SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 124
Download to read offline
HEALING
THROUGH
NUTRITION
-IN ALL PLANES
OF BEING
DR. SHRUTI BAID
MD. NUTRITION AND DIETETICS
JR1
INTRODUC
TION
The phrase "healing through
nutrition in all planes of being"
suggests a holistic approach to
healing that incorporates nutrition
as a fundamental aspect across
various aspects of a person's
existence. Let's break it down:
Healing
Refers to the process of restoring health,
balance, or well-being. It involves
addressing physical, mental, emotional, or
spiritual imbalances to promote overall
wellness.
Constructive principle: Naturopathy is
a system of man building in harmony
with the constructive principles of
Nature on physical, mental, moral and
spiritual planes of living
Destructive principle: It is that
principle which disintegrates and
destroys the existing forms and types
and whose activity in nature is
designated as devolutionary.
NUTRITION
Relates to the intake of nourishing
substances through food or supplements.
Proper nutrition provides the body with
essential nutrients for growth, development,
and maintenance of bodily functions.
Nutrition is necessary for healing
because it provides the energy and
nutrients that your body needs to repair
and rebuild damaged tissues.
Nutrition also helps to prevent
infection and complications that can
slow down or impair wound
healing. Some of the nutrients that are
especially important for wound healing
are protein, iron, zinc, and vitamins A
and C.
PLANES OF
BEING
The concept of "planes of being" is
often associated with spiritual or
philosophical frameworks that describe
different dimensions or levels of
existence beyond the physical realm.
These planes are thought to
encompass various aspects of
consciousness, existence, and spiritual
development.
The interpretation and understanding
of planes of being can vary across
different belief systems and
philosophical perspectives.
According to WHO, health has been defined as "a state of
complete physical, mental and social well-being and not
merely the absence of disease or infirmity"
There are four planes of being:-
1. PHYSICAL PLANE
2. MENTAL PLANE
3. EMOTIONAL PLANE
4. SPIRITUAL PLANE
PHYSICAL
PLANE
This is the plane of existence
that encompasses the
material world and the
physical body. It includes the
tangible and observable
aspects of life, such as the
physical environment, sensory
experiences, and biological
processes.
MENTAL
PLANE
This plane relates to the
realm of thoughts, emotions,
and cognition. It involves the
mind and psychological
processes, including
perception, reasoning,
memory, and the formation
of beliefs and attitudes.
EMOTIONAL
PLANE
The emotional plane refers to
the realm of feelings,
emotions, and the subjective
experience of different
emotional states.
It involves the awareness and
expression of emotions, such
as joy, sadness, love, anger,
and compassion.
SPIRITUAL
PLANE
This plane relates to the realm of
spirituality, consciousness, and
transcendence.
It encompasses the search for
meaning, purpose, and
connection to a higher power or
universal consciousness.
It involves aspects such as self-
awareness, personal growth, and
the exploration of metaphysical
or transcendent experiences.
PHYSICAL HEALING
Physical healing refers to the process of restoring and repairing the physical body to a
state of health and well-being after an injury, illness, or medical intervention.
It involves the recovery of damaged tissues, restoration of bodily functions, and
overall improvement in physical health.
RECOVERY OF
DAMAGED TISSUE
A. TISSUE REPAIR
• Tissue Repair: When the body is
injured, damaged tissues undergo
a healing process.
• This process involves various
stages, including inflammation,
tissue regeneration, and
remodeling.
• Cells at the site of injury multiply,
new blood vessels form, and
collagen is synthesized to rebuild
and strengthen the damaged area.
NUTRITION
AND
TISSUE
REPAIR
Nutrition plays a critical role in
tissue repair and wound healing.
The body requires specific
nutrients to support the healing
process and facilitate the repair of
damaged tissues.
1. Proteins
2. Vitamin C
3. Vitamin A
4. Zinc
5. Omega 3 Fatty acid
1. PROTEIN AND
WOUND HEALING
Proteins provide the main building blocks for
tissue growth, cell renewal, and repair
throughout the wound healing process.
Proteins significantly affect the entire process
of wound healing through their roles in RNA
and DNA synthesis, collagen and elastic tissue
formation, immune system function, epidermal
growth, and keratinization. Therefore, it is vital
to provide proteins for wound healing.
Proteins like interleukins and chemokines are
released during the inflammatory phase of wound
healing. They help recruit immune cells to the
wound site and regulate the inflammatory
response.
Certain proteins, such as transforming growth
factor-beta (TGF-β) and platelet-derived growth
factor (PDGF), are released by platelets
and immune cells. They promote cell migration,
proliferation, and angiogenesis (formation of
new blood vessels) in the wound area.​
Proteins like collagen, fibronectin, and elastin
form the structural framework of the ECM,
which provides support for cell migration
and tissue regeneration.​
Proteins like vascular endothelial growth factor
(VEGF) stimulate the growth of new blood
vessels into the wound, providing oxygen
and nutrients necessary for healing.​
Wang, X., Yu, Z., Zhou, S., Shen, S., & Chen, W. (2022). The Effect of a Compound Protein on Wound Healing and Nutritional Status. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine :
eCAM, 2022, 4231516. https://doi.org/10.1155/2022/4231516
2. VITAMIN C AND
WOUND HEALING
Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid (AA), is
involved in all phases of wound healing.
In the inflammatory phase it is required for
neutrophil apoptosis and clearance.
During the proliferative phase, AA contributes
towards synthesis, maturation, secretion and
degradation of collagen.
Deficiencies affect the maturation phase by altering
collagen production and scar formation.
The body strives to maintain homeostasis of AA,
thereby ensuring availability for collagen synthesis.
After wounding, plasma and tissue levels of AA
diminish and, as a consequence, supplements may be
useful for healing
Moores J. Vitamin C: a
wound healing
perspective. Br J
Community Nurs. 2013
Dec;Suppl:S6, S8-11. doi:
10.12968/bjcn.2013.18.su
p12.s6. PMID: 24796079.
Vitamin A functions mostly through nuclear retinoic acid
receptors, retinoid X receptors, and peroxisome proliferator-
activated receptors.
Retinoids regulate the growth and differentiation of many cell
types within skin, and its deficiency leads to abnormal epithelial
keratinization.
In wounded tissue, vitamin A stimulates epidermal turnover,
increases the rate of re-epithelialization, and restores epithelial
structure.
Retinoids have the unique ability to reverse the inhibitory effects
of anti-inflammatory steroids on wound healing.
retinoic acid has been demonstrated to enhance production of
extracellular matrix components such as collagen type I and
fibronectin, increase proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts,
and decrease levels of degrading matrix metalloproteinases.
Polcz ME, Barbul A. The
Role of Vitamin A in Wound
Healing. Nutr Clin Pract.
2019 Oct;34(5):695-700.
doi: 10.1002/ncp.10376.
Epub 2019 Aug 7. PMID:
31389093.
3. VITAMIN A AND WOUND HEALING
4. ZINC AND WOUND HEALING
Zinc is a micronutrient that is essential to human
health. Zinc plays a major role in regulating every
phase of the wound healing process; ranging from
membrane repair, oxidative stress, coagulation,
inflammation and immune defense, tissue are-
epithelialization, angiogenesis, to fibrosis/scar
formation.
ZINC RICH SOURCES ARE:
1. Legumes
2. Nuts
3. Wholegrains (quinoa, oats, wheat, rice)
4. Eggs
5. Dark chocolates
6. Dairy
Lin, P. H., Sermersheim, M., Li, H., Lee, P.
H. U., Steinberg, S. M., & Ma, J. (2017).
Zinc in Wound Healing
Modulation. Nutrients, 10(1), 16.
https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010016
B. Immune Response
The immune system plays a crucial
role in physical healing. It helps to
fight off infections, remove
debris, and support tissue repair.
Inflammation is a natural part of
the immune response and is
necessary for healing, but excessive
or prolonged inflammation
can delay the healing process.
NUTRITION AND IMMUNE
RESPONSE
Nutrition plays a vital role in supporting immune
response.
A well-balanced diet, rich in essential nutrients,
helps maintain a strong and efficient immune
system.
some key nutrients and their roles in supporting
immune function:
1.Protein
2.Vitamin C
3.Vitamin D
4.Zinc
5.Probiotics
6.Antioxidants Childs, C. E., Calder, P. C., & Miles, E. A.
(2019). Diet and Immune
Function. Nutrients, 11(8), 1933.
https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081933
1. PROTEIN AND IMMUNE RESPONSE
Li P, Yin YL, Li D, Kim SW, Wu G. Amino acids and immune function. Br J Nutr.
2007 Aug;98(2):237-52. doi: 10.1017/S000711450769936X. Epub 2007 Apr 3.
PMID: 17403271.
2. VITAMIN C AND IMMUNE RESPONSE
Vitamin C contributes to immune defense by
supporting various cellular functions of both the
innate and adaptive immune system.
Vitamin C supports epithelial barrier function
against pathogens and promotes the oxidant
scavenging activity of the skin, thereby potentially
protecting against environmental oxidative stress.
It accumulates in phagocytic cells, such as
neutrophils, and can enhance chemotaxis,
phagocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species,
and ultimately microbial killing.
It is also needed for apoptosis and clearance of the
spent neutrophils from sites of infection by
macrophages, thereby decreasing necrosis/NETosis
and potential tissue damage. Carr, A. C., & Maggini, S. (2017). Vitamin C
and Immune Function. Nutrients, 9(11),
1211. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9111211
3. VITAMIN D AND IMMUNE
RESPONSE
Vitamin D has numerous effects on cells within the
immune system. It inhibits B cell proliferation and blocks
B cell differentiation and immunoglobulin secretion.
Vitamin D additionally suppresses T cell proliferation and
results in a shift from a Th1 to a Th2 phenotype.
Furthermore, it affects T cell maturation with a skewing
away from the inflammatory Th17 phenotype and
facilitates the induction of T regulatory cells.
These effects result in decreased production of
inflammatory cytokines (IL-17, IL-21) with increased
production of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10.
Vitamin D also has effects on monocytes and dendritic
cells (DCs). It inhibits monocyte production of
inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and
TNFα
Aranow C. (2011). Vitamin D and the immune system. Journal of
investigative medicine : the official publication of the American
Federation for Clinical Research, 59(6), 881–886.
https://doi.org/10.2310/JIM.0b013e31821b8755
4. ZINC AND IMMUNE RESPONSE
Zinc affects multiple aspects of the immune
system. Zinc is crucial for normal
development and function of cells
mediating innate immunity, neutrophils,
and NK cells.
Macrophages also are affected by zinc
deficiency. Phagocytosis, intracellular
killing, and cytokine production all are
affected by zinc deficiency.
Zinc deficiency adversely affects the growth
and function of T and B cells.
The ability of zinc to function as an anti-
oxidant and stabilize membranes suggests
that it has a role in the prevention of free
radical-induced injury during inflammatory
processes.
Prasad A. S. (2008). Zinc in human health: effect of zinc on
immune cells. Molecular medicine (Cambridge,
Mass.), 14(5-6), 353–357. https://doi.org/10.2119/2008-
5. PROBIOTICS AND IMMUNE RESPONSE
Probiotics regulate host innate and
adaptive immune responses by modulating
the functions of dendritic cells,
macrophages, and T and B lymphocytes.
One of the mechanisms of probiotics
regulating immunomodulatory functions is
through the activation of toll-like
receptors.
Yan, F., & Polk, D. B. (2011). Probiotics and immune
health. Current opinion in gastroenterology, 27(6), 496–
501. https://doi.org/10.1097/MOG.0b013e32834baa4d
6. ANTIOXIDANTS AND IMMUNE
RESPONSE
• Antioxidants, such as
vitamins A and E, selenium,
and flavonoids, help protect
immune cells from oxidative
stress.
• They are found in colorful
fruits and vegetables, nuts,
seeds, and whole grains.
Bendich A. Physiological role of antioxidants in the
immune system. J Dairy Sci. 1993 Sep;76(9):2789-
94. doi: 10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(93)77617-1. PMID:
8227682.
Mental healing, also known as psychological healing, refers to the
process of addressing and recovering from emotional or psychological
distress, trauma, or imbalances. It involves taking steps to restore and
promote mental well-being.
MENTAL HEALING
GUT – BRAIN
AXIS
The brain and stomach are
intricately connected
through a bidirectional
communication pathway
known as the gut-brain axis.
This axis involves complex
interactions between the
central nervous system
(CNS), which includes the
brain and spinal cord, and
the enteric nervous system
(ENS), which is a network of
neurons within the
gastrointestinal (GI) tract.
Vagus Nerve: The vagus nerve is the primary pathway through which signals are transmitted between the gut and the brain.
It is the longest cranial nerve and connects various organs in the gut, including the stomach and intestines, to the brain. The
vagus nerve carries signals in both directions, allowing for bidirectional communication.
Neurotransmitters and Hormones: The gut produces and releases various neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine,
and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which play essential roles in regulating mood, emotions, and cognitive function.
Hormones such as ghrelin, leptin, and cholecystokinin, which are involved in appetite regulation, are also part of the gut-
brain axis.
Gut Microbiota: The gut is home to a vast community of microorganisms, collectively known as the gut microbiota. These
microbes have a symbiotic relationship with the host and play a crucial role in gut health and overall well-being. The gut
microbiota produces neurotransmitters, vitamins, and short-chain fatty acids that can influence brain function and behavior.
Immune System: The gut is a significant component of the immune system, and immune cells in the gut interact with the
nervous system. Immune activation in the gut can influence brain function and has been linked to the development of
psychiatric and neurological disorders.
Stress Response: The gut-brain axis is closely involved in the body's response to stress. Stressful experiences can lead to
changes in gut motility, secretion, and permeability. Conversely, disturbances in the gut, such as dysbiosis (imbalances in the
gut microbiota) or inflammation, can activate stress pathways and impact brain function, potentially contributing to anxiety,
depression, or other stress-related disorders
GUT DYSBIOSIS
AND DEPRESSION
The mechanisms underlying the association between
gut dysbiosis, and depression are still being studied,
but several potential mechanisms have been
proposed.
• Inflammation:
Dysbiosis can lead to a disruption of the intestinal
barrier, resulting in increased intestinal permeability
(leaky gut). This can allow the translocation of
bacterial components into the bloodstream, triggering
an immune response and systemic inflammation.
Chronic inflammation has been linked to the
development and progression of depression.
• Neurotransmitter Alterations:
The gut microbiota plays a role in the production and
regulation of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin,
dopamine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA),
which are involved in mood regulation. Dysbiosis can
affect the balance of these neurotransmitters,
potentially contributing to depressive symptoms.
• HPA Axis Dysregulation: The gut microbiota
influences the hypothalamic-pituitary-
adrenal (HPA) axis, which is involved in the
regulation of the body's stress response.
Dysbiosis can affect HPA axis function,
leading to dysregulation of stress hormone
production, such as cortisol. Altered HPA
axis activity has been implicated in the
development of depression.
• Serotonin Pathway: Serotonin, often
referred to as the "happy hormone," is
primarily produced in the gut. Dysbiosis can
affect serotonin production and metabolism,
potentially influencing mood and
contributing to depressive symptoms.
Zheng, P., Zeng, B., Zhou, C., Liu, M., Fang, Z., Xu, X., Zeng, L., Chen, J., Fan, S., Du, X., Zhang, X., Yang,
D., Yang, Y., Meng, H., Li, W., Melgiri, N., Licinio, J., Wei, H., & Xie, P. (2016). Gut microbiome
remodeling induces depressive-like behaviors through a pathway mediated by the host’s metabolism.
Molecular Psychiatry. https://doi.org/10.1038/mp.2016.44.
Nutrition can play a role in supporting mental health
and potentially alleviating symptoms of depression.
While a healthy diet alone cannot cure depression, it
can complement other treatment approaches and
contribute to overall well-being. Here are some ways
in which nutrition can be relevant to depression:
1.Balanced Diet
2.Omega 3 Fatty Acid
3.Vitamin B
4.Antioxidant
5.Tryptophan
6.Probiotics and Prebiotics
Li Y, Lv MR, Wei YJ, Sun L, Zhang JX, Zhang HG, Li B. Dietary patterns and depression risk: A meta-analysis. Psychiatry
Res. 2017 Jul;253:373-382. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.04.020. Epub 2017 Apr 11. PMID: 28431261.
BALANCED DIET AND DEPRESSION
• A balanced diet can also affect mental health, as some nutrients are
involved in the production and regulation of neurotransmitters, such
as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, which affect mood,
cognition and behavior. Some studies have suggested that a
balanced diet can help reduce the risk of depression and improve its
symptoms.
• Some general principles of a balanced diet are:
• Eating a variety of foods from different food groups, such as fruits,
vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, low-fat dairy products, nuts,
seeds and healthy fats.
• Eating more plant-based foods than animal-based foods, as they
provide more antioxidants, fiber and phytochemicals that can protect
against oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain.
• Eating moderate amounts of carbohydrates, preferably from complex
sources such as whole grains, legumes and starchy vegetables, as
they provide glucose for the brain and can enhance serotonin levels.
• Eating adequate amounts of protein, preferably from lean
sources such as fish, poultry, eggs and soy products, as they
provide amino acids for the synthesis of neurotransmitters.
• Eating adequate amounts of healthy fats, especially omega-3
fatty acids from fish, flaxseeds, walnuts and canola oil, as they
are essential for the structure and function of neuronal
membranes and can modulate the serotonin and dopamine
systems.
• Eating adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals, especially B
vitamins (such as folate, B6 and B12), vitamin D, selenium and
zinc, as they are cofactors for various enzymes involved in
neurotransmitter synthesis and metabolism.
• Limiting the intake of processed foods, refined sugars,
saturated fats, trans fats, alcohol and caffeine, as they can
increase oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain and
interfere with neurotransmitter function.
• Głąbska D, Guzek D, Groele B, Gutkowska K. Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Mental Health in Adults: A
Systematic Review. Nutrients. 2020 Jan 1;12(1):115. doi: 10.3390/nu12010115. PMID: 31906271; PMCID:
PMC7019743.
• Diet and depression - Harvard Health
OMEGA 3 FATTY ACID
Omega-3 fatty acids are also involved in the synthesis and signaling of
neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, which are
important for mood regulation, cognition and behavior.
Some studies have suggested that omega-3 fatty acids may have beneficial effects
on depression and other mood disorders. The possible mechanisms of action
include:
• Increasing the fluidity and permeability of neuronal membranes, which may
