Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Influence - The Psychology of Persuasion

5,771 views

Published on

A presentation on Prof. Robert Cialdini's book 'Influence - The Psychology of Persuasion.

Published in: Business, Technology, Education
  • If you want to download or read this book, copy link or url below in the New tab ......................................................................................................................... DOWNLOAD FULL PDF EBOOK here { http://bit.ly/2m6jJ5M } .........................................................................................................................
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • If you want to download or read this book, Copy link or url below in the New tab ......................................................................................................................... DOWNLOAD FULL PDF EBOOK here { http://bit.ly/2m6jJ5M } ......................................................................................................................... Download EPUB Ebook here { http://bit.ly/2m6jJ5M } ......................................................................................................................... Download Doc Ebook here { http://bit.ly/2m6jJ5M } ......................................................................................................................... .........................................................................................................................
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Influence - The Psychology of Persuasion

  1. 1. Professor Emeritus of Psychology andMarketing, Arizona State University.
  2. 2. This is a stunner — no self-respectingcommunicator or manager should bewithout this book!"For marketers, this book is among themost important books written in the lastten years."— Journal of Marketing Research"Influence should be required reading forall business majors."— Journal of Retailing"This book will strike chords deep in thehearts and psyches of all of us."— Best Sellers Magazine"The material in Cialdinis Influence is aproverbial gold mine."— Journal of Social and ClinicalPsychologyHarvard Business Review lists Dr.Cialdinis research in "Breakthrough Ideasfor Todays Business Agenda".
  3. 3. PersuasionPsychological Principles Image: Desktopedia
  4. 4. Image: Ludwig Gatzke: Flickr
  5. 5. Information explosion• Internet, TV and mobile phones have shrunk the boundaries between cultures and countries.• Even a common man is bombarded with new information on complex matter considered to be highly technical. Image::Eneko via Wikimedia commons
  6. 6. Image:Monobi via Wikimedia commons
  7. 7. Image: Marlith via Wikimedia commons
  8. 8. Image: Flickr
  9. 9. Explosion in Choices• What is important and what is not?• Technology advances and race to increase market share – Plethora of choices – Shortening of product life cycle• Sellers’ job is progressively becoming more difficult.
  10. 10. Image: Filmitadka via Wikimedia How people choose?
  11. 11. Weapons of InfluenceImage:André Brouillet via Wikimedia commons
  12. 12. Animal Kingdom
  13. 13. Image: Kevin Cole via Wikimedia
  14. 14. Choices are made uponautomatic fixed-action patterns instincts
  15. 15. Image: P puppala_2 via Flickr
  16. 16. Image: Jhartenfeld via Wikimedia Image: Metthew Walsh via Wikimedia commons
  17. 17. Image: Malcyzk via Flickr Image: Wikimedia
  18. 18. Fixed-action patterns are cost- effective life strategy for human too.Human, too, have similar fixed-action patterns; stereotype behavior
  19. 19. Why stereotyped behavior?• We exist in extraordinary complicated stimulus environment – so many choices, so much information – We need shortcuts – Stereotyping • Classifying things according to key features • Save us from analyzing multiple aspects of events, persons, situations• Most efficient form of behaving; and many times, a necessity
  20. 20. Common Stereotypes
  21. 21. JustBecause…
  22. 22. Expensive = Better
  23. 23. Study: $90 wine tastes betterthan the same wine at $10 5 4 $90Liking  3 2 1 $10 0 Expensive = Better
  24. 24. Expectations canturn anything fromWorthless to Priceless
  25. 25. Perceptual Contrast
  26. 26. ‘These Stereotypes’ can be usedas a powerful weapon to influence.
  27. 27. Weapons of influence Six basic categories
  28. 28. Image; Hans Thoma via Wikimedia Easy things nobody wants, but what is forbidden is tempting. Ovid
  29. 29. Image: Robert Broadie : Wikimedia 6. Scarcity – rule of the few
  30. 30. 6. Scarcity ‘the rule of the few’• Things seem more valuable to us when their availability is limited.• We want something even more when we are in competition for it.• Limited period offer or limited number availability
