Smart Grid & Beyond

1,571 views

Published on

This presentation was given as part of the April 21, 2010 Northwest Clean Energy Resource Team meeting on Smart Grid Technology in Northwest Minnesota.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Smart Grid & Beyond

  1. 1. Smart Grid & Beyond Joe Jacobson  Eusco Gas/Water/Electricity Metering Backend Demand Response Programs Distribution  Automation and Asset  Water Heaters  Management and Switches Distributed Generation PHEV (Wind/Solar/Other) Charging  Programmable  Station Thermostats Energy Netmetering & Distributed Storage Gateways
  2. 2. Evolution of AMR to AMI 2‐way fixed AMI networks Remote Meter Reading Billing Schedules Off‐cycle Reads Customer‐Selected Billing Demand/ TOU/ Int. Data Benefits Power Quality Drive‐by AMR to  Tamper Indication increase  Outage/restoration Outside remotes & walk‐ productivity, reduce  Remote Trouble‐Shooting Hand‐held  by RF to eliminate  risk Connect/Disconnect computers to  accessibility problems reduce errors Demand Response Home Area Network Monthly Billing Cycle Support Functionality
  3. 3. “ PL C ” D iagram
  4. 4. One Utility's Approach • Apply today’s technology to today’s business  issues – Increasing generation costs – Increasing need for reliable electricity – Increased consumer desire to manage energy costs – Increased interest in conservation
  5. 5. Strategic Plan We shall be among the industry leaders by  maintaining a Technology Plan that provides for the  aggressive use of proven technology to enhance  reliability and member service while decreasing local  operating costs. – At least three technology advances will be made each year, supported  by a business plan, which will have a direct positive impact on the  membership.  
  6. 6. Our Strategic Plan • “Technology Plan” – Cross departmental 5 year technology plan • Not “Smart Grid” plan – Focused on key technologies to drive desired business outcomes. • “At least three technology advances will be made each year,  supported by a business plan, which will have a direct positive  impact on the membership” – AMI – SCADA – Web presentment (Google ‐ MS Hohm) – Outage status updates – Prepay
  7. 7. Reliability Options Information Consumption  Information Outage Restoration Outage Identification Theft Detection Line Loss Analysis Blink Analysis Voltage Analysis Transformer Loading Outage RestorationPre‐Pay On‐Line Web Presentment Billing Efficiencies Theft Detection Outage Restoration Outage Identification Outage Prevention Pre‐Pay Rate Development Blink Analysis Outage Identification Real‐Time Engineering Analysis On‐Line Web Presentment Outage Restoration Real‐Time Engineering Analysis Smart Grid Technologies
  8. 8. Customer Connection • Reliability – Reliability of electric delivery • Options – Billing options – Rate options • Load management/Demand response • Dynamic pricing (TOU/CPP/CPR) • Information – Information on electric usage – Information on ways to conserve
  9. 9. Reliability  • What we are doing now – Outage management (detection, restoration) – Analyzing Voltage • What we plan to do in the future
  10. 10. Reliability  • What we are doing now – Outage management (detection, restoration) – Analyzing Voltage – Analyzing Blinks – Transformer loading • What we plan to do in the future – Real‐time engineering analysis – Systematic approach to data analysis
  11. 11. Options • What we are doing now – Load management – Prepay (in process) • Future possibilities – Rate Options – Interactive demand response • “Points” for demand response
  12. 12. Information • What we are doing now – Daily usage on back of bill • What we plan to do in the future
  13. 13. Information • What we are doing now – Daily usage on back of bill – Web access to consumption information (Google)
  14. 14. Comments Received • First, kudos for taking the lead partnering with Google to make this power  data much more actionable. • GPM immediately indicated what I had long suspected, that I have a very  high (>1kWh) "always on" load, probably my furnace fan and whole house  air exchanger.  Already running a few tests to verify. • That sounds great and what a terrific thing you did by giving us the data  early! Kinda interesting to watch the power usage go down in relation to  the solar data we're collecting.  Thank you so much. • As you might suspect it leaves a lot to be desired for a guy like me, but it's a  start. I like the data connection, and the ability to download to excel.