enhance the transmission and reception of neurotransmitters.
• Reducing the production and activity of proinflammatory cytokines, such as
interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha
(TNF-α), which may induce depressive symptoms by affecting the serotonin and
dopamine systems.
• Modulating the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which
may reduce the secretion of cortisol and improve the negative feedback regulation
of stress hormones.
• Increasing the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which may
promote neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival in the
https://naturalpath.net/natural-news/omega-3-fatty-acids-and-depression/
• Flaxseeds and flaxseed oil, which contain
ALA, a type of omega-3 fatty acid that can
be converted into EPA and DHA in the
body, but at a low efficiency.
• Chia seeds, which are another source of
ALA and provide fiber, protein and
minerals.
• Walnuts and walnut oil, which are rich in
ALA and contain other healthy fats,
antioxidants and phytochemicals.
• Soybeans and soybean oil, which contain
ALA and also provide protein, fiber and
isoflavones.
• Canola oil, which is a common cooking oil
that contains ALA and also has a high
smoke point
VITAMIN B AND DEPRESSION
• . Some of them are also involved in the
production and regulation of
neurotransmitters, such as serotonin,
dopamine and norepinephrine, which affect
mood, cognition and behavior.
• Some studies have suggested that vitamin B
deficiency may be associated with depression,
as low levels of vitamin B can impair the
function of the neurotransmitter systems and
increase the risk of oxidative stress and
inflammation in the brain. However, the
evidence is not conclusive, and more research
is needed to establish a causal link between
vitamin B and depression.
• Dairy products, such as milk, cheese and
yogurt, which are good sources of vitamin B2
(riboflavin), B5 (pantothenic acid) and B12
• Whole grains, such as oats, barley and brown
Mikkelsen K, Stojanovska L, Apostolopoulos V. The Effects of Vitamin B in Depression. Curr Med Chem. 2016;23(38):4317-4337. doi: 10.2174/0929867323666160920110810.
PMID: 27655070.
ANTIOXIDANTS AND DEPRESSION
• One of the biological factors that may contribute to depression and
anxiety is the imbalance between the antioxidant defense system and
the oxidative stress pathway in the brain.
• Several studies have shown that patients with depression and anxiety
have lower levels of antioxidants and higher levels of oxidative stress
markers in their blood, cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue compared to
healthy controls.
• Moreover, oxidative stress can affect the neurotransmission of serotonin,
dopamine, glutamate and GABA, which are involved in the regulation of
mood, cognition and behavior.
• Therefore, antioxidants may play a role in the prevention and treatment
of depression and anxiety by scavenging ROS and RNS, restoring the
redox balance, protecting the neuronal integrity and function, modulating
the neurotransmitter systems and reducing the inflammation in the brain.
• Xu Y, Wang C, Klabnik JJ, O'Donnell JM. Novel therapeutic targets in depression and anxiety: antioxidants as a candidate treatment. Curr Neuropharmacol. 2014 Mar;12(2):108-19. doi:
10.2174/1570159X11666131120231448. PMID: 24669206; PMCID: PMC3964743.
• Gautam M, Agrawal M, Gautam M, Sharma P, Gautam AS, Gautam S. Role of antioxidants in generalised anxiety disorder and depression. Indian J Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;54(3):244-7. doi:
10.4103/0019-5545.102424. PMID: 23226848; PMCID: PMC3512361.
Some foods that are rich in antioxidants
and may help with depression are:
• Berries, such as blueberries,
strawberries, raspberries and
cranberries, which contain flavonoids,
a type of polyphenol with anti-
inflammatory and neuroprotective
effects
• Dark chocolate, especially with high
cocoa content, which contains phenolic
compounds, such as catechins and
procyanidins, that can modulate the
serotonin and dopamine systems and
reduce oxidative stress
• Green tea, which contains catechins, a
type of flavonoid with antioxidant and
anti-cancer effects, as well as theanine,
an amino acid that can enhance mood
and cognitive function
• Tomatoes, which are a good source of
lycopene, a carotenoid that can protect
against prostate cancer and
cardiovascular disease, as well as
improve mood and reduce inflammation
• Citrus fruits, such as lemons, limes,
oranges and grapefruits, which are rich in
vitamin C (ascorbic acid), a water-soluble
antioxidant that can scavenge free
radicals and regenerate other
antioxidants
• Spinach and other leafy green
vegetables, which are high in vitamin C
and carotenoids, such as beta-carotene
and lutein, that can protect the eyes and
the brain from oxidative damage
• Broccoli and other cruciferous
vegetables, such as cauliflower, Brussels
sprouts and bok choy
Gautam M, Agrawal M, Gautam M, Sharma P, Gautam AS, Gautam S. Role of antioxidants in generalised anxiety disorder and depression. Indian J Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;54(3):244-7. doi:
10.4103/0019-5545.102424. PMID: 23226848; PMCID: PMC3512361.
TRYPTOPHAN AND DEPRESSION
Tryptophan metabolism may play a significant role in the pathophysiology and
treatment of depression.
Modulating tryptophan metabolism with pharmacological or nutritional
interventions may have potential benefits for improving mood and cognitive function
in depressed patients.
Shift in tryptophan metabolism may have several consequences for the brain, such
as:
• Reduced serotonin levels may impair mood regulation, cognitive function, sleep
quality and circadian rhythm.
• Increased levels of 3-HK and QUIN may cause oxidative stress, excitotoxicity,
neuroinflammation and apoptosis of neurons and glial cells.
• Reduced levels of KYNA may decrease its neuroprotective effects against glutamate
toxicity and inflammation.
• Altered levels of PIC may affect its role in metal ion homeostasis and immune
modulation.
Correia AS, Vale N. Tryptophan Metabolism in Depression: A Narrative Review with a Focus on Serotonin and Kynurenine Pathways. Int J Mol Sci. 2022
Jul 31;23(15):8493. doi: 10.3390/ijms23158493. PMID: 35955633; PMCID: PMC9369076.
9 Foods High in Tryptophan and Why You Need It (webmd.com)
PREBIOTICS & PROBIOTICS – DEPRESSION
• Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients that stimulate the growth and
activity of beneficial bacteria in the gut. Probiotics are live microorganisms that
confer health benefits to the host when administered in adequate amounts. Both
prebiotics and probiotics can modulate the brain-gut-microbiome axis, which is a
bidirectional communication pathway between the gut microbiota and the
central nervous system.
• Some of the possible mechanisms of prebiotics and probiotics in depression are:
• They can attenuate inflammation by downregulating proinflammatory cytokines,
regulating indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity and restoring gut
permeability.
• They can promote the synthesis of neurotransmitters such as serotonin,
dopamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) either directly or indirectly by
increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and/or decreasing
monoamine oxidase (MAO) levels.
• They can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by reducing
cortisol levels and enhancing negative feedback mechanisms
• Chudzik A, Orzyłowska A, Rola R, Stanisz GJ. Probiotics, Prebiotics and Postbiotics on Mitigation of Depression Symptoms: Modulation of the Brain-Gut-Microbiome Axis. Biomolecules. 2021 Jul 7;11(7):1000. doi:
10.3390/biom11071000. PMID: 34356624; PMCID: PMC8301955.
• Johnson D, Thurairajasingam S, Letchumanan V, Chan KG, Lee LH. Exploring the Role and Potential of Probiotics in the Field of Mental Health: Major Depressive Disorder. Nutrients. 2021 May 20;13(5):1728. doi:
10.3390/nu13051728. PMID: 34065187; PMCID: PMC8161395.
• https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/probiotics/faq-20058065
• https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/probiotics-and-prebiotics
GUT DYSBIOSIS AND ANXIETY
Gut dysbiosis, characterized by an imbalance in the gut
microbiota, has been associated with anxiety and
anxiety-related disorders. While the exact mechanisms
are still being investigated, several factors may
contribute to the relationship between gut dysbiosis
and anxiety:
• Communication via the Gut-Brain Axis
• Neurotransmitter Production
• Inflammation and Immune Activation
• Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis
Dysregulation
• Short-Chain Fatty Acids (SCFAs): The gut microbiota
produces SCFAs through the fermentation of dietary
fiber. SCFAs, such as butyrate, have been implicated in
anxiety regulation and have anti-inflammatory effects.
Dysbiosis can affect SCFA production, potentially
impacting anxiety levels.
ANXIETY AND NUTRITION
Nutrition plays a significant role in supporting mental
health, including anxiety management. While proper
nutrition alone cannot cure anxiety disorders, adopting
a balanced and nutrient-rich diet can contribute to
overall well-being and potentially alleviate anxiety
symptoms.
Here are some ways in which nutrition can be relevant
to anxiety:
1.Balanced Diet
2.Omega 3 fatty acid
3.Complex Carbohydrates
4.Magnesium
5.Vitamin B
6.Hydration
Aucoin M, LaChance L, Naidoo U, Remy D, Shekdar T, Sayar N, Cardozo V, Rawana T,
Chan I, Cooley K. Diet and Anxiety: A Scoping Review. Nutrients. 2021 Dec
10;13(12):4418. doi: 10.3390/nu13124418. PMID: 34959972; PMCID: PMC8706568.
BALANCED DIET AND
ANXIETY
A balanced diet may help you cope with anxiety
by providing your body and brain with essential
nutrients and avoiding foods that may worsen
your mood. Some of the dietary strategies that
may ease anxiety are:
• Eating a breakfast that includes
some protein, such as eggs, yogurt, nuts, or
cheese. Protein can help you feel fuller longer
and keep your blood sugar stable.
• Eating complex carbohydrates, such as whole
grains, fruits, and vegetables. Complex
carbohydrates are thought to increase the
amount of serotonin in your brain, which has
a calming effect. Avoid simple carbohydrates,
such as sugary foods and drinks, which can
cause blood sugar spikes and crashes.
• Drinking plenty of water to stay hydrated.
Even mild dehydration can affect your mood
and energy levels.
• Eating foods rich in magnesium, such
as leafy greens, legumes, nuts, seeds,
and whole grains. Magnesium may help
reduce anxiety by relaxing your muscles
and nerves.
• Eating foods rich in folate, such as
asparagus, broccoli, spinach, avocado,
beans, and lentils. Folate is a B vitamin
that helps your body produce
neurotransmitters like serotonin and
dopamine.
• Nutritional strategies to ease anxiety - Harvard Health
• Coping with anxiety: Can diet make a difference? - Mayo Clinic
• Eating well to help manage anxiety: Your questions answered - Harvard
Health
OMEGA 3 FATTY ACID AND ANXIETY
Omega-3 fatty acids may have a beneficial effect on anxiety by influencing various
biological processes in your body and brain. Some of the possible mechanisms are:
• Reducing inflammation – Chronic inflammation can contribute to anxiety by affecting
your immune system, neurotransmitters, and hormones. Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-
inflammatory properties and may help lower the levels of inflammatory markers, such as
C-reactive protein (CRP) and cytokines.
• Increasing brain – derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF is a protein that helps your
brain cells grow, survive, and communicate. Low levels of BDNF have been linked to
anxiety and depression. Omega-3 fatty acids may help increase BDNF levels and protect
your brain from stress and damage.
• Lowering cortisol – Cortisol is a hormone that is released in response to stress. High
levels of cortisol can cause anxiety, insomnia, and mood swings. Omega-3 fatty acids may
help regulate cortisol production and reduce its negative effects on your mental health
Polokowski AR, Shakil H, Carmichael CL, Reigada LC. Omega-3 fatty acids and anxiety: A systematic review of the
possible mechanisms at play. Nutr Neurosci. 2020 Jul;23(7):494-504. doi: 10.1080/1028415X.2018.1525092. Epub
2018 Sep 28. PMID: 30264663.
• The best sources of omega-3 fatty acids for
anxiety are those that provide high amounts of
EPA and DHA, which are the types of omega-3s
that have the most evidence for reducing anxiety
symptoms. According to the web search results,
some of the best sources of EPA and DHA are:
• Fatty fish, such as mackerel, salmon, herring,
sardines, and oysters. These fish provide
between 0.3 and 4.6 grams of EPA and DHA per
3-ounce (oz) serving.
• Algae oil supplements, which are a vegan alternative
to fish oil. Algae are a direct source of EPA and DHA
and can provide similar benefits as fish oil.
• Some plant sources of omega-3s, such as flaxseed oil,
canola oil, chia seeds, and walnuts, provide ALA, which
is a precursor of EPA and DHA. However, the
conversion rate of ALA to EPA and DHA is very low in
humans, so these sources may not be as effective as
fish or algae oil for anxiety.
Su KP, Matsuoka Y, Pae CU. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids
in Prevention of Mood and Anxiety Disorders. Clin Psychopharmacol
Neurosci. 2015 Aug 31;13(2):129-37. doi:
10.9758/cpn.2015.13.2.129. PMID: 26243838; PMCID:
PMC4540034.
CARBOHYDRATE AND ANXIETY
Some studies suggest that carbohydrates can help reduce anxiety by
increasing the production of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that
regulates mood, sleep and appetite.
Serotonin is made from tryptophan, an amino acid that is more
available to the brain when carbohydrates are present.
• Carbohydrates may also help stabilize blood glucose levels, which
can prevent mood swings and irritability caused by hypoglycemia
(low blood sugar).
• Moreover, the timing of carbohydrate intake may also play a role in
anxiety. Some sources suggest that eating carbohydrates in the
evening or before bed may help promote relaxation and sleep
quality by increasing serotonin and melatonin levels.
• The quality and quantity of
carbohydrates may be important for
managing anxiety. Some sources
recommend choosing complex
carbohydrates that are high in fiber and low
in sugar, such as whole grains, fruits,
vegetables, beans and nuts.
• These foods can provide a steady source of
energy and nutrients for the brain and gut,
as well as support a healthy microbiome
that influences mental health.
• On the other hand, simple carbohydrates
that are refined and processed, such as
sweets, pastries, white bread and sugary
drinks, should be limited or avoided as they
can cause rapid fluctuations in blood
glucose and serotonin levels.
• Aucoin M, LaChance L, Naidoo U, Remy D, Shekdar T, Sayar N, Cardozo V, Rawana T,
Chan I, Cooley K. Diet and Anxiety: A Scoping Review. Nutrients. 2021 Dec
10;13(12):4418. doi: 10.3390/nu13124418. PMID: 34959972; PMCID: PMC8706568.
• Santos CJ, Ferreira AVM, Oliveira AL, Oliveira MC, Gomes JS, Aguiar DC.
Carbohydrate-enriched diet predispose to anxiety and depression-like
behavior after stress in mice. Nutr Neurosci. 2018 Jan;21(1):33-39. doi:
10.1080/1028415X.2016.1213529. Epub 2016 Jul 29. PMID: 27472404.
MAGNESIUM AND ANXIETY
• Some studies suggest that magnesium may help reduce anxiety by
regulating neurotransmitters, which are chemical messengers that relay
signals between nerve cells in the brain and body. Magnesium may also
affect the hypothalamus, a part of the brain that controls the pituitary and
adrenal glands, which are involved in the stress response. Magnesium may
also modulate the activity of the HPA axis, a system that regulates the
body’s reaction to stress and anxiety.
• However, other studies indicate that magnesium deficiency may worsen
anxiety by impairing brain function and increasing inflammation and
oxidative stress. These factors can damage brain cells and contribute to
anxiety and depression. Additionally, some people may experience
symptoms of anxiety when they have low levels of magnesium, such as
irritability, nervousness, insomnia and muscle spasms
• Lakhan SE, Vieira KF. Nutritional and herbal supplements for anxiety and anxiety-related disorders: systematic review. Nutr J. 2010 Oct 7;9:42. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-9-42. PMID: 20929532;
PMCID: PMC2959081.
• Boyle NB, et. al. (2017). The effects of magnesium supplementation on subjective anxiety and stress – A systematic review. DOI: 10.3390/nu9050429
VITAMIN B AND ANXIETY
Some studies suggest that vitamin B
may help reduce anxiety by
regulating neurotransmitters, such as
serotonin, dopamine and
norepinephrine, which are involved in
mood, motivation and stress
response.
Vitamin B may also modulate the
activity of the HPA axis, a system that
regulates the body’s reaction to stress
and anxiety.
Some foods that are rich in vitamin B
include dairy, nuts, seeds, beans, whole
grains and leafy greens.
Field, D. T., Cracknell, R. O., Eastwood, J. R., Scarfe, P., Williams, C.
M., Zheng, Y., & Tavassoli, T. (2022). High-dose Vitamin B6
supplementation reduces anxiety and strengthens visual surround
suppression. Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and
Experimental, 37(6), e2852. https://doi.org/10.1002/hup.2852
GUT DYSBIOSIS AUTISM
SPECTRUM DISORDER
ASD is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder
characterized by social communication challenges,
repetitive behaviors, and restricted interests.
• Gut Microbiota Composition: Studies have found
differences in the gut microbiota composition of
individuals with ASD compared to typically
developing individuals. These differences include
alterations in the diversity and abundance of specific
bacterial species.
• Gastrointestinal Symptoms: Many individuals with
ASD also experience gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms,
such as constipation, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and
bloating. It has been suggested that gut dysbiosis
may contribute to the development of these GI
symptoms in individuals with ASD.
Gut-Brain Axis: The gut microbiota communicates bidirectionally
with the brain through the gut-brain axis, involving neural,
hormonal, and immunological pathways. Imbalances in the gut
microbiota can potentially impact brain function and behaviors,
including those associated with ASD.
Metabolites and Inflammation: Dysbiosis can result in alterations in
microbial metabolites produced in the gut, such as short-chain fatty
acids (SCFAs) and neurotransmitter-like molecules. These
metabolites can influence neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and
neurotransmitter systems, which may play a role in the development
and progression of ASD.
Fattorusso, A., Di Genova, L., Dell'Isola, G. B., Mencaroni, E., & Esposito, S. (2019). Autism Spectrum
Disorders and the Gut Microbiota. Nutrients, 11(3), 521. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030521
ASD AND NUTRITION
Nutrition plays an important role in supporting the overall health
and well-being of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).
While nutrition alone cannot cure or treat ASD, a balanced diet can
help provide essential nutrients, support optimal brain function,
address specific nutritional needs, and potentially improve certain
symptoms associated with ASD
• fiber-rich foods like whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables
• prebiotics, and probiotics
• Fruits and Vegetables such as berries, leafy greens, bell peppers,
carrots, and sweet potatoes.
• Whole grain options such as whole wheat bread, brown rice,
quinoa, oats, and whole grain pasta.
• healthy fats, such as avocados, nuts (e.g., almonds, walnuts),
seeds (e.g., chia seeds, flaxseeds), and olive oil.
• Omega-3 Rich Foods: Include fatty fish (such as salmon, mackerel,
and sardines), walnuts, flaxseeds, and chia seeds to provide
omega-3 fatty acids
Doreswamy, S., Bashir, A., Guarecuco,
J. E., Lahori, S., Baig, A., Narra, L. R.,
Patel, P., & Heindl, S. E. (2020). Effects
of Diet, Nutrition, and Exercise in
Children With Autism and Autism
Spectrum Disorder: A Literature
Review. Cureus, 12(12), e12222.
