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SIMPLE, FREE
TOOLS FOR
STUDENT
ENGAGEMENT
Who we are…
 Instructional
Designer,
World Campus
 hmd13@psu.edu
 Instructional
Designer,
ETS
 jel141@psu.edu
Heather ...
Today’s Agenda
 VoiceThread
 Instructor Videos
 Videos
 TED/YouTube
 Discussion Forums
 Blackboard
 Yammer
 Google...
VoiceThread
 Engage students with
visual and audio content
 Collaboration on
multimedia works
 Active learning exercise...
Instructor Videos
 Allows for personalization of
course section
 Puts face and personality to the
name
 Builds rapport ...
Video
 To demonstrate motion
 To make an emotional or
affective connection
 Keep it short (3-5
minutes is ideal)
 If u...
Ted and YouTube
 On demand access
to inspiring talks and
voices
 Vehicle for discovery
 Catalyst for
discourse and
anal...
Informal Discussion Boards
 General Course forum:
Students may post
general questions about
the course to faculty
and/or ...
Formal Discussion Boards
 Synthesis of material
 Exchange of ideas
 Demonstration of
understanding
 Set clear expectat...
Yammer
 Build a social community
 Peer teaching
 Intuitive threaded discussions
 Share files, photos, videos
 Student...
BlackBoard Collaborate
 Instructor use
 Guest speakers and virtual
office hours
 Online classes and test
review session...
Google Docs
 Group collaboration
 Group authoring
 Facilitate
presentations
 Version control
 Live messaging
 Determ...
Google Form example
Blogs
 Journal activity
 Allow students to
view and comment
on peers' creative
works
 Provide set up
instructions
 Pro...
Contact us
 Instructional
Designer,
World Campus
 hmd13@psu.edu
 Instructional
Designer,
World Campus
 jel141@psu.edu
...
Free Tools for Student Engagement
Free Tools for Student Engagement
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Free Tools for Student Engagement

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An overview of tools to use in online courses to engage students.

Published in: Education
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Free Tools for Student Engagement

  1. 1. SIMPLE, FREE TOOLS FOR STUDENT ENGAGEMENT
  2. 2. Who we are…  Instructional Designer, World Campus  hmd13@psu.edu  Instructional Designer, ETS  jel141@psu.edu Heather Dawson Julie Lang
  3. 3. Today’s Agenda  VoiceThread  Instructor Videos  Videos  TED/YouTube  Discussion Forums  Blackboard  Yammer  Google Docs  Blogs (Sites)  Tips for using each one Why use it Best practices
  4. 4. VoiceThread  Engage students with visual and audio content  Collaboration on multimedia works  Active learning exercises (doodling, commenting)  Deliver student accountable lectures  Peer topic discussions  Create a low stakes VT for students to try before moving on to bigger things  Follow up to ensure students "got it" the first time with VT  Have students comment using their voice  Encourage doodling Why Use It? Best Practices Brunvand, Stein and Byrd, Sara. (2011). Penn State VoiceThread. (2010).
  5. 5. Instructor Videos  Allows for personalization of course section  Puts face and personality to the name  Builds rapport with students  Allows students to “hear” your voice on future text-based communication  Provides venue for reaction to what is going on in the course and to help clear up confusion on course material or assignment details  Be casual and personable (remember, you are creating a first impression)  Keep them short!  Be creative in ways to integrate the subject matter in your video  Be sure to make them accessible (captioning/transcripts)  Consider shelf life; if you want to reuse semester after semester, avoid time-specific references Why Use Them? Best Practices Rose, Kathleen Kensinger (2009)
  6. 6. Video  To demonstrate motion  To make an emotional or affective connection  Keep it short (3-5 minutes is ideal)  If using PPT, keep in mind that it should not be a teleprompter or a lecture transcript  Provide a transcript Why Use Them? Best Practices Rose, Kathleen Kensinger (2009)
  7. 7. Ted and YouTube  On demand access to inspiring talks and voices  Vehicle for discovery  Catalyst for discourse and analysis  Align with learning outcomes  Provide strategies on how to promote active viewing  Provide students with a specific responsibility when viewing. Why Use Them? Best Practices Duffy, P. (2008).
  8. 8. Informal Discussion Boards  General Course forum: Students may post general questions about the course to faculty and/or other classmates  Current Issues forum: Instructor may post current events or hot topics happening in the news  Advertise the discussion and purpose  Encourage discussion board usage rather than email  Encourage subscriptions to the forum Why Use Them? Best Practices Motivating Students to Participate in Online Discus
  9. 9. Formal Discussion Boards  Synthesis of material  Exchange of ideas  Demonstration of understanding  Set clear expectations for participation  Assign discussion roles  Use a rubric  Ask clarifying or guiding questions  Write questions asking for opinions supported by facts Why Use Them? Best Practices Motivating Students to Participate in Online Discus
  10. 10. Yammer  Build a social community  Peer teaching  Intuitive threaded discussions  Share files, photos, videos  Students can easily contribute content to the course  Easy collaboration medium  Set up your notification preferences  Provide instructions and tips for students to set up their accounts and preferences  Set expectations for posts and activity  Is proper grammar and spelling required?  Must all posts be course-work related; are personal conversations encouraged?  Participate in the conversations Why Use It? Best Practices Vorvoreanu, Mihaela, Bowen, Erin E., Laux, Dawn D. (20
  11. 11. BlackBoard Collaborate  Instructor use  Guest speakers and virtual office hours  Online classes and test review sessions  Student use  Work in study groups  Complete peer review activities  Collaborate on group projects  Blackboard Plan and Publish  Create portable, reusable learning content  Create a high-definition video podcast, audio podcast or standalone recording.  Test your audio and video before the scheduled meeting time; ask participants to do the same  Get familiar with the tools and environment; plan your session accordingly  Set expectations of engagement in the session Why Use It? Best Practices McBrien, Lynn J., Jones, Phyllis, Cheng, Rui. (20
  12. 12. Google Docs  Group collaboration  Group authoring  Facilitate presentations  Version control  Live messaging  Determine naming convention  Don’t assume students are familiar with this technology  Provide access to basic training in using the tools  Check share settings Why Use It? Best Practices
  13. 13. Google Form example
  14. 14. Blogs  Journal activity  Allow students to view and comment on peers' creative works  Provide set up instructions  Provide a unique tag to be used for all posts (e.g. COMM180SP13)  Provide a link to an RSS feed (PSU Voices aggregator) Why Use Them? Best Practices
  15. 15. Contact us  Instructional Designer, World Campus  hmd13@psu.edu  Instructional Designer, World Campus  jel141@psu.edu Heather Dawson Julie Lang

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