Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Safe computing (circa 2004)

My lecture note on safe computing, circa 2004. Reposted for the notes on SIRCAM virus.

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Safe computing (circa 2004)

  1. 1. Jabatan Kesihatan Masyarakat Cheapskate's Guide to a Safe PC Dr Azmi Mohd Tamil
  2. 2. © Introduction • http://www.wired.com/news/print/0, 1294,62222,00.html • MyDoom virus-laden e-mails may no longer be clogging inboxes, but each of those infected computers now contains a backdoor that allows any malicious hacker with a modicum of technical skills to remotely access and control the infected machines.
  3. 3. © Data Protection • From Viruses - explorer.zip, SirCam, Nimda, MyDoom • From Spyware • Malicious Intrusion - hackers, crackers, use of trojan viruses • Unplanned Disasters - need for backups
  4. 4. © Protection From Intrusion • First up, firewalls. If you're only going to run one security application, then make it a firewall, which acts as a sort of watchdog for your computer, alerting you to and blocking the entrance or exit of unwelcome visitors. • ZoneAlarm is the most popular free firewall. • Agnitum's Outpost free firewall is easy to install and uses plug-in software modules to add to or enhance its features.
  5. 5. © Data Protection • http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,45581,00.html • In Order to Have Your Advice • By Jon Rochmis • 2:00 a.m. July 27, 2001 PDT • “And, by the way, hats off to the FBI guy who opened the SirCam virus. His computer proceeded to send the virus -- and random FBI documents -- to e-mail addresses stored in his computer as well as throughout the entire National Infrastructure Protection Center, which, it just so happens, was established to protect the United States' computer networks.”
  6. 6. © Data Protection
  7. 7. © Protection From Viruses • Install a good anti-virus program • Update it daily if possible, if not every fortnight • Update yourself on virus information ie http://www.wired.com, http://www.cert.org • Never ever click on an attachment esp .exe, .bat, .vbs, .lnk, .pif, sent via e-mail, unless you’re expecting it
  8. 8. © Anti Virus • Free antivirus applications are also available, but brand-new viruses can and do slip past scanners until companies can analyze the new virus's code and release an upgrade that will block it. Given that limitation, antivirus tools are good at protecting computers against known viruses, but should never be considered bulletproof.
  9. 9. © Spy-Ware • You've checked your computer for viruses but you're still struggling with application crashes, slowed performance, slews of pop-up ads even when you're not browsing the Web, a home or start page that's been changed to some odd search site, or other "ghost in the machine" sorts of mishaps, chances are your computer harbors spyware, adware or a Trojan Horse. • All of these programs purport to be some useful or fun tool, but actually hand over some level of control over your computer to an outside entity.
  10. 10. © Anti Spy-Ware • The best program to handle spyware or Trojans is Spybot-Search & Destroy. Spybot effectively and easily removes virtually every sneaky piece of software in existence. Run it weekly. • I myself uses Lavasoft Ad-Aware.
  11. 11. © Avoid Microsoft • Last but not least, one of the best all- around free security tools is Mozilla's browser and e-mail applications. Since so many viruses, worms and Internet exploits are aimed at Microsoft applications, switching to these open- source programs can help you avoid problems. • The browser also has built-in pop-up blocking and advanced, configurable privacy and security tools.
  12. 12. © Data Protection
  13. 13. © Disaster Recovery • Use of data backup software • Use of data replication software • If possible, store backups off-site • Duplicating data (mirroring) using 2 powerful servers, one sited off-site • “Hot-site” mirroring
  14. 14. © Data Safekeeping • Repositories. These are responsible for holding data and other information assets and preparing them for reuse.
  15. 15. © Conclusion • The use of computers in education has improved the learning & education process. • But without the proper strategies or precautions, it may impede education, instead of helping us.
  16. 16. Jabatan Kesihatan Masyarakat Terima Kasih

    Be the first to comment

My lecture note on safe computing, circa 2004. Reposted for the notes on SIRCAM virus.

Views

Total views

187

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

0

Actions

Downloads

1

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×