https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.12222
GUT DYSBIOSIS AND SCHIZOPHRENIA
A chronic mental disorder characterized by distorted
thinking, delusions, hallucinations, and impaired
social functioning. While the exact mechanisms are
still being investigated, some theories are as follow :
Altered Gut Microbiota Composition
Studies have found differences in the gut microbiota
composition of individuals with schizophrenia
compared to healthy individuals. These differences
include changes in the diversity and abundance of
specific bacterial species.
Immune Dysregulation and Inflammation
Gut dysbiosis can trigger immune dysregulation and
low-grade inflammation, which may contribute to
the development and progression of schizophrenia.
Inflammatory markers have been found to be
elevated in individuals with schizophrenia.
Neurotransmitter Alterations
The gut microbiota can influence the production and metabolism of
neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and serotonin, which are known to be
involved in schizophrenia. Imbalances in the gut microbiota can potentially affect
neurotransmitter levels and signaling pathways in the brain.
Gut-Brain Axis Dysfunction
The gut microbiota communicates bidirectionally with the brain through the gut-
brain axis. Disruptions in the gut microbiota can potentially lead to alterations in
the signaling between the gut and the brain, impacting brain function and
behaviors associated with schizophrenia.
Antipsychotic Medication Effects
It's important to note that antipsychotic medications commonly used to treat
schizophrenia can themselves impact the gut microbiota composition. This adds
complexity to the relationship between gut dysbiosis and schizophrenia, as
medication effects need to be considered
Munawar, N., Ahsan, K., Muhammad, K., Ahmad, A., Anwar, M. A., Shah, I., Al Ameri, A. K., & Al Mughairbi, F. (2021). Hidden Role of Gut Microbiome Dysbiosis in
Schizophrenia: Antipsychotics or Psychobiotics as Therapeutics?. International journal of molecular sciences, 22(14), 7671. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22147671
When it comes to schizophrenia, it is important to focus on a
balanced and nutritious diet that supports overall health and well-
being. While specific food items may not directly treat or cure
schizophrenia, a healthy diet can contribute to overall physical and
mental well-being.
• Fruits and Vegetables such as berries, leafy greens, bell peppers,
carrots, and broccoli.
• Whole grain options such as whole wheat bread, brown rice,
quinoa, oats, and whole grain pasta.
• Healthy fats, such as avocados, nuts (e.g., almonds, walnuts),
seeds (e.g., chia seeds, flaxseeds), and olive oil
• Omega-3 fatty acids, such as fatty fish (e.g., salmon, mackerel,
sardines), walnuts, flaxseeds, and chia seeds.
• Antioxidants, such as berries, dark chocolate, green tea, and
colorful vegetables
• Hydration
Amani, R. (2007). Is dietary pattern of schizophrenia
patients different from healthy subjects?. BMC
Psychiatry. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-7-15.
SCHIZOPHRENIA AND NUTRITION
EMOTIONAL
HEALING
Emotional healing refers to the process of
addressing and resolving emotional
wounds, trauma, and negative experiences
in order to promote healing, growth, and
well-being. It involves understanding,
processing, and integrating emotions in a
healthy and constructive way.
EMOTIONS AND HORMONES
Several hormones play a role in regulating and
influencing emotions. The mechanism of hormones
and emotions is a complex and intricate process
involving multiple systems within the body.
• Hormone Production: Hormones are chemical
messengers produced by various glands and tissues
in the body. They are released into the bloodstream
and travel to target cells or organs, where they exert
their effects.
• Receptor Activation: Hormones bind to specific
receptors on target cells, initiating a series of
biochemical reactions within the cell. These
reactions can impact gene expression, protein
synthesis, and cellular signaling pathways.
• Neurotransmitter Regulation: Hormones
can influence the production, release, and activity
of neurotransmitters in the brain.
Neurotransmitters are chemicals involved in
communication between brain cells and play a
crucial role in regulating mood, emotions, and
behavior.
• Brain-Body Communication: The brain and the
body have a bidirectional communication network.
Hormones can communicate with the brain
through various pathways, including the
hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the
hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The
brain can also send signals to the body, triggering
the release of hormones in response to emotional
experiences and stress.
BRACELAND F. J. (1953). Hormones and
their influence on the emotions. Bulletin
of the New York Academy of
Medicine, 29(10), 765–777.
• Emotional Regulation: Hormones can influence emotional regulation and
mood through their interactions with specific brain regions and circuits. For
example, serotonin, dopamine, and oxytocin are neurotransmitters that
play a role in regulating mood and emotions, and their levels and activity
are influenced by hormonal signals.
•Stress Response: Hormones, particularly cortisol and
adrenaline, are involved in the body's response to stress. In
situations perceived as threatening, these hormones are
released, activating the body's "fight-or-flight" response.
Chronic or excessive stress can dysregulate the stress response
system and contribute to emotional disturbances.​
•Feedback Mechanisms: Hormone levels are tightly
regulated through feedback mechanisms. For instance, when
hormone levels reach a certain threshold, feedback signals from
target cells or the brain can inhibit further hormone production
or release.​
HORMONES
AND
NUTRITION
• Serotonin
• Dopamine
• Cortisol
• Adrenaline (Epinephrine)
• Estrogen
• Testosterone
SEROTONIN AND NUTRITION
Serotonin itself cannot be obtained directly from food because
it is a neurotransmitter produced within the body. However,
there are certain foods that can indirectly support serotonin
production or provide the building blocks necessary for its
synthesis.
• Tryptophan-Rich Foods: Tryptophan is an essential amino
acid that serves as a precursor for serotonin synthesis. Foods
rich in tryptophan include:
• Dairy products (milk, cheese, yogurt)
• Nuts and seeds (almonds, walnuts, sunflower seeds)
• Legumes (lentils, chickpeas, soybeans)
• Complex Carbohydrates: opt for complex carbohydrates that
provide sustained energy, such as:
• Whole grains (oats, brown rice, quinoa)
• Fruits (bananas, apples, berries)
• Vegetables (sweet potatoes, leafy greens)
• Omega-3 Fatty Acid-Rich Foods: Omega-
3 fatty acids have been associated with
increased serotonin levels.
• Flaxseeds
• Chia seeds
• Walnuts
• B Vitamin-Rich Foods: Certain B
vitamins, such as vitamin B6, are
involved in serotonin synthesis.
• Bananas
• Nuts and seeds
• Whole grains
• Fermented Foods: The gut
microbiota has been linked to
serotonin production and
regulation. Consuming fermented
foods can support a healthy gut
microbiota.
• Yogurt (preferably plain and
unsweetened)
• Kefir
• Sauerkraut
• Kimchi
• Mohajeri MH, Wittwer J, Vargas K, Hogan E, Holmes A, Rogers PJ, Goralczyk R, Gibson EL. Chronic treatment with a tryptophan-rich protein
hydrolysate improves emotional processing, mental energy levels and reaction time in middle-aged women. Br J Nutr. 2015 Jan 28;113(2):350-
65. doi: 10.1017/S0007114514003754. Epub 2015 Jan 9. PMID: 25572038.
• Jenkins, T. A., Nguyen, J. C., Polglaze, K. E., & Bertrand, P. P. (2016). Influence of Tryptophan and Serotonin on Mood and Cognition with a
Possible Role of the Gut-Brain Axis. Nutrients, 8(1), 56. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu8010056
DOPAMINE AND NUTRITION
Dopamine is a neurotransmitter associated with pleasure,
motivation, and reward. While there are no specific foods that
directly increase dopamine levels, certain nutrients and dietary
factors can support healthy dopamine function.
• Protein-Rich Foods: Consuming foods that are high in protein
provides the building blocks for dopamine production.
• Eggs
• Dairy products (milk, cheese, yogurt)
• Legumes (lentils, chickpeas, beans)
• Tyrosine-Rich Foods: Tyrosine is an amino acid that is
involved in dopamine synthesis.
• Almonds
• Avocados
• Bananas
• Pumpkin seeds
• Sesame seeds
• L-DOPA-Rich Foods: L-DOPA is a precursor
to dopamine. Include foods that contain L-
DOPA or its precursor, such as:
• Mucuna pruriens (a tropical legume
also known as velvet bean)
• Fava beans
• Green Leafy Vegetables: Green leafy
vegetables are rich in folate and other
nutrients that support healthy dopamine
function. Include vegetables such as:
• Spinach
• Kale
• Broccoli
• Cilia R, Laguna J, Cassani E, Cereda E, Pozzi NG, Isaias IU, Contin M, Barichella M, Pezzoli
G. Mucuna pruriens in Parkinson disease: A double-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover
study. Neurology. 2017 Aug 1;89(5):432-438. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000004175. Epub
2017 Jul 5. PMID: 28679598; PMCID: PMC5539737.
• Mehran S M, M., & B, G. (2013). Simultaneous determination of levodopa and carbidopa from fava
bean, green peas and green beans by high performance liquid gas chromatography. Journal of clinical
and diagnostic research : JCDR, 7(6), 1004–1007. https://doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2013/5415.3072
• Antioxidant-Rich Foods: Antioxidants protect the
brain from oxidative stress, which can affect
dopamine function.
• Dark chocolate
• Green tea
• Berries (blueberries, strawberries, raspberries)
• Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty acids can
support brain health and neurotransmitter function.
• Walnuts
• Flaxseeds
• Chia seeds
This Photo by Unknown author is licensed under CC BY-NC.
• Kühn S, Düzel S, Colzato L, Norman K, Gallinat J, Brandmaier AM, Lindenberger U,
Widaman KF. Food for thought: association between dietary tyrosine and cognitive
performance in younger and older adults. Psychol Res. 2019 Sep;83(6):1097-1106. doi:
10.1007/s00426-017-0957-4. Epub 2017 Dec 18. PMID: 29255945; PMCID:
PMC6647184.
• Geiger BM, Haburcak M, Avena NM, Moyer MC, Hoebel BG, Pothos EN. Deficits of mesolimbic
dopamine neurotransmission in rat dietary obesity. Neuroscience. 2009 Apr 10;159(4):1193-9.
doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2009.02.007. Epub 2009 Feb 11. PMID: 19409204; PMCID:
PMC2677693.
• González-Arancibia C, Urrutia-Piñones J, Illanes-González J, Martinez-Pinto J, Sotomayor-Zárate
R, Julio-Pieper M, Bravo JA. Do your gut microbes affect your brain dopamine?
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2019 May;236(5):1611-1622. doi: 10.1007/s00213-019-05265-5.
Epub 2019 May 17. PMID: 31098656.
CORTISOL AND NUTRITION
Cortisol is a stress hormone produced by the
adrenal glands. It is involved in the body's
response to stress and helps regulate blood
pressure, blood sugar levels, and immune
responses.
Chronically high levels of cortisol due to
chronic stress can contribute to anxiety and
mood disorders.
While it's generally not advisable to
intentionally increase cortisol levels, as
chronically elevated cortisol levels can be
detrimental to health, there are certain
dietary practices that can help support
healthy cortisol regulation.
Balanced Macronutrient Intake: Ensure that you're consuming a balanced
diet that includes an appropriate ratio of macronutrients—carbohydrates,
proteins, and fats. Avoid extreme low-carbohydrate diets, as they may lead
to increased cortisol production.
Adequate Caloric Intake: Caloric restriction and severe energy deficits can
elevate cortisol levels. Ensure you're consuming enough calories to meet
your body's energy needs.
Whole Foods and Balanced Meals: Focus on consuming whole, nutrient-
dense foods. Include a variety of fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, whole
grains, and healthy fats in your meals.
•Hirotsu C, Tufik S, Andersen ML. Interactions between sleep, stress, and metabolism: From physiological to pathological conditions. Sleep Sci. 2015 Nov;8(3):143-52. doi: 10.1016/j.slsci.2015.09.002. Epub 2015 Sep
28. PMID: 26779321; PMCID: PMC4688585.​
•Chen C, Nakagawa S, An Y, Ito K, Kitaichi Y, Kusumi I. The exercise-glucocorticoid paradox: How exercise is beneficial to cognition, mood, and the brain while increasing glucocorticoid levels. Front Neuroendocrinol. 2017
Jan;44:83-102. doi: 10.1016/j.yfrne.2016.12.001. Epub 2016 Dec 9. PMID: 27956050.​
•Hofmann, S. G., & Gómez, A. F. (2017). Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Anxiety and Depression. The Psychiatric clinics of North America, 40(4), 739–749. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2017.08.008
•Iranmanesh A, Lawson D, Dunn B, Veldhuis JD. Glucose ingestion selectively amplifies ACTH and cortisol secretory-burst mass and enhances their joint synchrony in healthy men. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011
Sep;96(9):2882-8. doi: 10.1210/jc.2011-0682. Epub 2011 Jul 13. PMID: 21752898; PMCID: PMC3167666.​
•Gyllenhammer LE, Weigensberg MJ, Spruijt-Metz D, Allayee H, Goran MI, Davis JN. Modifying influence of dietary sugar in the relationship between cortisol and visceral adipose tissue in minority youth. Obesity (Silver
Spring). 2014 Feb;22(2):474-81. doi: 10.1002/oby.20594. Epub 2013 Sep 20. PMID: 23929660; PMCID: PMC3946447.​
Regular Meal Times: Maintain regular meal times and avoid prolonged periods of fasting or
skipping meals. Erratic eating patterns and extreme fasting can increase cortisol production.
Moderate Caffeine Intake: Caffeine can temporarily increase cortisol levels. Limit your intake of
caffeinated beverages like coffee, tea, and energy drinks. Be aware of how caffeine affects your
individual response and consider reducing or avoiding it if you're particularly sensitive.
Adequate Hydration: Dehydration can contribute to increased cortisol
levels. Ensure you're drinking enough water throughout the day to stay properly hydrated.
ADRENALINE AND NUTRITION
The adrenal hormones help regulate several
bodily functions including metabolism, blood
pressure and your body's response to stress.
When it comes to supporting adrenal health, it's
important to focus on a well-balanced diet that
provides essential nutrients and supports overall
well-being
• Nutrient-Dense Foods: Consume a variety of
whole, nutrient-dense foods that provide
essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.
This includes fresh fruits, vegetables, lean
proteins, whole grains, nuts, and seeds.
• Vitamin C-Rich Foods: Vitamin C is important for
adrenal function and can help support the
production of adrenal hormones. Include foods
such as citrus fruits, berries, kiwi, bell peppers,
broccoli, and leafy greens.
• B Vitamin-Rich Foods: B vitamins,
including B5 (pantothenic acid) and
B6 (pyridoxine), are essential for
adrenal health. Good dietary sources
of B vitamins include whole grains,
legumes, nuts, seeds, poultry, fish,
and leafy green vegetables.
• Magnesium-Rich Foods: Magnesium
plays a role in stress response and
adrenal function. Include
magnesium-rich foods such as leafy
greens, nuts, seeds, legumes, and
whole grains.
• Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty acids
have anti-inflammatory properties and can
support overall health. Include foods rich
in omega-3s, such as fatty fish (salmon,
mackerel, sardines), walnuts, flaxseeds,
and chia seeds.
• Healthy Fats: Include sources of healthy
fats in your diet, such as avocados, olive
oil, coconut oil, and nuts. These fats
provide sustained energy and support
hormone production.
https://www.healthline.com/health/adrenal-
fatigue-diet#foods-to-eat
ESTROGEN AND NUTRITION
Estrogen has been associated with positive mood
and emotional well-being, while fluctuations in
estrogen levels during the menstrual cycle or
hormonal changes can contribute to
premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or mood swings.
Mood swings are another effect of low estrogen.
One may feel sad, anxious, or frustrated. Shifting
hormone levels and night sweats may disrupt
your sleep. This can cause fatigue, which may
make mood swings worse.
While estrogen levels are primarily regulated by
the body's hormonal system, certain foods
contain phytoestrogens, which are plant
compounds that can mimic or interact with
estrogen in the body.
•Soy Products: Soybeans and soy
products, such as tofu, tempeh, and
edamame, are rich in
phytoestrogens called isoflavones.
• Flaxseeds: Flaxseeds are a good
source of lignans, which are
phytoestrogens. Ground flaxseeds
are easier to digest and provide
better absorption of lignans.
• Sesame Seeds: Sesame seeds and
sesame products, such as tahini,
contain lignans that have weak
estrogenic activity.
• https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/dietary-factors/phytochemicals/soy-isoflavones#food-sources
• De Silva, S. F., & Alcorn, J. (2019). Flaxseed Lignans as Important Dietary Polyphenols for Cancer Prevention and Treatment: Chemistry,
Pharmacokinetics, and Molecular Targets. Pharmaceuticals (Basel, Switzerland), 12(2), 68. https://doi.org/10.3390/ph12020068
• Wu WH, Kang YP, Wang NH, Jou HJ, Wang TA. Sesame ingestion affects sex hormones, antioxidant status, and blood lipids in postmenopausal women. J Nutr.
2006 May;136(5):1270-5. doi: 10.1093/jn/136.5.1270. PMID: 16614415.
• Legumes: Certain legumes,
including chickpeas, lentils, and red
clover, contain phytoestrogens like
isoflavones and coumestans.
• Whole Grains: Whole grains like oats,
barley, and wheat germ contain
lignans that have mild estrogenic
properties.
• Fruits and Vegetables: Some fruits
and vegetables, such as apples,
cherries, carrots, and yams, contain
compounds with weak estrogenic
effects.
• Rodríguez-García, C., Sánchez-Quesada, C., Toledo, E., Delgado-Rodríguez, M., & Gaforio, J. J.
(2019). Naturally Lignan-Rich Foods: A Dietary Tool for Health Promotion?. Molecules (Basel,
Switzerland), 24(5), 917. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24050917
• Yang J, Wu Q, Chen H, Zhuang Y. Influence of micronization on improving phytoestrogenic effects of wheat bran. J
Am Coll Nutr. 2015;34(3):224-7. doi: 10.1080/07315724.2014.912166. Epub 2015 Mar 11. PMID: 25757396.
TESTOSTERONE AND NUTRITION
Testosterone is primarily produced by the
testes in males and to a lesser extent by the
ovaries and adrenal glands in females.
While specific foods may not directly
increase testosterone levels, maintaining a
healthy and balanced diet is important for
overall hormonal balance and well-being.
• healthy fats, such as avocados, nuts (like
almonds and walnuts), seeds (like
flaxseeds and chia seeds), fatty fish (like
salmon and mackerel), and olive oil.
• Zinc-Rich Foods: Zinc is essential
for testosterone production.
Include foods like oysters, lean
meats (beef, poultry), shellfish,
legumes (chickpeas, lentils), nuts,
and seeds (pumpkin seeds,
sesame seeds) that are rich in
zinc.
• Vitamin D: Adequate vitamin D
levels are associated with healthy
testosterone levels. Get regular
sun exposure or consider
incorporating vitamin D-rich
foods into your diet, such as fatty
fish, fortified dairy products, and
egg yolks. If needed, consult a
healthcare professional for
vitamin D supplementation.
• Protein-Rich Foods: Consuming
adequate protein is important for
overall hormone production. Include
lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy
products, legumes, and plant-based
protein sources like tofu and tempeh.
• Cruciferous Vegetables: Cruciferous
vegetables, such as broccoli,
cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, and
cabbage, contain a compound called
indole-3-carbinol, which may help
support healthy testosterone
metabolism.
• Tremellen K, McPhee N, Pearce K, Benson S, Schedlowski M, Engler H. Endotoxin-initiated inflammation reduces testosterone production in men of
reproductive age. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2018 Mar 1;314(3):E206-E213. doi: 10.1152/ajpendo.00279.2017. Epub 2017 Nov 28. PMID:
29183872; PMCID: PMC5899218.
• Pizzorno L. (2015). Nothing Boring About Boron. Integrative medicine (Encinitas, Calif.), 14(4), 35–48.