  15. 15. Information • What we are doing now – Back of bill (daily) – Web access to consumption information (Google) – Use hourly meter data on bill questions • What we plan to do in the future – Multiple options for web access  (Google/Microsoft/Others) – Additional information on bill
  16. 16. Some Tools: • www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Dx38hzRWDQ &NR=1 • www.youtube.com/user/MicrosoftHohm#p/u /18/JO2DwoJohp8 • www.youtube.com/user/MicrosoftHohm#p/a /u/2/l_EcDjnzSe8
  17. 17. Let’s Start Now? • www.theenergydetective.com/ted‐5000‐faq.html • www.theenergydetective.com/ted‐5000‐live‐ Demo.html • www.navetas.com/technology/interactive‐ house‐demo.aspx
  18. 18. Impossible? • "Alice laughed: "There's no use trying," she  said; "one can't believe impossible things." • "I daresay you haven't had much practice,"  said the Queen. "When I was younger, I  always did it for half an hour a day. Why,  sometimes I've believed as many as six  impossible things before breakfast.“ • Alice in Wonderland.
  19. 19. Keys to Success • Company wide technology plan – Focused on fundamental business issues • Partnerships – We don’t have internal resources to do everything – We’ve relied upon other cooperatives and technology  partners • Communication without overselling – Let members know what your doing – Don’t oversell the impact
  20. 20. Summary • Our Approach to Smart Grid – Apply today’s technology to today’s business  environment • Smart Grid Member Impact – What does smart grid provide our members? • Reliability • Options • Information
  21. 21. In Home Display  (IHD)
  22. 22. Critical Peak Pricing
  23. 23. Time of Use Rates and  Load Control
  24. 24. Home Area Network ( HAN)  Load Control
  25. 25. HAN Architecture, Communications FlexServer Tower Direct  (future U‐SNAP opt.) Thermostat Display Sensus Backend RNI 30 Amp 5 Amp U‐SNAP  Load Switch Load Switch Radios Group Broadcast to Endpoints… TGB transmits DR commands in 10 sec (7X redundancy)
  26. 26. HAN, User Experience ‐ HTTPS ‐ Web HAN Displays Web Portal & Mobile  Water & Gas Monitor Use & Rate Tier Set Daily Alerts (Use/Cost)
  27. 27. DR – TOU & Load Control TOU Rates: • Current TOU Rate HAN devices listen for “their” meter 100 Colors
  28. 28. In Home Display • Supports TWACS® Outbound  Communications • 2 Line by 16 Character LCD Display • Audible and Visual Alert Indicators • Multi‐Lingual Support • Simple Sealed Design for Easy  deployment • Will Support – Prepayment – Regular Billing – Demand Response Notification – General Messaging
  29. 29. Prepayment Displays Account Balance 02-21-06 2:55AM Balance: $81.92 Avg. Daily Usage $2.37 Used Yesterday $2.76 Used This Month $67.93 Used Last Month Less Than 4 Days $139.93 Remaining
  30. 30. Demand Response Notification Rate Peaks Pending Peak 6-21-06 2:30 PM Active Peak $0.37692/kWh
  31. 31. General Messaging General Messaging Tornado Warning Until 7 PM Redman County Schools Closed Have a Happy 4TH of July! Cut-off Pending Make Purchase Broadcast or Single Point Addressable
  32. 32. Demand Response • Direct Load Control – Unobtrusive Control and Cycling – No customer over‐ride 975 MW of Instantaneous Load  Relief (FPL, 1995) • Critical Peak Pricing Notification – TOU Rates with CPP Days • Advance Alerts with Pricing – Customer decision to participate • Programmable Thermostat – Interface to 3rd party thermostats via  ZigBee™ HAN solution. – Customer over‐ride allowed
  33. 33. Critical Peak Pricing ‐ Notification
  34. 34. FPL Load Control Event Predicted Demand Profile SYSTEM LOAD (MW) Normal Load  More Generation Lost Control System re‐SCRAM Generation Lost Restoration System SCRAM Suspended 80 Minute Restoration Time-out Started Restoration Started TIME OF DAY 975 MW of Instantaneous Load  Relief (FPL, 1995)
  35. 35. DRU Key Features • Intelligent Comfort – Monitor average on/off times to provide profiles of individual devices  – Allow load for a percentage of average on time • Intelligent Outage Recovery – Power Interrupt feature Continues load shed after an outage • Cold Load Pick‐up – Prevents demand spikes as devices are brought back on‐line. • Autonomous Load Control – Provides 2 Under Frequency (UF) and 2 Under Voltage (UV) set points. • Each UV/UF set point contains trip and clear thresholds • Utility can control set points per substation • DRU’s can be programmed to react as needed ‐> e.g. shut‐off devices, simply  monitor  • System Diagnostics – Tamper Detection – Hardware & Firmware Diagnostics
