Constitutional Convention

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Notes 5: Constitutional Convention

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  • Powers; representation; slavery Preserve order but protect liberty
  • Powers; representation; slavery Preserve order but protect liberty
  • Powers; representation; slavery Preserve order but protect liberty
  • Presented by Edmond Randolph
  • Powers; representation; slavery Preserve order but protect liberty
  • Presented by Edmond Randolph
  • Powers; representation; slavery Preserve order but protect liberty
  • Powers; representation; slavery Preserve order but protect liberty
  • Presented by Edmond Randolph
  • Constitutional Convention

    1. 2. Delegates appointed to the convention <ul><li>74 </li></ul>
    2. 3. Attended the meetings regularly <ul><li>55 </li></ul>
    3. 4. Signed the document <ul><li>39 </li></ul>
    4. 5. Refused to sign the document <ul><li>3 </li></ul>
    5. 6. Average age of those in attendance <ul><li>42 </li></ul>
    6. 7. Years: Age of the youngest delegate, Jonathan Dayton <ul><li>27 </li></ul>
    7. 8. Years: Age of the oldest delegate, Benjamin Franklin <ul><li>81 </li></ul>
    8. 9. George Washington
    9. 10. James Madison
    10. 11. Alexander Hamilton
    11. 12. George Mason
    12. 13. Benjamin Franklin
    13. 14. Thomas Jefferson
    14. 15. John Adams
    15. 16. Patrick Henry
    16. 17. Charles Norris
    17. 18. When? May 25—September 17, 1787
    18. 19. Where? Independence Hall; Philadelphia, PA
    19. 20. Where? Independence Hall; Philadelphia, PA
    20. 21. Why? The Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation
    21. 22. Why? Major Points of Debate <ul><li>POWERS OF THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT/STATE GOVERNMENTS </li></ul><ul><li>LEGISLATIVE : Representation? Who elects? </li></ul><ul><li>EXECUTIVE : Number? Term length? Who elects? </li></ul><ul><li>JUDICIARY : How are courts created? </li></ul><ul><li>SLAVERY : Existence and representation? </li></ul><ul><li>A BILL OF RIGHTS? </li></ul>
    22. 24. Virginia Plan Presented by Edmund Randolph May 29; conceived by James Madison , “the Father of the Constitution”
    23. 25. Virginia Plan LEGISLATIVE EXECUTIVE JUDICIAL COUNCIL OF REVISION Supreme Tribunals Elected by the people Proportional representation based on population/tax Elected by state legislatures Elects Establishes Inferior Courts HOUSE SENATE VETO
    24. 26. New Jersey Plan Presented by William Paterson on June 13
    25. 27. New Jersey Plan LEGISLATIVE EXECUTIVE JUDICIAL Supreme Tribunals Equal representation; vote as a state Elected by state legislatures Elects Establishes Inferior Courts HOUSE <ul><li>Revision of the Articles </li></ul><ul><li>Empowers government to regulate commerce and collect revenue </li></ul>Multiple people
    26. 28. Hamilton’s Plan Britain? Dear George, … People are now willing to accept something not very remote from that which they have lately quitted… The British government is the best in the world.
    27. 29. The Great Compromise (Connecticut Compromise) Presented by Roger Sherman on July 5
    28. 30. The Great Compromise Equal representation LEGISLATIVE EXECUTIVE JUDICIAL Supreme Court Elected by the people Proportional representation based on population (65) Elected by state legislatures Establishes Inferior Courts HOUSE SENATE Appoints Elected by Electoral College <ul><li>“ A bundle of compromises” </li></ul><ul><li>Representation in Congress </li></ul><ul><li>Three-fifths compromise </li></ul><ul><li>4-year term for President </li></ul><ul><li>Judicial appointment, Senate approval of justices </li></ul>JUDICIAL REVIEW
    29. 31. Ratification <ul><li>Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists </li></ul><ul><li>9 out of 13 states needed to ratify </li></ul><ul><li>Two groups emerge </li></ul><ul><li>Federalists —for the ratification of the US Constitution; Anti-Federalists —opposed to its ratification </li></ul>
    30. 32. <ul><li>Arguments: The Anti-Federalists </li></ul><ul><li>Leading Anti-Federalists: Edmund Randolph, Patrick Henry, George Mason; leading state politicians </li></ul><ul><li>Why? </li></ul><ul><li>States would lose sovereignty </li></ul><ul><li>Too much Presidential power—monarchy, aristocracy </li></ul><ul><li>Republic: untested; US is too big </li></ul><ul><li>No Bill of Rights </li></ul>
    31. 33. <ul><li>Arguments: Federalist Defense </li></ul><ul><li>Leading Federalists: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay…write The Federalist Papers under the name Publius </li></ul><ul><li>A defense of the republican form of government over (direct) democracy </li></ul>
    32. 35. <ul><li>Victory in defeat for the Anti-Federalists </li></ul>Bill of Rights—first order of business for the new government; passed in 1791

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