Standard Music Font Layout
MusicXML community meeting
14 March 2014
Daniel Spreadbury
A brief history of music fonts
• First commercial music font was Sonata from Adobe in
1985, with 176 glyphs, organised mne...
Problems to be solved
• Lack of a real standard makes sharing
music fonts between applications difficult
• Sonata’s 170 gl...
What is SMuFL?
• A standard way of mapping musical symbols
to the Private Use Area of the Basic
Multilingual Plane in Unic...
What’s included
• 108 discrete sub-ranges of glyphs
• 2554 glyphs… and counting!
• Includes all 220 glyphs from the Unicod...
What’s included
Bravura
Bravura
• The first SMuFL font (OpenType/SVG/WOFF)
• Includes all SMuFL recommended glyphs, and
hundreds of optional glyph...
Current status
• Version 0.85; targeting 1.0 release in 1H
2014
• After 1.0, existing code points/glyph names
won’t change...
Current status
• Supported already in LilyPond by way of
openLilyLib
• Support coming in MuseScore 2.0,
Steinberg’s in-dev...
Font-specific JSON metadata
{
"fontName" : "Bravura”,
"fontVersion": "0.8",
"engravingDefaults": {
"staffLineThickness": 0...
Font-specific JSON metadata
More information
www.smufl.org
Thank you!
d.spreadbury@steinberg.de
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Standard Music Font Layout: Musikmesse 2014

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A presentation given at the MusicXML Community Meeting at the Musikmesse Frankfurt on 14 March 2014.

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Standard Music Font Layout: Musikmesse 2014

  1. 1. Standard Music Font Layout MusicXML community meeting 14 March 2014 Daniel Spreadbury
  2. 2. A brief history of music fonts • First commercial music font was Sonata from Adobe in 1985, with 176 glyphs, organised mnemonically for a Latin keyboard • Became de facto standard for mapping of most music fonts: e.g. Petrucci (Finale, 1988), Opus (Sibelius, 1993) • Range of 220 musical symbols was added to Unicode in 1998; to date, no font has completely implemented this Unicode range
  3. 3. Problems to be solved • Lack of a real standard makes sharing music fonts between applications difficult • Sonata’s 170 glyphs and Unicode’s 220 glyphs are insufficiently broad in scope • No agreement on how to expand beyond these initial sets
  4. 4. What is SMuFL? • A standard way of mapping musical symbols to the Private Use Area of the Basic Multilingual Plane in Unicode • A set of technical guidelines for how music fonts should be designed and built • Simple JSON metadata formats to help applications use SMuFL fonts easily • Released under MIT license, free to use/modify
  5. 5. What’s included • 108 discrete sub-ranges of glyphs • 2554 glyphs… and counting! • Includes all 220 glyphs from the Unicode Musical Symbols range • Also includes recommendations for ligatures, stylistic alternates/sets, etc.
  6. 6. What’s included
  7. 7. Bravura
  8. 8. Bravura • The first SMuFL font (OpenType/SVG/WOFF) • Includes all SMuFL recommended glyphs, and hundreds of optional glyphs • Released under the SIL Open Font License – Free to use, bundle, embed, create derivative versions, etc. – Only licensing restrictions are that the font cannot be sold on its own; derivative versions cannot use the same name; and derivative versions must be released under the same licensing terms
  9. 9. Current status • Version 0.85; targeting 1.0 release in 1H 2014 • After 1.0, existing code points/glyph names won’t change • Remaining milestones to 1.0 release – Technical guidelines for SMuFL fonts for text- based applications – Release of a version of Bravura for text-based applications
  10. 10. Current status • Supported already in LilyPond by way of openLilyLib • Support coming in MuseScore 2.0, Steinberg’s in-development scoring app, other as-yet unannounced projects • Bravura already shipping with commercial products, e.g. from Rising Software
  11. 11. Font-specific JSON metadata { "fontName" : "Bravura”, "fontVersion": "0.8", "engravingDefaults": { "staffLineThickness": 0.1, "stemThickness": 0.1, "beamThickness": 0.5, "beamSpacing": 0.25, ... }, "glyphs": { "noteheadBlack": { "stemDownNW": [ 0.0, -0.184 ], "stemUpSE": [ 1.328, 0.184 ] }, ... }, }
  12. 12. Font-specific JSON metadata
  13. 13. More information www.smufl.org
  14. 14. Thank you! d.spreadbury@steinberg.de

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