste, materials and recycling tracking • Are waste, materials (stationary, paper, supplies, food, guest room products, etc) and recycling regularly monitored and recorded? • Have material, recycling and waste reduction KPIs and targets been set? • Are material, waste and recycling program performance included in financial and business reviews? • Are monthly waste, material and recycling bills reviewed for accuracy and efficiency? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  72. 72. Waste audit questions: Supplies and purchasing (bathroom, kitchen, housekeeping) • Are paper and stationary products made from recycled content? If yes, what percent is recycled (5,30,100%)? • Are toner and printer cartridges remanufactured? • Are cleaners supplied with environmentally friendly cleaning products? • Are bathroom tissue and paper towels made from recycled content? • Is food sourced from local producers whenever possible? • Is organic food purchased? • Are disposable dishes, cups and utensils used for in house dining or takeaway meals? • Do employees use disposable dishes and utensils? • Are there paper or stationary products that are rarely used? • Are toner and printer cartridges recycled? • Is there obvious waste of unused items i.e. office stationary, food, etc? • Have staff that purchase supplies been informed of waste reduction policies and initiatives? • Are ‘green’ supplies purchased? • Are there high levels of food in kitchen waste bins? • Are there high levels of food in restaurant and café waste bins? • Are plastic bags automatically given to guests for takeaway meals? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  73. 73. Waste audit questions: Office • Can all copiers/printers/faxes print double sided? • Are all computers and printers default settings set to print double sided? • Is office equipment recycled or properly disposed at end of use? • Does the company send paper invoices? • Does the company send out paper advertisements or promotions? Source: NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia
  74. 74. Understanding the existing situation with waste Conducting a waste quick scan A waste quick-scan should occur before conducting the walk0-through audit to understand the existing situation of waste. Key steps 1. Distribute rubbish bins of a known volume in key locations 2. When full, visually scan contents to determine approximate % of each type of rubbish. 3. Empty bin/s and repeat process over 1-2 days. 4. Calculate the volume of waste for each type of item by multiplying the size of the bin (e.g. in litres) by the % of types of waste. Picture source: http://www.banthebottle.net/government/do-you-really-know-what-is-inside-bottled-water/
  75. 75. Example of waste quick scan results DATE / TIME LOCATION BINSIZE PLASTICBOTTLES GLASSBOTTLES METALCANS MILKCARTONS CARDBOARD PAPER ORGANIC OTHER (LIST) 01/01/14; 11:00 Kitchen 50L 20% 5% 10% 5% 50% 10% broken crockery 01/01/14; 17:00 Kitchen 50L 10% 15% 5% 10% 60% 03/01/14; 17:00 Lobby 50L 20% 10% 20% 35% 10% 5% plastic bags 11/01/14; 10:00 Guest room 30L 40% 5% 5% 20% 30% 15/01/14; 17:30 Office 50L 10% 20% 55% 5% 10% plastic packaging
  76. 76. Example of waste quick scan results: Analysing kitchen waste Plastic bottles 20% Organic waste 50% Glass bottles 5% Metal cans 10% Milk cartons 5% Others 10%
  77. 77. 4. Planning and implementing actions to improve sustainability • Use results of audits and waste quick scan to understand energy and water use and waste production patterns • Prioritised audit results according to frequency and / or incidence • Identify opportunities to reduce water and energy use and minimise waste production • Assign responsibilities, timeframes and performance indicators
  78. 78. Example of how to evaluate waste minimisation opportunities and requirements SECTION 1: KITCHEN Common waste item Current disposal procedure Opportunities to minimise Requirements Paper serviettes Landfill Compost Develop and use composting system Plastic bottles Separated for recycling Provide separate bin for recyclable plastics Food scraps Landfill Compost (except meat and fish) Develop and use composting system Tin cans Landfill Separate for recycling Provide separate bin for recyclable metal … SECTION 2: GUEST ROOMS / HOUSEKEEPING …
  79. 79. Example of waste, water & energy reduction action plan WATER EFFICIENCY ACTION PLAN Description Cost Responsibility Time frame Install flow restrictors on taps VND 1,500,000,000 Maintenance manager 07/2014 Educational signage VND 2,000,000 Senior manager 02/2014 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ACTION PLAN Description Cost Responsibility Time frame Efficient lighting in hotel lobby VND 800,000,000 Maintenance manager 04/2014 Educational signage VND 2,000,000 Senior manager 03/2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT ACTION PLAN Description Cost Responsibility Time frame Recycling bins for common areas VND 400,000,000 Grounds manager 03/2014 Waste management staff training VND 4,000,000 Senior manager 03/2014
  80. 80. Gaining commitment and action from guests and staff to act sustainably GAIN COMMITMENT AND ACTION THROUGH Policy Training Brochure ReportingSigns and posters Sustainability teams and leaders Rewards
  81. 81. 5. Monitor, evaluate and adjust • Continually monitor and review performance by: – Re-implementing walk-through audits – Basic observational surveys – Conducting waste quick scans • Evaluate areas in which poor practices are continuing against the recommended actions and implement alternative solutions • If targets / benchmarks appear unattainable consider readjusting • Reinforce positive actions
  82. 82. TOPIC 4. OVERVIEW OF VIETNAM’S GREEN LOTUS CERTIFICATION UNIT 10. RESPONSIBLE ACCOMMODATION OPERATION: MANAGING ENERGY, WATER AND WASTE