• Ammar, A., MounaTurki, Trabelsi, K., Bragazzi, N. L., Boukhris, O., Bouaziz, M., Ayadi, F., El Abed, K., Driss, T., Souissi, N., Chtourou, H., Bailey, S. J., & Hoekelmann, A.
(2020). Effects of natural polyphenol-rich pomegranate juice on the acute and delayed response of Homocysteine and steroidal hormones following weightlifting
exercises: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 17(1), 15. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-020-00345-w
SPIRITUAL HEALING
This plane relates to the realm of spirituality,
consciousness, and transcendence. It encompasses
the search for meaning, purpose, and connection
to a higher power or universal consciousness. It
involves aspects such as self-awareness, personal
growth, and the exploration of metaphysical or
transcendent experiences.
Spiritual healing refers to the process of
addressing and nurturing the spiritual aspect of a
person's being in order to promote overall well-
being and harmony.
Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS. https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276.
Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Riyadh. J Relig Health. 2020
Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943-018-0677-0. PMID: 30066265.
SPIRITUAL HEALING
AND NUTRITION
When it comes to food for spiritual
healing, the focus is often on
nourishing the body and supporting
overall well-being, as the physical and
spiritual aspects are interconnected.
While specific food choices may vary
based on individual preferences and
beliefs, There are some general
principles to consider:
1. Whole and
Plant-Based
Foods
Emphasize whole, unprocessed
foods, particularly plant-based
options such as fruits, vegetables,
whole grains, legumes, nuts, and
seeds. These foods are often
considered more vibrant and
energetically connected to nature,
which can support spiritual well-
being.
Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing
science : JJNS. https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276.
Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and
Alternative Medicine, Riyadh. J Relig Health. 2020 Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943-018-0677-0. PMID: 30066265.
2. Mindful
Eating
Practice mindful eating by being present
and fully engaged with your meals.
Slow down, savor the flavors, and
appreciate the nourishment provided by
your food.
Cultivate gratitude for the nourishment
and energy it provides.
Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer
patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS.
https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276.
Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some
Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and Alternative
Medicine, Riyadh. J Relig Health. 2020 Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943-018-
0677-0. PMID: 30066265.
3. Pure and
Clean Foods
Aim for foods that are as close to their
natural state as possible, free from
artificial additives, preservatives, and
chemicals.
This includes choosing organic produce
and minimally processed ingredients to
promote a cleaner and purer energy in
the body.
Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer
patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS.
https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276.
Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some
Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and Alternative
Medicine, Riyadh. J Relig Health. 2020 Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943-
018-0677-0. PMID: 30066265.
4. Water and
Hydration
Water is essential for overall well-
being, including spiritual health. Stay
hydrated by consuming adequate
amounts of clean, purified water.
Some spiritual practices may involve
blessing or infusing water with
positive intentions or using it for
cleansing rituals.
Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS.
https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276.
Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Riyadh. J
Relig Health. 2020 Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943-018-0677-0. PMID: 30066265.
5. Fasting or
Cleansing
Some spiritual traditions incorporate
fasting or cleansing practices as a way to
purify the body and deepen spiritual
connection.
These practices involve temporary
restriction or elimination of certain foods
or beverages for a designated period.
If considering fasting or cleansing, it's
important to do so under proper guidance
and ensure it is suitable for your individual
health needs. Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of
nursing science : JJNS. https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276.
NUTRITIONAL
HERBS FOR
SPIRITUAL
PURPOSE
1. Lavender
2. Holy Basil (Tulsi)
3. Sage
4. Rosemary
5. Chamomile
Lavendar
• Scientific name: Lavandula
• Family: Lamiaceae
• English: lavendar
• Lavender is a versatile herb that is widely
recognized for its pleasant fragrance and numerous
beneficial properties. It has been used for centuries
in various cultures for its calming and soothing
effects. Here are some key aspects of lavender:
• Lavender is known for its calming properties and is
often used to promote relaxation, relieve anxiety,
and enhance sleep. It can be used in the form of
essential oil, herbal tea, or as a dried herb in sachets
or incense.
• Lavender tea is often used for spiritual purposes due
to its calming and soothing properties. It can be
consumed as a warm beverage to support relaxation,
meditation, and overall well-being.
HOLY BASIL (TULSI)
• Scientific name: Ocimum tenuiflorum
• Family: Lamiaceae
• English: Basil
• Holy Basil is considered a sacred herb in many spiritual
traditions. It is believed to have adaptogenic
properties that help reduce stress, promote mental
clarity, and support overall well-being. Holy Basil can
be consumed as a tea or taken as a supplement.
• Holy Basil is believed to have purifying properties that
help cleanse negative energies and promote spiritual
purity. Before engaging in spiritual rituals or practices,
you can drink Holy Basil tea with the intention of
purifying your mind, body, and spirit.
• Holy Basil tea is known to promote mental
clarity and focus, which can be beneficial for
meditation. Drinking Holy Basil tea before or
during your meditation practice can help calm
the mind, deepen your focus, and enhance
your ability to connect with your inner self or
the divine.
• Holy Basil is associated with promoting a
connection to higher consciousness or spiritual
realms. By sipping Holy Basil tea
with reverence and intention, you can invite a
deeper sense of connection, awareness, and
spiritual insights.
• Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer
patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS.
https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276.
• Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some
Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine,
Riyadh. J Relig Health. 2020 Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943-018-0677-0. PMID:
30066265.
SAGE
Scientific name: Salvia officinalis
Family: Lamiaceae
English: Sage
Sage has long been used in spiritual rituals and ceremonies for
its purifying and cleansing properties. Burning dried sage
bundles, also known as smudging, is believed to clear negative
energies and create a sacred space for spiritual practices.
Sage tea has a long history of spiritual and medicinal use in
various cultures. It is commonly associated with purification,
protection, and wisdom.
Sage has been traditionally used for smudging rituals to cleanse
and purify a space or person energetically. Similarly, drinking
sage tea can be seen as an internal cleansing practice, helping to
clear negative energies or stagnant emotions.
Sage tea can aid in grounding and centering oneself. It can help
create a sense of stability and focus, allowing for a more
grounded presence during spiritual practices or daily life
ROSEMARY
• Scientific name: Salvia rosmarinus
• Family: Lamiaceae
• English: Rosemary
• Rosemary is often associated with memory, clarity, and mental focus.
It can be used as an aromatic herb to enhance meditation or
consumed as a tea for its uplifting and stimulating effects.
• Rosemary is often associated with mental clarity and enhancing focus.
Drinking rosemary tea with the intention of sharpening your mind and
improving concentration can support your spiritual practices, such as
meditation or studying sacred texts.
• Rosemary has long been used for its protective and purifying
properties. Drinking rosemary tea can be a symbolic act of purifying
your energy, releasing negative influences, and inviting a sense of
protection during spiritual practices.
• Rosemary is known for its invigorating and uplifting effects. Drinking
rosemary tea can help revitalize your energy and uplift your mood,
creating a positive state of mind for spiritual exploration and growth
CHAMOMILE
Scientific Name: Matricaria recutita
Family: Asteraceae
English: Chamomile
Chamomile is known for its calming and soothing properties. It can
help promote relaxation, reduce anxiety, and support restful sleep.
Chamomile tea is a popular way to enjoy its benefits.
Chamomile tea is well-known for its calming effects on the nervous
system. By promoting relaxation and reducing anxiety, chamomile
tea can create a conducive environment for spiritual practices such
as meditation, prayer, or reflection.
Chamomile tea is believed to have properties that aid in emotional
healing and stress relief. By sipping chamomile tea mindfully, you
can create a safe space to process and release emotions, allowing
for spiritual growth and self-reflection.
Chamomile is known for its association with promoting restful sleep
and vivid dreams. Drinking chamomile tea before bedtime may
enhance dream recall and facilitate intuitive insights during
dreamwork or meditation.
YOGA AND
SPIRITUAL HEALING
Yoga can indeed be a
powerful tool for spiritual
healing. While physical
asanas (postures) are a
popular aspect of yoga, the
practice extends beyond the
physical body and
encompasses mental,
emotional, and spiritual well-
being by the practice of
meditation breathwork and
mindful eating.
‘Jaisa anna, waisa manna’
– We are what we eat.
A very simple saying, yet we fail
understand it.
Food (Aahar) is one of the most
parts of our life that helps keep
hale, and hearty.
However, eating the right
right moderation is very
SATVIK DIET
• A satvik diet is a type of vegetarian diet that follows the principles of
Ayurveda, a traditional system of medicine from India. It is based on the
concept of sattva, which means purity, balance and harmony. Sattvic
foods are believed to promote health, happiness, calmness and mental
clarity.
• A satvik diet consists mainly of fresh fruits, vegetables, sprouted whole
grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, dairy products and herbal teas. It avoids
foods that are stale, processed, fried, spicy, sour or stimulating, such as
meat, fish, eggs, onion, garlic, coffee, alcohol and white sugar.
• Some of the benefits of a satvik diet may include lower risks of heart
disease, cancer and diabetes due to its high intake of fiber, antioxidants
and phytochemicals. It may also support mental health and well-being
by reducing stress and enhancing clarity.
• Fruits: All fresh, ripe and sweet fruits
are sattvic, such as apples, bananas,
berries, grapes, mangoes, melons,
oranges, peaches, pears and plums.
• Vegetables: Most fresh, organic and
lightly cooked vegetables are sattvic,
such as asparagus, broccoli, cabbage,
carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumber,
green beans, lettuce, peas, potatoes,
spinach and squash.
• Grains: Sprouted whole grains are the
most sattvic form of grains, such as
buckwheat, barley, corn, millet, oats,
quinoa, rice and wheat. They can be
cooked or eaten raw. Bread and pasta
made from whole grains are also sattvic
if they are fresh and without
preservatives.
• Legumes: Immature or sprouted legumes and
peanuts are sattvic, such as fresh edamame,
green peas, green beans and mung beans.
Mature legumes such as beans, lentils and
chickpeas are also sattvic if they are well
cooked and seasoned with spices. Soy
products such as tofu and tempeh are also
sattvic if they are organic.
• Nuts and seeds: All nuts and seeds that are
raw or lightly roasted are sattvic, such as
almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, pistachios,
walnuts, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds,
sesame seeds and flax seeds. They can be
eaten whole or made into nut butters or milks.
They should be consumed in moderation as
they are high in fat and calories.
• Dairy products: Dairy products that come from
cows that are fed and milked appropriately are
sattvic, such as milk, yogurt, cheese (especially
• Sweeteners: Natural sweeteners such
as honey (raw), maple syrup (pure),
jaggery (unrefined cane sugar) and
dates (fresh) are sattvic. They should
be used sparingly as they are still high
in sugar.
• Herbal teas: Herbal teas that are
caffeine-free and made from fresh or
dried herbs are sattvic. Some
examples are chamomile tea
(calming), ginger tea (warming), mint
tea (cooling) and tulsi tea (holy basil).
They can be sweetened with a little
honey or maple syrup if desired..
• Spices: Spices that are mild and
aromatic are sattvic. They help to
enhance the flavor and digestibility of
food. Some examples are cardamom
(sweet), cinnamon (sweet), coriander
(cooling), cumin (warming), fennel
A person with satvik prakriti has the following characteristics:
• They are pure, balanced, harmonious, peaceful and virtuous.
• They have a clear and sharp mind, a calm and compassionate
heart, and a strong and healthy body.
• They are intelligent, creative, wise, generous, humble and
truthful.
• They seek knowledge, self-realization and liberation from
suffering.
• They are devoted to their spiritual practice and follow ethical
principles.
• They are attracted to sattvic foods, such as fresh fruits,
vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, dairy products and
herbal teas.
• They avoid rajasic and tamasic foods, such as meat, fish, eggs,
onion, garlic, coffee, alcohol and white sugar.
• They have a balanced lifestyle that includes regular exercise,
meditation, yoga and rest.
https://www.hinduwebsite.com/gunas.asp
https://www.arhantayoga.org/blog/sattva-rajas-tamas-gunas/
RAJSIK DIET
A rajsik diet is a type of diet that follows the principles of rajas guna, one
of the three qualities of nature (prakriti).
A rajsik diet consists mainly of foods that are spicy, hot, stimulating,
sour, bitter, dry or salty. It includes foods that are fried, processed,
refined, preserved or fermented. It also includes foods that are animal
products, stimulants or intoxicants.
A rajsik diet has the following effects on the body, mind and emotions:
• It increases energy, activity, passion, ambition and competitiveness.
• It stimulates the nervous system, the senses and the intellect.
• It creates restlessness, agitation, anxiety, stress and anger.
• It disturbs the balance and harmony of the body and mind.
• It binds one to the fruits of their actions and desires.
https://wholesomeayurveda.com/2017/10/21/sattvic-rajasic-tamasic-ayurveda-food-mind-body/
• Fried, processed, refined or
fermented foods: Such as chips,
nuggets, burgers, pizza, cheese,
pickles, ketchup, vinegar etc.
• Sour or bitter fruits and
vegetables: Such as grapefruit,
lemon, lime, cherry, raspberry, kiwi
etc.
• Old or stale foods: Such as
leftovers, canned foods, frozen
•Meat and fish: Such as salmon, sole, trout, lamb, chicken, turkey, tuna,
eggs etc.
•Excess of sharp spices: Salt, pepper, black pepper, ginger, onion,
garlic, radish etc.
•Stimulants: Coffee, tea, sugar, cola drinks, chocolates, alcoholic drinks
etc.
Rajasik prakriti is characterized by
qualities such as anger, euphoria,
anxiety, fear, irritation, worry,
restlessness, stress, courage,
rumination, determination, chaos.
People with rajasik prakriti are
often ambitious, energetic,
competitive, and adventurous. They
are also prone to emotional
fluctuations, impulsiveness, and
aggression.
Rajasik prakriti is influenced by the
element of fire and the dosha of
pitta.
https://www.yogabasics.com/learn/the-3-gunas-of-nature/
TAMSIK DIET
A tamsik diet is a type of diet that consists of foods that
are dark, dull, stale, spoiled, overcooked, fermented, or
processed.
These foods are said to increase the quality of tamas in the
mind and body, which is associated with ignorance,
inertia, laziness, attachment, depression, confusion,
and grief.
A tamsik diet is considered harmful for one’s physical and
mental health, as it lowers the vitality and clarity of the
person.
• Food and diet like: excess protein,
flesh, egg, soybean, white flour,
fried fast food
• Stimulating diet: spicy and fried food,
alcohol, chillies, sauce, black
pepper, cinnamon, tea
• Acidic diet: preserved fruits, jam,
jelly, flavoured drinks, preserved
food, soups, fermented bread
• Mucus forming diet: milk and milk
products1
• Fish and meat: such as salmon, sole,
trout, lamb, chicken, turkey, tuna,
etc.
• Any canned food: fruits, beans,
vegetables that are sweetened or
salted. Also bottled fruit juices and
fermented foods
https://wholesomeayurveda.com/2017/10/21/sattvic-rajasic-tamasic-ayurveda-food-mind-body/
Tamsik prakriti is one of the three types of
psychological constitution according to Ayurveda
and Yoga.
It is derived from the Sanskrit word tamas, which
means darkness, dullness, or inertia.
Tamsik prakriti is characterized by qualities such
as ignorance, attachment, laziness,
depression, confusion, and grief. People with
tamsik prakriti are often dull, ignorant, passive,
and attached to material things.
They are also prone to mental and physical
diseases, as they lack vitality and clarity. Tamsik
prakriti is influenced by the element of earth and
the dosha of kapha.
MITAHARA
chapter 1 verse 58
(Susnighdha – madhurāhāraśchaturthāmśa –
vivarjitah l Bhujyate śiva – samprītyai mitāhārah sa
uchyate ll)
• Susnighdha – madhura- the food which is fresh, its
juices are intact, has pleasant taste and is not dried
up
• chaturthāmśa – vivarjitah- keep the stomach ¼
empty
• Bhujyate śiva – samprītyai- eat as an offering to
please god shiva
A yogi’s dirt should be simple and bland. Anything that is highly concentrated, causes acidity
in the stomach and overheats the system should be avoided, i.e., greasy, spicy and stale
food.
Food which create toxins and putrefy in the intestine, such as meat should be avoided.
Garlic and asafetida are aphrodisiac in nature and thus should be avoided.
When food is cooked and again reheated after it has gone cold, bacteria have set in, and if this is
eaten it creates fermentation in the stomach, resulting in indigestion, wind and acidity.
Dry food means that which has no natural oil or water left in it. Oil is necessary in minimum
quantities.
Excess salt and acidity imbalance the system, in fact salt directly affects the heart rate, if it is taken
in excess, it makes the heartbeat faster and heats the body
Many different types of vegetables shouldn’t be cooked together as the resulting chemical reactions
can upset the digestive system and disturb body functions.
Whole grains and rice supply essential carbohydrates and vitamin B complex.
Fresh milk and ghee maintains the mucous lining of the digestive tract and
alimentary canal and neutralize any acidity or heat in the stomach.
Sugar is necessary for brain and other body functions.
Honey is recommended as it is predigested and whole food.
Dried ginger is also agreeable
In the Gherand Samhita (5:20) the 'five vegetables' are said to be
balasaka, kalasaka, patolapatraka, vastaka and himalochika. These are -
leafy vegetables which are similar to spinach. Light, easily digestible
pulses such as mung, red lentils, etc. are recommended as they supply
protein, but pulses and gram such as horse gram, which are hard to
digest and create flatulence, are to be avoided. Pure water which is free
of chemicals, excess minerals and harmful bacteria is essential,
particularly for the purification practices.
THANK YOU