  31. 31. 6. Scarcity ‘the rule of the few’• Things seem more valuable to us when their availability is limited.• We want something even more when we are in competition for it.• Limited period offer or limited number availability or unique feature increases demand.
  32. 32. 5. Authority
  33. 33. If an ‘expert’ said so, it must be true.
  34. 34. 5. Authority• People have a deep-seated sense of duty to authority.• Studies demonstrate that adults will do extreme things when instructed to do so by an authority figure.
  35. 35. 5. Authority• Titles• Uniforms• Clothes• Trappings of status
  36. 36. 4. Likeability We prefer to say yes tosomeone we know and like. Image: Al Wilson
  37. 37. 4. Likeability - factors• Attractiveness – Halo effect• Similarity Opinion, life-style, background, association, personality traits• Familiarity – Repeated contact• Praise/compliments
  38. 38. 3. Social Proof Where all think alike,no one thinks very much. -Walter Lippmann Image: Freewalpapers @sodek
  39. 39. 3. Social Proof• Common method people use to determine what is correct is to find out what other people think is correct.• The greater number of people who find an idea correct, the more the idea will be correct.• Pluralistic ignorance: each person decides that since nobody is concerned, nothing much is wrong• Similarity: social proof operates most powerfully when people observe people just like them.
  40. 40. 3. Social Proof Examples• Laugh tracks (canned laughter)• Advertisement use actors that look- alike to potential user• Testimonials• Werther effect
  41. 41. Image: Wikimedia
  42. 42. 2. Consistency Image: Flickr
  43. 43. 2. Consistency• People have a desire to be and look consistent within their words, beliefs, attitudes and deeds.• Those pressure will call them to respond in ways that justify their earlier decision.• People often fool themselves, from time to time, in order to keep their thoughts and belief consistent with what they have already done or decided.
  44. 44. 2. Consistency Applications• Elicit a commitment, then expect consistency – Small purchase – Asking about benefits of a product/service• Public, active, effortful commitments tend to be lasting commitments – Getting a written feedback about a product – Asking customer to write down what they like about the product
  45. 45. Image:tipacan
  46. 46. 1. Reciprocation Image: tinycafeblogspot
  47. 47. 1. Reciprocation‘Web of indebtedness’ is a uniqueadaptive mechanism of human beings,allowing for the division of labor, exchangeof goods, services (making experts todevelop), and the creation of cluster ofinterdependencies that binds individualstogether to highly efficient units.
  48. 48. 1. ReciprocationOne of the most potent weapons ofinfluence and compliance: People want to repay, in kind, what another person has provided them. The Old Give and Take….and Take.
  49. 49. 1. Reciprocation A. Give and take.. and takeInternal discomfort and external shame puta lot of psychological pressure, and peopleend up returning a small favor by a bigone.
  50. 50. 1. Reciprocation B. Reciprocal concession• If someone makes a concession, people are obligated to respond with a concession• Making a concession gives the other party a feeling of responsibility for the outcome and greater satisfaction with resolution
  51. 51. Obligation to receiveAlthough the obligation to repayconstitutes the essence of thereciprocation rule, it is obligation to receivethat makes the rule so easy to exploit.There is an obligation to give, anobligation to receive, and an obligation torepay.
  52. 52. Obligation to receiveAlthough the obligation to repayconstitutes the essence of thereciprocation rule, it is obligation to receivethat makes the rule so easy to exploit.There is an obligation to give, anobligation to receive, and an obligation torepay.
  53. 53. Obligation to receiveAlthough the obligation to repayconstitutes the essence of thereciprocation rule, it is obligation to receivethat makes the rule so easy to exploit.There is an obligation to give, anobligation to receive, and an obligation torepay.
  54. 54. Obligation to receiveAlthough the obligation to repayconstitutes the essence of thereciprocation rule, it is obligation to receivethat makes the rule so easy to exploit.There is an obligation to give, anobligation to receive, and an obligation torepay.
  55. 55. Obligation to receiveAlthough the obligation to repayconstitutes the essence of thereciprocation rule, it is obligation to receivethat makes the rule so easy to exploit.There is an obligation to give, anobligation to receive, and an obligation torepay.
  56. 56. Six basic categories1. Reciprocation2. Consistency3. Social proof4. Authority5. Likeability6. Scarcity/Novelty
  57. 57. Image: Olof Senestam via Wikimedia Study extensively, inquire carefully,ponder thoroughly, scrutinize closely, and practice earnestly. Confucius
  58. 58. Thank YouHope you arebenefited from thispresentation. Youcan get transcript ofthis presentationfrom my website.

×