  36. 36. Demand Response – Strategy  Definitions • Define your strategies and delivery points • Examples: – SCRAM • 100% Everything until stop command – Water Heaters • 20% Water heaters – LC Level 1 • 20% A/C • 50% Water heaters • 100% Irrigation – LC Level 2 • 50% A/C • 80% Water heaters • 100% Irrigation
  37. 37. Meter Outage info. • As a “front end” to existing Outage Management Systems • To get a fast data response from specific TWACS transponders. – Specific TWACS transponders can be: • Individual meter(s). • Random selections below specific protective devices • Entire Feeders  • Quickly identify the extent of an outage – 30‐40% of individual calls have power at meter (Internal Trouble) – Targeted “Pings” can “traverse” the distribution network to identify which devices  are without power • Verify that all meters affected by an outage have been restored – Especially beneficial in large storm restorations. – Crews complete an area before they move on. • Clear “nested outages” while crew is still on site.
  38. 38. New AMI Module Info.  • Demand Data – Billing (monthly) and daily demand 30 and 60 Minute Rolling Demand – Variable length and type • 15, 30 or 60 minute 3 0 • Block or rolling – Time and Date stamp 6 0 – Remotely reset • Power Quality 3:00       3:15         3:30         3:45          4:00        4:15         4:30         4:45         5:00 – Voltage snapshots – PQ data via user‐defined registers – Power outage counts (blink count) – Momentary and sustained outage  Outage Info Momentary Sustained counts and cumulative duration • Threshold configurable: 1‐7 minutes Frequency Count Count • Default: 5 minutes – Outage time/date stamp and  Duration Time Time duration information for 12 most  recent Sustained outages
  39. 39. Distribution Asset Analysis Provides hourly view of loading conditions – historical and forecasted – at any point  on a distribution network • Reduce device overloads and failures  • Improve timing and precision of  capital investments  • Improve phase balancing and circuit  utilization  • Improve voltage regulation and  capacitor placement • Improve asset sizing and consistency • Identify high line losses • Target customers for load control
  40. 40. Reclosers  200+ Recloser controls  DNP‐RTM  Cooper Form 4C, Form 6 & ABB  PCD 2000  SCADA‐Xchange  Benefits • Reduced SAIDI/MAIFI/CAIDI • Provides valuable data for planning  and asset management • Reduced O&M cost • Support DNP & 2179 protocols
  41. 41. ® Scada‐Mate Switch – PEPCO Reduced SAIDI and CAIDI Obtain valuable load data for  planning and asset  management Rapid and easy to deploy Fast, reliable two‐way  communication  PowerVista browser tools to  create alarms/status via e‐ mail, pager, text message
  42. 42. Faulted Circuit Indicator Solutions Underground Overhead  Dispatch Crews Directly to Faults  Improved Customer Satisfaction  Significantly Reduced Outage Time  Reduce O&M costs
  43. 43. Capacitor Banks Capacitor Automation Project  Improve reliability & efficiency  DNP 3.0 controls  Two‐way communications  Central control with fallback to local  Reduce capital and O&M costs  More than 2200 banks  QEI eCAP‐9040  Telemetric DNP‐RTM
  44. 44. Capacitor Banks  Improved reliability  Central control when required  Reduced O&M expenses  Deferred capital expenditures  Eliminated manual switching of seasonal banks  Better asset management
  45. 45. Power Reliability  Installed on 700+ feeders  Single phase voltage monitors  Reliability Reporting S/W - Pinpoints outages - Creates PUC Reports - SAIDI/MAIFI  Reports by: - Feeder - Substaion - Area/state
  46. 46. Voltage Regulators – Substation and Line Benefits  DR (conservation voltage reduction)  Optimize system for peak load periods  Obtain better planning information  Receive immediate notification of regulator  issues
  47. 47. Distributed Generation  Monitor and control  Reduced peak demand  Reduced time needed to get all generators  “online”  DSCADA/DMS/SCADA/EMS support
  48. 48. Demand Response Rolling Hills Rolling Hills Mankato, KS Irrigation load shedding  Reduced coincidental peak  Two‐way communications  Significant improvement over  time/temperature systems Benefits:  Reduced peak demand  Lower energy costs  Fast ROI
  49. 49. Voltage/Outage Monitoring 330+ Delivery Points  Monitor momentary and permanent  outages  Instant notification of OV/UV events Benefits  Improved response time  Better communication with  member coops
  50. 50. Questions? Thank you! Joe

×