More Related Content

What's hot

Stress & Overeating, Understanding The Connection (10.6.15)
Stress & Overeating, Understanding The Connection (10.6.15) Stress & Overeating, Understanding The Connection (10.6.15)
Stress & Overeating, Understanding The Connection (10.6.15) Cleveland Clinic
 
SE Pendant - Scalar Energy, Negative Ions, Far Infrared, Germanium
SE Pendant - Scalar Energy, Negative Ions, Far Infrared, GermaniumSE Pendant - Scalar Energy, Negative Ions, Far Infrared, Germanium
SE Pendant - Scalar Energy, Negative Ions, Far Infrared, GermaniumJudi Jenkins
 
Dr. David Heber - Why Herbalife?
Dr. David Heber - Why Herbalife?Dr. David Heber - Why Herbalife?
Dr. David Heber - Why Herbalife?Sarette Vermaak
 
Change your food change your mood
Change your food change your moodChange your food change your mood
Change your food change your moodPatrick Garrett, DC
 
Innate healing & health realisation
Innate healing & health realisationInnate healing & health realisation
Innate healing & health realisationDr. Satyendra Singh
 
Combating Stress Through Nutrition
Combating Stress Through NutritionCombating Stress Through Nutrition
Combating Stress Through NutritionHealth Yourself
 
The principles of food combining
The principles of food combiningThe principles of food combining
The principles of food combiningRomaLouise
 
Yoga for Antenatal and Postnatal wellbeing by Dr.Nutan
Yoga for Antenatal and Postnatal wellbeing by Dr.NutanYoga for Antenatal and Postnatal wellbeing by Dr.Nutan
Yoga for Antenatal and Postnatal wellbeing by Dr.NutanDr.Nutan Pakhare
 
Healing through fasting
Healing through fastingHealing through fasting
Healing through fastingroxana410
 
DIET
DIET DIET
DIET Shama
 
Concept of Drugless therapies and its relevance in Heath Care
Concept of Drugless therapies and its relevance in Heath CareConcept of Drugless therapies and its relevance in Heath Care
Concept of Drugless therapies and its relevance in Heath CareDr. Satyendra Singh
 
Research proven benefits of yoga
Research proven benefits of yogaResearch proven benefits of yoga
Research proven benefits of yogaOther Mother
 
Juicing and blending
Juicing and blendingJuicing and blending
Juicing and blendingJohn Bergman
 

What's hot (20)

Stress & Overeating, Understanding The Connection (10.6.15)
Stress & Overeating, Understanding The Connection (10.6.15) Stress & Overeating, Understanding The Connection (10.6.15)
Stress & Overeating, Understanding The Connection (10.6.15)
 
Yoga research
Yoga research Yoga research
Yoga research
 
SE Pendant - Scalar Energy, Negative Ions, Far Infrared, Germanium
SE Pendant - Scalar Energy, Negative Ions, Far Infrared, GermaniumSE Pendant - Scalar Energy, Negative Ions, Far Infrared, Germanium
SE Pendant - Scalar Energy, Negative Ions, Far Infrared, Germanium
 
Yoga and stress
Yoga and stressYoga and stress
Yoga and stress
 
Dr. David Heber - Why Herbalife?
Dr. David Heber - Why Herbalife?Dr. David Heber - Why Herbalife?
Dr. David Heber - Why Herbalife?
 
Change your food change your mood
Change your food change your moodChange your food change your mood
Change your food change your mood
 
Yoga Therapy by Dr. Jayshree Yeshwante
Yoga Therapy by Dr. Jayshree YeshwanteYoga Therapy by Dr. Jayshree Yeshwante
Yoga Therapy by Dr. Jayshree Yeshwante
 
Yoga a boon for maternal-child health
Yoga a boon for maternal-child healthYoga a boon for maternal-child health
Yoga a boon for maternal-child health
 
Innate healing & health realisation
Innate healing & health realisationInnate healing & health realisation
Innate healing & health realisation
 
Combating Stress Through Nutrition
Combating Stress Through NutritionCombating Stress Through Nutrition
Combating Stress Through Nutrition
 
The principles of food combining
The principles of food combiningThe principles of food combining
The principles of food combining
 
Yoga nidra
Yoga nidraYoga nidra
Yoga nidra
 
Yoga for Antenatal and Postnatal wellbeing by Dr.Nutan
Yoga for Antenatal and Postnatal wellbeing by Dr.NutanYoga for Antenatal and Postnatal wellbeing by Dr.Nutan
Yoga for Antenatal and Postnatal wellbeing by Dr.Nutan
 
Healing through fasting
Healing through fastingHealing through fasting
Healing through fasting
 
DIET
DIET DIET
DIET
 
Neuropathy
NeuropathyNeuropathy
Neuropathy
 
Concept of Drugless therapies and its relevance in Heath Care
Concept of Drugless therapies and its relevance in Heath CareConcept of Drugless therapies and its relevance in Heath Care
Concept of Drugless therapies and its relevance in Heath Care
 
Yoga present
Yoga presentYoga present
Yoga present
 
Research proven benefits of yoga
Research proven benefits of yogaResearch proven benefits of yoga
Research proven benefits of yoga
 
Juicing and blending
Juicing and blendingJuicing and blending
Juicing and blending
 

Similar to Healing Through Nutrition in All Planes of Being

7. The purpose of natural healthcare.pptx
7. The purpose of natural healthcare.pptx7. The purpose of natural healthcare.pptx
7. The purpose of natural healthcare.pptxKOLEJPERDANA
 
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptx
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptxPHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptx
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptxdrshrutibaid
 
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptx
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptxPHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptx
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptxdrshrutibaid
 
Individual Components
Individual ComponentsIndividual Components
Individual ComponentsZach Roberson
 
unit -1 Basic aspects.pptx
unit -1 Basic aspects.pptxunit -1 Basic aspects.pptx
unit -1 Basic aspects.pptxPreetiChouhan6
 
Unveilin.pdf
Unveilin.pdfUnveilin.pdf
Unveilin.pdfKumar0800
 
Hot Topics In Integrative Medicine Jill Schneiderhan.pptx
Hot Topics In Integrative Medicine Jill Schneiderhan.pptxHot Topics In Integrative Medicine Jill Schneiderhan.pptx
Hot Topics In Integrative Medicine Jill Schneiderhan.pptxssuser1fae2b
 
Athletes, The Immune System & Massage
Athletes, The Immune System & MassageAthletes, The Immune System & Massage
Athletes, The Immune System & Massagesomahealthcare
 
Pathophysiology of Chronic Disease and Anti-inflammatory Diet
Pathophysiology of Chronic Disease and Anti-inflammatory DietPathophysiology of Chronic Disease and Anti-inflammatory Diet
Pathophysiology of Chronic Disease and Anti-inflammatory DietBatoul Ghosn
 
Growth Factors in the Human Body: A Conceptual Update_Crimson Publishers
Growth Factors in the Human Body: A Conceptual Update_Crimson PublishersGrowth Factors in the Human Body: A Conceptual Update_Crimson Publishers
Growth Factors in the Human Body: A Conceptual Update_Crimson PublishersCrimsonpublishersCJMI
 
7 Keys To Optimal Health
7 Keys To Optimal Health7 Keys To Optimal Health
7 Keys To Optimal HealthGo BellaVita
 
Regenerative Medicine: Meaning, Innovations, Challenges & More | The Lifescie...
Regenerative Medicine: Meaning, Innovations, Challenges & More | The Lifescie...Regenerative Medicine: Meaning, Innovations, Challenges & More | The Lifescie...
Regenerative Medicine: Meaning, Innovations, Challenges & More | The Lifescie...The Lifesciences Magazine
 