  83. 83. Green Lotus label requirements Meet standards on environmental protection and sustainable development Make efforts to protect the environment Use natural resources and energy efficiently Contribute to the preservation of heritage and development of the local economy, culture and society Pursue sustainable tourism development
  84. 84. 25 BONUS CRITERIA Green Lotus criteria Basic 30 criteria A,B,C, D Encouraging 29 criteria A,B,C,D High 22 criteria A,B,C,D
  85. 85. Examples of Green Lotus criteria A SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT A1 Availability of plan(s) in written document and implementation of the management system for sustainable development according to actual conditions and scale of the tourist accommodation establishment. Above mentioned plans shall include a plan for natural and social environmental protection. A1.4 Availability of annual plan on implementation of social and cultural activities (both inside and outside of the tourist accommodation establishment) A2 The staff are given periodical training on the importance of and the solutions to protecting the environment, the issues of culture, society and health. A2.2 The staff are trained on cultural and social issues (once a year)
  86. 86. Examples of Green Lotus criteria B Maximise socio-economic benefits for local society B2 Priority in recruitment of laborers having local residence cards or people coming from less developed economic regions and provision of additional training if necessary B2.1 Availability of policies on recruiting local people, people from remote regions and less developed economic regions B3 Priority in usage of services and goods which are domestically or locally produced in the tourist accommodation establishments business activities B3.1 Priority in usage of locally made products or local raw materials without exhausting natural resources B5 Fairness in recruitment of local women and ethnic minority people living in the locality, including manager position; no child labour usage B5.1 Existence of gender-equality regarding staff employment B5.2 Availability of policies to support female employees (maternity, training, consultation on reproductive health, etc.)
  87. 87. Examples of Green Lotus criteria C Minimization of adverse impacts on cultural and natural heritage C2 Application of local traditional culture in the tourist accommodation establishment’s architecture, decoration, preparation, presentation of food and musical performance activities, etc. C2.1 Expression of local culture and traditions in the tourist accommodation establishment’s architecture, activities and services it provides C4 Reservation of biodiversity, ecosystem and landscapes C4.1 No catching of wild animals unless that activity aims at conservation purpose and is allowed by the law C4.2 No selling of souvenirs and food made from wild animals and plants protected by law and international protocols
  88. 88. Examples of Green Lotus criteria D Minimization of negative impacts on the environment D1 Resource conservation D1.1 Purchase of products packaged in bulk (wholesale) in order to reduce packaging and waste D1.16 Energy saving mode is set for computers or computer screens and “energy saving label” put on office equipment D2 Pollution minimization D2.4 Utilization of old bed sheet and cloths for other purposes D2.3 Re-usage of toilet paper and soap left-over in guests’ rooms
  89. 89. I need to wake up I need to shake up I need to speak out Something’s got to break up I’ve been asleep And I need to wake up Now I am not an island I am not alone I am my intentions Trapped here in this flesh and bone Oh I need to move I need to wake up I need to shake up I need to speak out Something’s got to break up I’ve been asleep And I need to wake up Now I want to change I need to shake up I need to speak out Something’s got to break up I’ve been asleep And I need to wake up Now Have I been sleeping? I’ve been so still Afraid of crumbling Have I been careless? Dismissing all the distant rumblings Take me where I am supposed to be To comprehend the things that I can’t see Cause I need to move I need to wake up I need to change I need to shake up I need to speak out Something’s got to break up I’ve been asleep And I need to wake up Now And as a child I danced like it was 1999 My dreams were wild The promise of this new world Would be mine Now I am throwing off the carelessness of youth To listen to an inconvenient truth That I need to move I need to wake up I need to change
  90. 90. Let’s finish with some more fast facts! • If energy makes up a quarter of your business costs, then a 20% energy savings reflects a 5% increase in overall profit1 • Every 1⁰C increase on the thermostat will increase energy use by about 15% in winter3 • Every 1⁰C decrease on the thermostat will increase energy use by about 10% in summer3 • You can save as much as 10% a year on your heating and cooling costs by simply turning the thermostat back by 1⁰C3 • Increasing a refrigerator’s temperature by only 1⁰C can reduce its energy consumption by 2-4%2 • Each tonne of paper that is recycled saves: Almost 13 trees; 2.5 barrels of oil ; 4100 kWh of electricity; 4 cubic metres of landfill; 31,780 litres of water3 (1) NSW Business Chamber 2009, Sustainability Toolkit – Hospitality, Australian Government – Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Australia (2) Carbon Trust, Hospitality saving energy without compromising service, Sector Overview (CTV013), Carbon Trust, UK, 2007 (3) Sustainability Victoria, HVAC TIPS (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning), http://www.sv.sustainability.vic.gov.au
  91. 91. Xin trân trọng cảm ơn! Thank you!

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