NUTRITIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY-Learning for Success: JHARKHAND

594 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
594
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

NUTRITIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY-Learning for Success: JHARKHAND

  1. 1. LEARNING FOR SUCCESS: CONVERTING THE UNIQUE INTO THE UNIVERSAL TUSHAR KANT UPADHYAYA & V. P. SHARMA Golden Jubilee National Seminar On “DEVELOPMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY IN TWO DISTINCT TIME FRAMES: PRE- INDEPENDENT AND POST- INDEPENDENT PERIOD 17-19 DECEMBER, 2010
  2. 2. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY  The paper is based on secondary data and primary field work in Koderma district of Jharkhand.  The purpose of the paper is to report and evaluate the nutrition programmes run by the government of Jharkhand and suggest mitigation strategy for its success.
  3. 3. BACKGROUND  Jharkhand is a state with poor irrigation; almost 75% of the districts have been classified as being deprived of water.  This, combined with other socio- economic factors, has led to extreme food insecurity in the state especially among people living Below Poverty Line (BPL)causing malnutrition.
  4. 4. ANAEMIA AMONG CHILDREN 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 72 74 74 78 55 57 57 59 59 61 61 63 63 64 64 65 66 38 41 44 45 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 GO MN MZ KE HP AR DL JK SK WB UT TR MH TN MG OR PJ IN AS GJ RJ JH KA AP CH HR UP MP BH Children age 6-59 months who are anaemic (%)
  5. 5. CHILDREN’S NUTRITIONAL STATUS VARIES BY STATE Children under age 5 years who are underweight (%) 20 22 23 25 25 25 26 26 30 33 33 36 37 37 38 38 39 40 40 40 41 42 43 45 47 49 56 57 60 20 SK MZ MN KE PJ GO NA JK DL TN AP AR AS HP MH KA UT WB HR TR RJ OR UP IN GJ CH MG BH JH MP
  6. 6. PREVALENCE OF ANAEMIA IN WOMEN BY STATES 33 36 38 38 39 43 44 47 48 50 51 52 52 53 53 55 55 55 56 56 58 60 61 63 63 65 67 70 70 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 KR MN PU GO MZ HP DL MG MH UP ARP KN JK RJ TN UT India GJ MP HR CH SI OR AP WB TR BH JH AS
  7. 7. MICRONUTRIENT SUPPLEMENTATION PROGRAMMES  The government runs several micronutrient supplementation programmes in IFA and Vitamin A; nutrition programmes are also conducted through Anganwadi and Sub Centres for pregnant and lactating women, adolescent girls and children below the age of 6 years.
  8. 8. ---  Despite that, the Rapid Household Survey found that coverage of IFA tablets was very low, ranging from 1.9% to 32.5%; regular consumption of these tablets was even lower at 14.6%. The reason for such low compliance was lack of awareness of the importance of IFA in foetal growth.
  9. 9. NUTRITIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY  Nutritional anthropology refers to a field of study at the interface of anthropology and nutritional sciences focused particularly on understanding how the interactions of social and biological factors affect the nutritional status of individuals and populations.
  10. 10. MITIGATION STRATEGY  A significant body of Indian and global evidence supports that these interventions are the most critical and effective to improve nutrition security:  Focus on proven, essential nutrition interventions, the timely initiation of breastfeeding within one hour of birth, exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months of life, the timely introduction of age-appropriate complementary foods at six months (adequate in terms of quality, quantity and frequency), hygienic child feeding practices, improved nutrition for women (especially adolescent girls, pregnant women and lactating mothers), focusing on iron and folic acid supplements and de-worming, and timely, high quality therapeutic feeding and care for all children with severe acute malnutrition (with leadership from the Ministry of Women and Child Development).
  11. 11. MITIGATION STRATEGY  Focus on proven, essential primary health care interventions: full immunization, bi- annual vitamin A supplementation with de- worming for infants and young children, appropriate and active feeding of children during and after illness, including oral rehydration with zinc supplementation during diarrhea and timely, high quality therapeutic feeding and care for all children with severe acute malnutrition (with leadership from the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare).
  12. 12. MITIGATION STRATEGY  Promote personal hygiene, environmental sanitation, safe drinking water and food safety (with leadership from Ministry of Rural Development).  Integrate household food and nutrition security considerations into the design of cropping and farming systems (with leadership from the Ministry of Agriculture).  Expand and improve nutrition education and awareness as well as involvement and accountability for improved nutrition at the community level (with leadership from the Ministry of Women and Child Development and the Ministry of Panchayati Raj [local self government] and including others, such as the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting and the Department of Education).
  13. 13. CONVERGENCE (POSSIBILITIES WITH OTHER /RELATED EFFORTS)  Based on the Indian context and significant programming experience, following are the ways to improve nutrition.  Expand efforts to engage and empower vulnerable communities, particularly women in these communities, to overcome malnutrition (including through Gram Sabhas [local councils] and self help groups).  Ensure that nutrition related programmes focus on key nutrition outcomes and are reaching the priority target groups of children under two years of age, and women (especially adolescent girls, pregnant women and lactating mothers) in order to break the intergenerational cycle of malnutrition and to achieve the desired result
  14. 14. CONVERGENCE (POSSIBILITIES WITH OTHER /RELATED EFFORTS)  Strengthen the focus on improving nutrition through a leadership and coordination mechanism with clear authority and responsibility, working from local to state levels (possibly through a mechanism like a separate department of Nutrition).
  15. 15. LEARNING FOR SUCCESS: CONVERTING THE UNIQUE INTO THE UNIVERSAL  State Governments should develop a ‘Hunger Free State’ strategy, which adopts a life cycle approach to the delivery of nutrition support and reaches the key target groups and vulnerable sections of the population .With a special programme to prevent maternal, fetal and young child malnutrition.  Based on evidence and successful programming, it will be prudent to place special focus on Child Nutrition in the First Two Years of Life and Women’s Nutrition
  16. 16. IMMEDIATE ACTION PLAN:  Strengthening the BCC component of the ongoing programs (Community Health Awareness, JBSY)  Facilitate development of community level BCC strategy  Strengthening IFA and de-worming programs  Enhancing counseling skills of Anganwadi workers and their supervisors  ANM and their supervisors capacity building to ensure the convergence of efforts at the site level
  17. 17. IMMEDIATE ACTION PLAN:  Sensitizing the community on equality of the gender and more attention towards a girl child   Activating the village health committees envisaged in the Panchayati Raj set-up at the panchayat level after Panchayat election In Jharkhand.  Fixed day Village Health and Nutrition Day which would include all the services supposed to be provided at village level including RI and other services as envisaged in NRHM concept paper.
  18. 18. Thank You

×