Introduction This paper shed light on the effectivenes of.pdf
Introduction This paper shed light on the effectivenes of.pdfIntroduction This paper shed light on the effectivenes of.pdf
Introduction This paper shed light on the effectivenes of.pdfbkbk37
 
Health and vitamin foods
Health  and vitamin foodsHealth  and vitamin foods
Health and vitamin foodsVinya P
 
Hygienic problems of Healthy lifestyle & Persona Hygiene
Hygienic problems of Healthy lifestyle & Persona HygieneHygienic problems of Healthy lifestyle & Persona Hygiene
Hygienic problems of Healthy lifestyle & Persona HygieneEneutron
 
Nutraceuticals by Priyanka Khokhar
Nutraceuticals by Priyanka KhokharNutraceuticals by Priyanka Khokhar
Nutraceuticals by Priyanka KhokharPriyanka khokhar
 
Wound healing potential of some medicinal plants
Wound healing potential of some medicinal plantsWound healing potential of some medicinal plants
Wound healing potential of some medicinal plantsGulzar Alam
 

Similar to Healing Through Nutrition in All Planes of Being (20)

7. The purpose of natural healthcare.pptx
7. The purpose of natural healthcare.pptx7. The purpose of natural healthcare.pptx
7. The purpose of natural healthcare.pptx
 
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptx
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptxPHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptx
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptx
 
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptx
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptxPHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptx
PHILOSOPHY, EVOLUTION AND HISTORY OF NATUROPATHIC DIET.pptx
 
Nutrition Food
Nutrition FoodNutrition Food
Nutrition Food
 
Individual Components
Individual ComponentsIndividual Components
Individual Components
 
unit -1 Basic aspects.pptx
unit -1 Basic aspects.pptxunit -1 Basic aspects.pptx
unit -1 Basic aspects.pptx
 
Unveilin.pdf
Unveilin.pdfUnveilin.pdf
Unveilin.pdf
 
Basic about nutrition
Basic about nutritionBasic about nutrition
Basic about nutrition
 
Hot Topics In Integrative Medicine Jill Schneiderhan.pptx
Hot Topics In Integrative Medicine Jill Schneiderhan.pptxHot Topics In Integrative Medicine Jill Schneiderhan.pptx
Hot Topics In Integrative Medicine Jill Schneiderhan.pptx
 
Athletes, The Immune System & Massage
Athletes, The Immune System & MassageAthletes, The Immune System & Massage
Athletes, The Immune System & Massage
 
Pathophysiology of Chronic Disease and Anti-inflammatory Diet
Pathophysiology of Chronic Disease and Anti-inflammatory DietPathophysiology of Chronic Disease and Anti-inflammatory Diet
Pathophysiology of Chronic Disease and Anti-inflammatory Diet
 
Growth Factors in the Human Body: A Conceptual Update_Crimson Publishers
Growth Factors in the Human Body: A Conceptual Update_Crimson PublishersGrowth Factors in the Human Body: A Conceptual Update_Crimson Publishers
Growth Factors in the Human Body: A Conceptual Update_Crimson Publishers
 
7 Keys To Optimal Health
7 Keys To Optimal Health7 Keys To Optimal Health
7 Keys To Optimal Health
 
Regenerative Medicine: Meaning, Innovations, Challenges & More | The Lifescie...
Regenerative Medicine: Meaning, Innovations, Challenges & More | The Lifescie...Regenerative Medicine: Meaning, Innovations, Challenges & More | The Lifescie...
Regenerative Medicine: Meaning, Innovations, Challenges & More | The Lifescie...
 
Introduction This paper shed light on the effectivenes of.pdf
Introduction This paper shed light on the effectivenes of.pdfIntroduction This paper shed light on the effectivenes of.pdf
Introduction This paper shed light on the effectivenes of.pdf
 
Colostrum full
Colostrum fullColostrum full
Colostrum full
 
Health and vitamin foods
Health  and vitamin foodsHealth  and vitamin foods
Health and vitamin foods
 
Hygienic problems of Healthy lifestyle & Persona Hygiene
Hygienic problems of Healthy lifestyle & Persona HygieneHygienic problems of Healthy lifestyle & Persona Hygiene
Hygienic problems of Healthy lifestyle & Persona Hygiene
 
Nutraceuticals by Priyanka Khokhar
Nutraceuticals by Priyanka KhokharNutraceuticals by Priyanka Khokhar
Nutraceuticals by Priyanka Khokhar
 
Wound healing potential of some medicinal plants
Wound healing potential of some medicinal plantsWound healing potential of some medicinal plants
Wound healing potential of some medicinal plants
 

Recently uploaded

SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES.pptx made by Sapna Thakur
SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES.pptx made by Sapna ThakurSCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES.pptx made by Sapna Thakur
SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES.pptx made by Sapna ThakurSapna Thakur
 
Tans femoral Amputee : Prosthetics Knee Joints.pptx
Tans femoral Amputee : Prosthetics Knee Joints.pptxTans femoral Amputee : Prosthetics Knee Joints.pptx
Tans femoral Amputee : Prosthetics Knee Joints.pptxKezaiah S
 
Presentation for Bella Mahl 2024-03-28-24-MW-Overview-Bella.pptx
Presentation for Bella Mahl 2024-03-28-24-MW-Overview-Bella.pptxPresentation for Bella Mahl 2024-03-28-24-MW-Overview-Bella.pptx
Presentation for Bella Mahl 2024-03-28-24-MW-Overview-Bella.pptxpdamico1
 
Informed Consent Empowering Healthcare Decision-Making.pptx
Informed Consent Empowering Healthcare Decision-Making.pptxInformed Consent Empowering Healthcare Decision-Making.pptx
Informed Consent Empowering Healthcare Decision-Making.pptxSasikiranMarri
 
VarSeq 2.6.0: Advancing Pharmacogenomics and Genomic Analysis
VarSeq 2.6.0: Advancing Pharmacogenomics and Genomic AnalysisVarSeq 2.6.0: Advancing Pharmacogenomics and Genomic Analysis
VarSeq 2.6.0: Advancing Pharmacogenomics and Genomic AnalysisGolden Helix
 
Rheumatoid arthritis - Musculoskeletal disorders.ppt
Rheumatoid arthritis - Musculoskeletal disorders.pptRheumatoid arthritis - Musculoskeletal disorders.ppt
Rheumatoid arthritis - Musculoskeletal disorders.pptraviapr7
 
CCSC6142 Week 3 Research ethics - Long Hoang.pdf
CCSC6142 Week 3 Research ethics - Long Hoang.pdfCCSC6142 Week 3 Research ethics - Long Hoang.pdf
CCSC6142 Week 3 Research ethics - Long Hoang.pdfMyThaoAiDoan
 
Presentation on General Anesthetics pdf.
Presentation on General Anesthetics pdf.Presentation on General Anesthetics pdf.
Presentation on General Anesthetics pdf.Prerana Jadhav
 
Presentation on Parasympathetic Nervous System
Presentation on Parasympathetic Nervous SystemPresentation on Parasympathetic Nervous System
Presentation on Parasympathetic Nervous SystemPrerana Jadhav
 
Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein antibody associated disease (MOGAD)
Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein antibody associated disease (MOGAD)Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein antibody associated disease (MOGAD)
Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein antibody associated disease (MOGAD)MohamadAlhes
 
Primary headache and facial pain. (2024)
Primary headache and facial pain. (2024)Primary headache and facial pain. (2024)
Primary headache and facial pain. (2024)Mohamed Rizk Khodair
 
Units of Radiation Measurements, Quality Specification, Half-Value Thickness,...
Units of Radiation Measurements, Quality Specification, Half-Value Thickness,...Units of Radiation Measurements, Quality Specification, Half-Value Thickness,...
Units of Radiation Measurements, Quality Specification, Half-Value Thickness,...Dr. Dheeraj Kumar
 
Radiation Dosimetry Parameters and Isodose Curves.pptx
Radiation Dosimetry Parameters and Isodose Curves.pptxRadiation Dosimetry Parameters and Isodose Curves.pptx
Radiation Dosimetry Parameters and Isodose Curves.pptxDr. Dheeraj Kumar
 
Biomechanics- Shoulder Joint!!!!!!!!!!!!
Biomechanics- Shoulder Joint!!!!!!!!!!!!Biomechanics- Shoulder Joint!!!!!!!!!!!!
Biomechanics- Shoulder Joint!!!!!!!!!!!!ibtesaam huma
 
Culture and Health Disorders Social change.pptx
Culture and Health Disorders Social change.pptxCulture and Health Disorders Social change.pptx
Culture and Health Disorders Social change.pptxDr. Dheeraj Kumar
 
Study on the Impact of FOCUS-PDCA Management Model on the Disinfection Qualit...
Study on the Impact of FOCUS-PDCA Management Model on the Disinfection Qualit...Study on the Impact of FOCUS-PDCA Management Model on the Disinfection Qualit...
Study on the Impact of FOCUS-PDCA Management Model on the Disinfection Qualit...MehranMouzam
 
ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY by Dr. Akebom Kidanemariam
ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY by Dr. Akebom KidanemariamANEMIA IN PREGNANCY by Dr. Akebom Kidanemariam
ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY by Dr. Akebom KidanemariamAkebom Gebremichael
 
The next social challenge to public health: the information environment.pptx
The next social challenge to public health:  the information environment.pptxThe next social challenge to public health:  the information environment.pptx
The next social challenge to public health: the information environment.pptxTina Purnat
 
Plant Fibres used as Surgical Dressings PDF.pdf
Plant Fibres used as Surgical Dressings PDF.pdfPlant Fibres used as Surgical Dressings PDF.pdf
Plant Fibres used as Surgical Dressings PDF.pdfDivya Kanojiya
 
Introduction to Sports Injuries by- Dr. Anjali Rai
Introduction to Sports Injuries by- Dr. Anjali RaiIntroduction to Sports Injuries by- Dr. Anjali Rai
Introduction to Sports Injuries by- Dr. Anjali RaiGoogle
 

Recently uploaded (20)

SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES.pptx made by Sapna Thakur
SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES.pptx made by Sapna ThakurSCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES.pptx made by Sapna Thakur
SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES.pptx made by Sapna Thakur
 
Tans femoral Amputee : Prosthetics Knee Joints.pptx
Tans femoral Amputee : Prosthetics Knee Joints.pptxTans femoral Amputee : Prosthetics Knee Joints.pptx
Tans femoral Amputee : Prosthetics Knee Joints.pptx
 
Presentation for Bella Mahl 2024-03-28-24-MW-Overview-Bella.pptx
Presentation for Bella Mahl 2024-03-28-24-MW-Overview-Bella.pptxPresentation for Bella Mahl 2024-03-28-24-MW-Overview-Bella.pptx
Presentation for Bella Mahl 2024-03-28-24-MW-Overview-Bella.pptx
 
Informed Consent Empowering Healthcare Decision-Making.pptx
Informed Consent Empowering Healthcare Decision-Making.pptxInformed Consent Empowering Healthcare Decision-Making.pptx
Informed Consent Empowering Healthcare Decision-Making.pptx
 
VarSeq 2.6.0: Advancing Pharmacogenomics and Genomic Analysis
VarSeq 2.6.0: Advancing Pharmacogenomics and Genomic AnalysisVarSeq 2.6.0: Advancing Pharmacogenomics and Genomic Analysis
VarSeq 2.6.0: Advancing Pharmacogenomics and Genomic Analysis
 
Rheumatoid arthritis - Musculoskeletal disorders.ppt
Rheumatoid arthritis - Musculoskeletal disorders.pptRheumatoid arthritis - Musculoskeletal disorders.ppt
Rheumatoid arthritis - Musculoskeletal disorders.ppt
 
CCSC6142 Week 3 Research ethics - Long Hoang.pdf
CCSC6142 Week 3 Research ethics - Long Hoang.pdfCCSC6142 Week 3 Research ethics - Long Hoang.pdf
CCSC6142 Week 3 Research ethics - Long Hoang.pdf
 
Presentation on General Anesthetics pdf.
Presentation on General Anesthetics pdf.Presentation on General Anesthetics pdf.
Presentation on General Anesthetics pdf.
 
Presentation on Parasympathetic Nervous System
Presentation on Parasympathetic Nervous SystemPresentation on Parasympathetic Nervous System
Presentation on Parasympathetic Nervous System
 
Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein antibody associated disease (MOGAD)
Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein antibody associated disease (MOGAD)Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein antibody associated disease (MOGAD)
Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein antibody associated disease (MOGAD)
 
Primary headache and facial pain. (2024)
Primary headache and facial pain. (2024)Primary headache and facial pain. (2024)
Primary headache and facial pain. (2024)
 
Units of Radiation Measurements, Quality Specification, Half-Value Thickness,...
Units of Radiation Measurements, Quality Specification, Half-Value Thickness,...Units of Radiation Measurements, Quality Specification, Half-Value Thickness,...
Units of Radiation Measurements, Quality Specification, Half-Value Thickness,...
 
Radiation Dosimetry Parameters and Isodose Curves.pptx
Radiation Dosimetry Parameters and Isodose Curves.pptxRadiation Dosimetry Parameters and Isodose Curves.pptx
Radiation Dosimetry Parameters and Isodose Curves.pptx
 
Biomechanics- Shoulder Joint!!!!!!!!!!!!
Biomechanics- Shoulder Joint!!!!!!!!!!!!Biomechanics- Shoulder Joint!!!!!!!!!!!!
Biomechanics- Shoulder Joint!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Culture and Health Disorders Social change.pptx
Culture and Health Disorders Social change.pptxCulture and Health Disorders Social change.pptx
Culture and Health Disorders Social change.pptx
 
Study on the Impact of FOCUS-PDCA Management Model on the Disinfection Qualit...
Study on the Impact of FOCUS-PDCA Management Model on the Disinfection Qualit...Study on the Impact of FOCUS-PDCA Management Model on the Disinfection Qualit...
Study on the Impact of FOCUS-PDCA Management Model on the Disinfection Qualit...
 
ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY by Dr. Akebom Kidanemariam
ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY by Dr. Akebom KidanemariamANEMIA IN PREGNANCY by Dr. Akebom Kidanemariam
ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY by Dr. Akebom Kidanemariam
 
The next social challenge to public health: the information environment.pptx
The next social challenge to public health:  the information environment.pptxThe next social challenge to public health:  the information environment.pptx
The next social challenge to public health: the information environment.pptx
 
Plant Fibres used as Surgical Dressings PDF.pdf
Plant Fibres used as Surgical Dressings PDF.pdfPlant Fibres used as Surgical Dressings PDF.pdf
Plant Fibres used as Surgical Dressings PDF.pdf
 
Introduction to Sports Injuries by- Dr. Anjali Rai
Introduction to Sports Injuries by- Dr. Anjali RaiIntroduction to Sports Injuries by- Dr. Anjali Rai
Introduction to Sports Injuries by- Dr. Anjali Rai
 

Healing Through Nutrition in All Planes of Being

  • 1. HEALING THROUGH NUTRITION -IN ALL PLANES OF BEING DR. SHRUTI BAID MD. NUTRITION AND DIETETICS JR1
  • 2. INTRODUC TION The phrase "healing through nutrition in all planes of being" suggests a holistic approach to healing that incorporates nutrition as a fundamental aspect across various aspects of a person's existence. Let's break it down:
  • 3. Healing Refers to the process of restoring health, balance, or well-being. It involves addressing physical, mental, emotional, or spiritual imbalances to promote overall wellness. Constructive principle: Naturopathy is a system of man building in harmony with the constructive principles of Nature on physical, mental, moral and spiritual planes of living Destructive principle: It is that principle which disintegrates and destroys the existing forms and types and whose activity in nature is designated as devolutionary.
  • 4. NUTRITION Relates to the intake of nourishing substances through food or supplements. Proper nutrition provides the body with essential nutrients for growth, development, and maintenance of bodily functions. Nutrition is necessary for healing because it provides the energy and nutrients that your body needs to repair and rebuild damaged tissues. Nutrition also helps to prevent infection and complications that can slow down or impair wound healing. Some of the nutrients that are especially important for wound healing are protein, iron, zinc, and vitamins A and C.
  • 5. PLANES OF BEING The concept of "planes of being" is often associated with spiritual or philosophical frameworks that describe different dimensions or levels of existence beyond the physical realm. These planes are thought to encompass various aspects of consciousness, existence, and spiritual development. The interpretation and understanding of planes of being can vary across different belief systems and philosophical perspectives.
  • 6. According to WHO, health has been defined as "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity" There are four planes of being:- 1. PHYSICAL PLANE 2. MENTAL PLANE 3. EMOTIONAL PLANE 4. SPIRITUAL PLANE
  • 7. PHYSICAL PLANE This is the plane of existence that encompasses the material world and the physical body. It includes the tangible and observable aspects of life, such as the physical environment, sensory experiences, and biological processes.
  • 8. MENTAL PLANE This plane relates to the realm of thoughts, emotions, and cognition. It involves the mind and psychological processes, including perception, reasoning, memory, and the formation of beliefs and attitudes.
  • 9. EMOTIONAL PLANE The emotional plane refers to the realm of feelings, emotions, and the subjective experience of different emotional states. It involves the awareness and expression of emotions, such as joy, sadness, love, anger, and compassion.
  • 10. SPIRITUAL PLANE This plane relates to the realm of spirituality, consciousness, and transcendence. It encompasses the search for meaning, purpose, and connection to a higher power or universal consciousness. It involves aspects such as self- awareness, personal growth, and the exploration of metaphysical or transcendent experiences.
  • 11. PHYSICAL HEALING Physical healing refers to the process of restoring and repairing the physical body to a state of health and well-being after an injury, illness, or medical intervention. It involves the recovery of damaged tissues, restoration of bodily functions, and overall improvement in physical health.
  • 12. RECOVERY OF DAMAGED TISSUE A. TISSUE REPAIR • Tissue Repair: When the body is injured, damaged tissues undergo a healing process. • This process involves various stages, including inflammation, tissue regeneration, and remodeling. • Cells at the site of injury multiply, new blood vessels form, and collagen is synthesized to rebuild and strengthen the damaged area.
  • 13. NUTRITION AND TISSUE REPAIR Nutrition plays a critical role in tissue repair and wound healing. The body requires specific nutrients to support the healing process and facilitate the repair of damaged tissues. 1. Proteins 2. Vitamin C 3. Vitamin A 4. Zinc 5. Omega 3 Fatty acid
  • 14. 1. PROTEIN AND WOUND HEALING Proteins provide the main building blocks for tissue growth, cell renewal, and repair throughout the wound healing process. Proteins significantly affect the entire process of wound healing through their roles in RNA and DNA synthesis, collagen and elastic tissue formation, immune system function, epidermal growth, and keratinization. Therefore, it is vital to provide proteins for wound healing. Proteins like interleukins and chemokines are released during the inflammatory phase of wound healing. They help recruit immune cells to the wound site and regulate the inflammatory response.
  • 15. Certain proteins, such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), are released by platelets and immune cells. They promote cell migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels) in the wound area.​ Proteins like collagen, fibronectin, and elastin form the structural framework of the ECM, which provides support for cell migration and tissue regeneration.​ Proteins like vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulate the growth of new blood vessels into the wound, providing oxygen and nutrients necessary for healing.​ Wang, X., Yu, Z., Zhou, S., Shen, S., & Chen, W. (2022). The Effect of a Compound Protein on Wound Healing and Nutritional Status. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2022, 4231516. https://doi.org/10.1155/2022/4231516
  • 16. 2. VITAMIN C AND WOUND HEALING Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid (AA), is involved in all phases of wound healing. In the inflammatory phase it is required for neutrophil apoptosis and clearance. During the proliferative phase, AA contributes towards synthesis, maturation, secretion and degradation of collagen. Deficiencies affect the maturation phase by altering collagen production and scar formation. The body strives to maintain homeostasis of AA, thereby ensuring availability for collagen synthesis. After wounding, plasma and tissue levels of AA diminish and, as a consequence, supplements may be useful for healing Moores J. Vitamin C: a wound healing perspective. Br J Community Nurs. 2013 Dec;Suppl:S6, S8-11. doi: 10.12968/bjcn.2013.18.su p12.s6. PMID: 24796079.
  • 17. Vitamin A functions mostly through nuclear retinoic acid receptors, retinoid X receptors, and peroxisome proliferator- activated receptors. Retinoids regulate the growth and differentiation of many cell types within skin, and its deficiency leads to abnormal epithelial keratinization. In wounded tissue, vitamin A stimulates epidermal turnover, increases the rate of re-epithelialization, and restores epithelial structure. Retinoids have the unique ability to reverse the inhibitory effects of anti-inflammatory steroids on wound healing. retinoic acid has been demonstrated to enhance production of extracellular matrix components such as collagen type I and fibronectin, increase proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts, and decrease levels of degrading matrix metalloproteinases. Polcz ME, Barbul A. The Role of Vitamin A in Wound Healing. Nutr Clin Pract. 2019 Oct;34(5):695-700. doi: 10.1002/ncp.10376. Epub 2019 Aug 7. PMID: 31389093. 3. VITAMIN A AND WOUND HEALING
  • 18. 4. ZINC AND WOUND HEALING Zinc is a micronutrient that is essential to human health. Zinc plays a major role in regulating every phase of the wound healing process; ranging from membrane repair, oxidative stress, coagulation, inflammation and immune defense, tissue are- epithelialization, angiogenesis, to fibrosis/scar formation. ZINC RICH SOURCES ARE: 1. Legumes 2. Nuts 3. Wholegrains (quinoa, oats, wheat, rice) 4. Eggs 5. Dark chocolates 6. Dairy Lin, P. H., Sermersheim, M., Li, H., Lee, P. H. U., Steinberg, S. M., & Ma, J. (2017). Zinc in Wound Healing Modulation. Nutrients, 10(1), 16. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010016
  • 19. B. Immune Response The immune system plays a crucial role in physical healing. It helps to fight off infections, remove debris, and support tissue repair. Inflammation is a natural part of the immune response and is necessary for healing, but excessive or prolonged inflammation can delay the healing process.
  • 20. NUTRITION AND IMMUNE RESPONSE Nutrition plays a vital role in supporting immune response. A well-balanced diet, rich in essential nutrients, helps maintain a strong and efficient immune system. some key nutrients and their roles in supporting immune function: 1.Protein 2.Vitamin C 3.Vitamin D 4.Zinc 5.Probiotics 6.Antioxidants Childs, C. E., Calder, P. C., & Miles, E. A. (2019). Diet and Immune Function. Nutrients, 11(8), 1933. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081933
  • 21. 1. PROTEIN AND IMMUNE RESPONSE Li P, Yin YL, Li D, Kim SW, Wu G. Amino acids and immune function. Br J Nutr. 2007 Aug;98(2):237-52. doi: 10.1017/S000711450769936X. Epub 2007 Apr 3. PMID: 17403271.
  • 22. 2. VITAMIN C AND IMMUNE RESPONSE Vitamin C contributes to immune defense by supporting various cellular functions of both the innate and adaptive immune system. Vitamin C supports epithelial barrier function against pathogens and promotes the oxidant scavenging activity of the skin, thereby potentially protecting against environmental oxidative stress. It accumulates in phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils, and can enhance chemotaxis, phagocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species, and ultimately microbial killing. It is also needed for apoptosis and clearance of the spent neutrophils from sites of infection by macrophages, thereby decreasing necrosis/NETosis and potential tissue damage. Carr, A. C., & Maggini, S. (2017). Vitamin C and Immune Function. Nutrients, 9(11), 1211. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9111211
  • 23. 3. VITAMIN D AND IMMUNE RESPONSE Vitamin D has numerous effects on cells within the immune system. It inhibits B cell proliferation and blocks B cell differentiation and immunoglobulin secretion. Vitamin D additionally suppresses T cell proliferation and results in a shift from a Th1 to a Th2 phenotype. Furthermore, it affects T cell maturation with a skewing away from the inflammatory Th17 phenotype and facilitates the induction of T regulatory cells. These effects result in decreased production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-17, IL-21) with increased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10. Vitamin D also has effects on monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs). It inhibits monocyte production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and TNFα Aranow C. (2011). Vitamin D and the immune system. Journal of investigative medicine : the official publication of the American Federation for Clinical Research, 59(6), 881–886. https://doi.org/10.2310/JIM.0b013e31821b8755
  • 24. 4. ZINC AND IMMUNE RESPONSE Zinc affects multiple aspects of the immune system. Zinc is crucial for normal development and function of cells mediating innate immunity, neutrophils, and NK cells. Macrophages also are affected by zinc deficiency. Phagocytosis, intracellular killing, and cytokine production all are affected by zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency adversely affects the growth and function of T and B cells. The ability of zinc to function as an anti- oxidant and stabilize membranes suggests that it has a role in the prevention of free radical-induced injury during inflammatory processes. Prasad A. S. (2008). Zinc in human health: effect of zinc on immune cells. Molecular medicine (Cambridge, Mass.), 14(5-6), 353–357. https://doi.org/10.2119/2008-
  • 25. 5. PROBIOTICS AND IMMUNE RESPONSE Probiotics regulate host innate and adaptive immune responses by modulating the functions of dendritic cells, macrophages, and T and B lymphocytes. One of the mechanisms of probiotics regulating immunomodulatory functions is through the activation of toll-like receptors. Yan, F., & Polk, D. B. (2011). Probiotics and immune health. Current opinion in gastroenterology, 27(6), 496– 501. https://doi.org/10.1097/MOG.0b013e32834baa4d
  • 26. 6. ANTIOXIDANTS AND IMMUNE RESPONSE • Antioxidants, such as vitamins A and E, selenium, and flavonoids, help protect immune cells from oxidative stress. • They are found in colorful fruits and vegetables, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. Bendich A. Physiological role of antioxidants in the immune system. J Dairy Sci. 1993 Sep;76(9):2789- 94. doi: 10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(93)77617-1. PMID: 8227682.
  • 27. Mental healing, also known as psychological healing, refers to the process of addressing and recovering from emotional or psychological distress, trauma, or imbalances. It involves taking steps to restore and promote mental well-being. MENTAL HEALING
  • 28. GUT – BRAIN AXIS The brain and stomach are intricately connected through a bidirectional communication pathway known as the gut-brain axis. This axis involves complex interactions between the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the brain and spinal cord, and the enteric nervous system (ENS), which is a network of neurons within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.
  • 29. Vagus Nerve: The vagus nerve is the primary pathway through which signals are transmitted between the gut and the brain. It is the longest cranial nerve and connects various organs in the gut, including the stomach and intestines, to the brain. The vagus nerve carries signals in both directions, allowing for bidirectional communication. Neurotransmitters and Hormones: The gut produces and releases various neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which play essential roles in regulating mood, emotions, and cognitive function. Hormones such as ghrelin, leptin, and cholecystokinin, which are involved in appetite regulation, are also part of the gut- brain axis. Gut Microbiota: The gut is home to a vast community of microorganisms, collectively known as the gut microbiota. These microbes have a symbiotic relationship with the host and play a crucial role in gut health and overall well-being. The gut microbiota produces neurotransmitters, vitamins, and short-chain fatty acids that can influence brain function and behavior. Immune System: The gut is a significant component of the immune system, and immune cells in the gut interact with the nervous system. Immune activation in the gut can influence brain function and has been linked to the development of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Stress Response: The gut-brain axis is closely involved in the body's response to stress. Stressful experiences can lead to changes in gut motility, secretion, and permeability. Conversely, disturbances in the gut, such as dysbiosis (imbalances in the gut microbiota) or inflammation, can activate stress pathways and impact brain function, potentially contributing to anxiety, depression, or other stress-related disorders
  • 30.
  • 31. GUT DYSBIOSIS AND DEPRESSION The mechanisms underlying the association between gut dysbiosis, and depression are still being studied, but several potential mechanisms have been proposed. • Inflammation: Dysbiosis can lead to a disruption of the intestinal barrier, resulting in increased intestinal permeability (leaky gut). This can allow the translocation of bacterial components into the bloodstream, triggering an immune response and systemic inflammation. Chronic inflammation has been linked to the development and progression of depression. • Neurotransmitter Alterations: The gut microbiota plays a role in the production and regulation of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which are involved in mood regulation. Dysbiosis can affect the balance of these neurotransmitters, potentially contributing to depressive symptoms.
  • 32. • HPA Axis Dysregulation: The gut microbiota influences the hypothalamic-pituitary- adrenal (HPA) axis, which is involved in the regulation of the body's stress response. Dysbiosis can affect HPA axis function, leading to dysregulation of stress hormone production, such as cortisol. Altered HPA axis activity has been implicated in the development of depression. • Serotonin Pathway: Serotonin, often referred to as the "happy hormone," is primarily produced in the gut. Dysbiosis can affect serotonin production and metabolism, potentially influencing mood and contributing to depressive symptoms. Zheng, P., Zeng, B., Zhou, C., Liu, M., Fang, Z., Xu, X., Zeng, L., Chen, J., Fan, S., Du, X., Zhang, X., Yang, D., Yang, Y., Meng, H., Li, W., Melgiri, N., Licinio, J., Wei, H., & Xie, P. (2016). Gut microbiome remodeling induces depressive-like behaviors through a pathway mediated by the host’s metabolism. Molecular Psychiatry. https://doi.org/10.1038/mp.2016.44.
  • 33. Nutrition can play a role in supporting mental health and potentially alleviating symptoms of depression. While a healthy diet alone cannot cure depression, it can complement other treatment approaches and contribute to overall well-being. Here are some ways in which nutrition can be relevant to depression: 1.Balanced Diet 2.Omega 3 Fatty Acid 3.Vitamin B 4.Antioxidant 5.Tryptophan 6.Probiotics and Prebiotics Li Y, Lv MR, Wei YJ, Sun L, Zhang JX, Zhang HG, Li B. Dietary patterns and depression risk: A meta-analysis. Psychiatry Res. 2017 Jul;253:373-382. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.04.020. Epub 2017 Apr 11. PMID: 28431261.
  • 34. BALANCED DIET AND DEPRESSION • A balanced diet can also affect mental health, as some nutrients are involved in the production and regulation of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, which affect mood, cognition and behavior. Some studies have suggested that a balanced diet can help reduce the risk of depression and improve its symptoms. • Some general principles of a balanced diet are: • Eating a variety of foods from different food groups, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, low-fat dairy products, nuts, seeds and healthy fats. • Eating more plant-based foods than animal-based foods, as they provide more antioxidants, fiber and phytochemicals that can protect against oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain. • Eating moderate amounts of carbohydrates, preferably from complex sources such as whole grains, legumes and starchy vegetables, as they provide glucose for the brain and can enhance serotonin levels.
  • 35. • Eating adequate amounts of protein, preferably from lean sources such as fish, poultry, eggs and soy products, as they provide amino acids for the synthesis of neurotransmitters. • Eating adequate amounts of healthy fats, especially omega-3 fatty acids from fish, flaxseeds, walnuts and canola oil, as they are essential for the structure and function of neuronal membranes and can modulate the serotonin and dopamine systems. • Eating adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals, especially B vitamins (such as folate, B6 and B12), vitamin D, selenium and zinc, as they are cofactors for various enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and metabolism. • Limiting the intake of processed foods, refined sugars, saturated fats, trans fats, alcohol and caffeine, as they can increase oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain and interfere with neurotransmitter function. • Głąbska D, Guzek D, Groele B, Gutkowska K. Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Mental Health in Adults: A Systematic Review. Nutrients. 2020 Jan 1;12(1):115. doi: 10.3390/nu12010115. PMID: 31906271; PMCID: PMC7019743. • Diet and depression - Harvard Health
  • 36. OMEGA 3 FATTY ACID Omega-3 fatty acids are also involved in the synthesis and signaling of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, which are important for mood regulation, cognition and behavior. Some studies have suggested that omega-3 fatty acids may have beneficial effects on depression and other mood disorders. The possible mechanisms of action include: • Increasing the fluidity and permeability of neuronal membranes, which may enhance the transmission and reception of neurotransmitters. • Reducing the production and activity of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), which may induce depressive symptoms by affecting the serotonin and dopamine systems. • Modulating the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which may reduce the secretion of cortisol and improve the negative feedback regulation of stress hormones. • Increasing the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which may promote neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival in the https://naturalpath.net/natural-news/omega-3-fatty-acids-and-depression/
  • 37. • Flaxseeds and flaxseed oil, which contain ALA, a type of omega-3 fatty acid that can be converted into EPA and DHA in the body, but at a low efficiency. • Chia seeds, which are another source of ALA and provide fiber, protein and minerals. • Walnuts and walnut oil, which are rich in ALA and contain other healthy fats, antioxidants and phytochemicals. • Soybeans and soybean oil, which contain ALA and also provide protein, fiber and isoflavones. • Canola oil, which is a common cooking oil that contains ALA and also has a high smoke point
  • 38. VITAMIN B AND DEPRESSION • . Some of them are also involved in the production and regulation of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, which affect mood, cognition and behavior. • Some studies have suggested that vitamin B deficiency may be associated with depression, as low levels of vitamin B can impair the function of the neurotransmitter systems and increase the risk of oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain. However, the evidence is not conclusive, and more research is needed to establish a causal link between vitamin B and depression. • Dairy products, such as milk, cheese and yogurt, which are good sources of vitamin B2 (riboflavin), B5 (pantothenic acid) and B12 • Whole grains, such as oats, barley and brown Mikkelsen K, Stojanovska L, Apostolopoulos V. The Effects of Vitamin B in Depression. Curr Med Chem. 2016;23(38):4317-4337. doi: 10.2174/0929867323666160920110810. PMID: 27655070.
  • 39. ANTIOXIDANTS AND DEPRESSION • One of the biological factors that may contribute to depression and anxiety is the imbalance between the antioxidant defense system and the oxidative stress pathway in the brain. • Several studies have shown that patients with depression and anxiety have lower levels of antioxidants and higher levels of oxidative stress markers in their blood, cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue compared to healthy controls. • Moreover, oxidative stress can affect the neurotransmission of serotonin, dopamine, glutamate and GABA, which are involved in the regulation of mood, cognition and behavior. • Therefore, antioxidants may play a role in the prevention and treatment of depression and anxiety by scavenging ROS and RNS, restoring the redox balance, protecting the neuronal integrity and function, modulating the neurotransmitter systems and reducing the inflammation in the brain. • Xu Y, Wang C, Klabnik JJ, O'Donnell JM. Novel therapeutic targets in depression and anxiety: antioxidants as a candidate treatment. Curr Neuropharmacol. 2014 Mar;12(2):108-19. doi: 10.2174/1570159X11666131120231448. PMID: 24669206; PMCID: PMC3964743. • Gautam M, Agrawal M, Gautam M, Sharma P, Gautam AS, Gautam S. Role of antioxidants in generalised anxiety disorder and depression. Indian J Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;54(3):244-7. doi: 10.4103/0019-5545.102424. PMID: 23226848; PMCID: PMC3512361.
  • 40. Some foods that are rich in antioxidants and may help with depression are: • Berries, such as blueberries, strawberries, raspberries and cranberries, which contain flavonoids, a type of polyphenol with anti- inflammatory and neuroprotective effects • Dark chocolate, especially with high cocoa content, which contains phenolic compounds, such as catechins and procyanidins, that can modulate the serotonin and dopamine systems and reduce oxidative stress • Green tea, which contains catechins, a type of flavonoid with antioxidant and anti-cancer effects, as well as theanine, an amino acid that can enhance mood and cognitive function
  • 41. • Tomatoes, which are a good source of lycopene, a carotenoid that can protect against prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease, as well as improve mood and reduce inflammation • Citrus fruits, such as lemons, limes, oranges and grapefruits, which are rich in vitamin C (ascorbic acid), a water-soluble antioxidant that can scavenge free radicals and regenerate other antioxidants • Spinach and other leafy green vegetables, which are high in vitamin C and carotenoids, such as beta-carotene and lutein, that can protect the eyes and the brain from oxidative damage • Broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables, such as cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and bok choy Gautam M, Agrawal M, Gautam M, Sharma P, Gautam AS, Gautam S. Role of antioxidants in generalised anxiety disorder and depression. Indian J Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;54(3):244-7. doi: 10.4103/0019-5545.102424. PMID: 23226848; PMCID: PMC3512361.
  • 42. TRYPTOPHAN AND DEPRESSION Tryptophan metabolism may play a significant role in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Modulating tryptophan metabolism with pharmacological or nutritional interventions may have potential benefits for improving mood and cognitive function in depressed patients. Shift in tryptophan metabolism may have several consequences for the brain, such as: • Reduced serotonin levels may impair mood regulation, cognitive function, sleep quality and circadian rhythm. • Increased levels of 3-HK and QUIN may cause oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation and apoptosis of neurons and glial cells. • Reduced levels of KYNA may decrease its neuroprotective effects against glutamate toxicity and inflammation. • Altered levels of PIC may affect its role in metal ion homeostasis and immune modulation. Correia AS, Vale N. Tryptophan Metabolism in Depression: A Narrative Review with a Focus on Serotonin and Kynurenine Pathways. Int J Mol Sci. 2022 Jul 31;23(15):8493. doi: 10.3390/ijms23158493. PMID: 35955633; PMCID: PMC9369076.
  • 43. 9 Foods High in Tryptophan and Why You Need It (webmd.com)
  • 44. PREBIOTICS & PROBIOTICS – DEPRESSION • Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients that stimulate the growth and activity of beneficial bacteria in the gut. Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer health benefits to the host when administered in adequate amounts. Both prebiotics and probiotics can modulate the brain-gut-microbiome axis, which is a bidirectional communication pathway between the gut microbiota and the central nervous system. • Some of the possible mechanisms of prebiotics and probiotics in depression are: • They can attenuate inflammation by downregulating proinflammatory cytokines, regulating indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity and restoring gut permeability. • They can promote the synthesis of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) either directly or indirectly by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and/or decreasing monoamine oxidase (MAO) levels. • They can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by reducing cortisol levels and enhancing negative feedback mechanisms • Chudzik A, Orzyłowska A, Rola R, Stanisz GJ. Probiotics, Prebiotics and Postbiotics on Mitigation of Depression Symptoms: Modulation of the Brain-Gut-Microbiome Axis. Biomolecules. 2021 Jul 7;11(7):1000. doi: 10.3390/biom11071000. PMID: 34356624; PMCID: PMC8301955. • Johnson D, Thurairajasingam S, Letchumanan V, Chan KG, Lee LH. Exploring the Role and Potential of Probiotics in the Field of Mental Health: Major Depressive Disorder. Nutrients. 2021 May 20;13(5):1728. doi: 10.3390/nu13051728. PMID: 34065187; PMCID: PMC8161395.
  • 46. GUT DYSBIOSIS AND ANXIETY Gut dysbiosis, characterized by an imbalance in the gut microbiota, has been associated with anxiety and anxiety-related disorders. While the exact mechanisms are still being investigated, several factors may contribute to the relationship between gut dysbiosis and anxiety: • Communication via the Gut-Brain Axis • Neurotransmitter Production • Inflammation and Immune Activation • Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis Dysregulation • Short-Chain Fatty Acids (SCFAs): The gut microbiota produces SCFAs through the fermentation of dietary fiber. SCFAs, such as butyrate, have been implicated in anxiety regulation and have anti-inflammatory effects. Dysbiosis can affect SCFA production, potentially impacting anxiety levels.
  • 47. ANXIETY AND NUTRITION Nutrition plays a significant role in supporting mental health, including anxiety management. While proper nutrition alone cannot cure anxiety disorders, adopting a balanced and nutrient-rich diet can contribute to overall well-being and potentially alleviate anxiety symptoms. Here are some ways in which nutrition can be relevant to anxiety: 1.Balanced Diet 2.Omega 3 fatty acid 3.Complex Carbohydrates 4.Magnesium 5.Vitamin B 6.Hydration Aucoin M, LaChance L, Naidoo U, Remy D, Shekdar T, Sayar N, Cardozo V, Rawana T, Chan I, Cooley K. Diet and Anxiety: A Scoping Review. Nutrients. 2021 Dec 10;13(12):4418. doi: 10.3390/nu13124418. PMID: 34959972; PMCID: PMC8706568.
  • 48. BALANCED DIET AND ANXIETY A balanced diet may help you cope with anxiety by providing your body and brain with essential nutrients and avoiding foods that may worsen your mood. Some of the dietary strategies that may ease anxiety are: • Eating a breakfast that includes some protein, such as eggs, yogurt, nuts, or cheese. Protein can help you feel fuller longer and keep your blood sugar stable. • Eating complex carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Complex carbohydrates are thought to increase the amount of serotonin in your brain, which has a calming effect. Avoid simple carbohydrates, such as sugary foods and drinks, which can cause blood sugar spikes and crashes.
  • 49. • Drinking plenty of water to stay hydrated. Even mild dehydration can affect your mood and energy levels. • Eating foods rich in magnesium, such as leafy greens, legumes, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. Magnesium may help reduce anxiety by relaxing your muscles and nerves. • Eating foods rich in folate, such as asparagus, broccoli, spinach, avocado, beans, and lentils. Folate is a B vitamin that helps your body produce neurotransmitters like serotonin and dopamine. • Nutritional strategies to ease anxiety - Harvard Health • Coping with anxiety: Can diet make a difference? - Mayo Clinic • Eating well to help manage anxiety: Your questions answered - Harvard Health
  • 50. OMEGA 3 FATTY ACID AND ANXIETY Omega-3 fatty acids may have a beneficial effect on anxiety by influencing various biological processes in your body and brain. Some of the possible mechanisms are: • Reducing inflammation – Chronic inflammation can contribute to anxiety by affecting your immune system, neurotransmitters, and hormones. Omega-3 fatty acids have anti- inflammatory properties and may help lower the levels of inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and cytokines. • Increasing brain – derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF is a protein that helps your brain cells grow, survive, and communicate. Low levels of BDNF have been linked to anxiety and depression. Omega-3 fatty acids may help increase BDNF levels and protect your brain from stress and damage. • Lowering cortisol – Cortisol is a hormone that is released in response to stress. High levels of cortisol can cause anxiety, insomnia, and mood swings. Omega-3 fatty acids may help regulate cortisol production and reduce its negative effects on your mental health Polokowski AR, Shakil H, Carmichael CL, Reigada LC. Omega-3 fatty acids and anxiety: A systematic review of the possible mechanisms at play. Nutr Neurosci. 2020 Jul;23(7):494-504. doi: 10.1080/1028415X.2018.1525092. Epub 2018 Sep 28. PMID: 30264663.
  • 51. • The best sources of omega-3 fatty acids for anxiety are those that provide high amounts of EPA and DHA, which are the types of omega-3s that have the most evidence for reducing anxiety symptoms. According to the web search results, some of the best sources of EPA and DHA are: • Fatty fish, such as mackerel, salmon, herring, sardines, and oysters. These fish provide between 0.3 and 4.6 grams of EPA and DHA per 3-ounce (oz) serving. • Algae oil supplements, which are a vegan alternative to fish oil. Algae are a direct source of EPA and DHA and can provide similar benefits as fish oil. • Some plant sources of omega-3s, such as flaxseed oil, canola oil, chia seeds, and walnuts, provide ALA, which is a precursor of EPA and DHA. However, the conversion rate of ALA to EPA and DHA is very low in humans, so these sources may not be as effective as fish or algae oil for anxiety. Su KP, Matsuoka Y, Pae CU. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Prevention of Mood and Anxiety Disorders. Clin Psychopharmacol Neurosci. 2015 Aug 31;13(2):129-37. doi: 10.9758/cpn.2015.13.2.129. PMID: 26243838; PMCID: PMC4540034.
  • 52. CARBOHYDRATE AND ANXIETY Some studies suggest that carbohydrates can help reduce anxiety by increasing the production of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that regulates mood, sleep and appetite. Serotonin is made from tryptophan, an amino acid that is more available to the brain when carbohydrates are present. • Carbohydrates may also help stabilize blood glucose levels, which can prevent mood swings and irritability caused by hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). • Moreover, the timing of carbohydrate intake may also play a role in anxiety. Some sources suggest that eating carbohydrates in the evening or before bed may help promote relaxation and sleep quality by increasing serotonin and melatonin levels.
  • 53. • The quality and quantity of carbohydrates may be important for managing anxiety. Some sources recommend choosing complex carbohydrates that are high in fiber and low in sugar, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, beans and nuts. • These foods can provide a steady source of energy and nutrients for the brain and gut, as well as support a healthy microbiome that influences mental health. • On the other hand, simple carbohydrates that are refined and processed, such as sweets, pastries, white bread and sugary drinks, should be limited or avoided as they can cause rapid fluctuations in blood glucose and serotonin levels. • Aucoin M, LaChance L, Naidoo U, Remy D, Shekdar T, Sayar N, Cardozo V, Rawana T, Chan I, Cooley K. Diet and Anxiety: A Scoping Review. Nutrients. 2021 Dec 10;13(12):4418. doi: 10.3390/nu13124418. PMID: 34959972; PMCID: PMC8706568. • Santos CJ, Ferreira AVM, Oliveira AL, Oliveira MC, Gomes JS, Aguiar DC. Carbohydrate-enriched diet predispose to anxiety and depression-like behavior after stress in mice. Nutr Neurosci. 2018 Jan;21(1):33-39. doi: 10.1080/1028415X.2016.1213529. Epub 2016 Jul 29. PMID: 27472404.
  • 54. MAGNESIUM AND ANXIETY • Some studies suggest that magnesium may help reduce anxiety by regulating neurotransmitters, which are chemical messengers that relay signals between nerve cells in the brain and body. Magnesium may also affect the hypothalamus, a part of the brain that controls the pituitary and adrenal glands, which are involved in the stress response. Magnesium may also modulate the activity of the HPA axis, a system that regulates the body’s reaction to stress and anxiety. • However, other studies indicate that magnesium deficiency may worsen anxiety by impairing brain function and increasing inflammation and oxidative stress. These factors can damage brain cells and contribute to anxiety and depression. Additionally, some people may experience symptoms of anxiety when they have low levels of magnesium, such as irritability, nervousness, insomnia and muscle spasms • Lakhan SE, Vieira KF. Nutritional and herbal supplements for anxiety and anxiety-related disorders: systematic review. Nutr J. 2010 Oct 7;9:42. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-9-42. PMID: 20929532; PMCID: PMC2959081. • Boyle NB, et. al. (2017). The effects of magnesium supplementation on subjective anxiety and stress – A systematic review. DOI: 10.3390/nu9050429
  • 55.
  • 56. VITAMIN B AND ANXIETY Some studies suggest that vitamin B may help reduce anxiety by regulating neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, which are involved in mood, motivation and stress response. Vitamin B may also modulate the activity of the HPA axis, a system that regulates the body’s reaction to stress and anxiety. Some foods that are rich in vitamin B include dairy, nuts, seeds, beans, whole grains and leafy greens. Field, D. T., Cracknell, R. O., Eastwood, J. R., Scarfe, P., Williams, C. M., Zheng, Y., & Tavassoli, T. (2022). High-dose Vitamin B6 supplementation reduces anxiety and strengthens visual surround suppression. Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental, 37(6), e2852. https://doi.org/10.1002/hup.2852
  • 57. GUT DYSBIOSIS AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER ASD is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social communication challenges, repetitive behaviors, and restricted interests. • Gut Microbiota Composition: Studies have found differences in the gut microbiota composition of individuals with ASD compared to typically developing individuals. These differences include alterations in the diversity and abundance of specific bacterial species. • Gastrointestinal Symptoms: Many individuals with ASD also experience gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, such as constipation, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and bloating. It has been suggested that gut dysbiosis may contribute to the development of these GI symptoms in individuals with ASD.
  • 58. Gut-Brain Axis: The gut microbiota communicates bidirectionally with the brain through the gut-brain axis, involving neural, hormonal, and immunological pathways. Imbalances in the gut microbiota can potentially impact brain function and behaviors, including those associated with ASD. Metabolites and Inflammation: Dysbiosis can result in alterations in microbial metabolites produced in the gut, such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and neurotransmitter-like molecules. These metabolites can influence neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and neurotransmitter systems, which may play a role in the development and progression of ASD. Fattorusso, A., Di Genova, L., Dell'Isola, G. B., Mencaroni, E., & Esposito, S. (2019). Autism Spectrum Disorders and the Gut Microbiota. Nutrients, 11(3), 521. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030521
  • 59. ASD AND NUTRITION Nutrition plays an important role in supporting the overall health and well-being of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). While nutrition alone cannot cure or treat ASD, a balanced diet can help provide essential nutrients, support optimal brain function, address specific nutritional needs, and potentially improve certain symptoms associated with ASD • fiber-rich foods like whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables • prebiotics, and probiotics • Fruits and Vegetables such as berries, leafy greens, bell peppers, carrots, and sweet potatoes. • Whole grain options such as whole wheat bread, brown rice, quinoa, oats, and whole grain pasta. • healthy fats, such as avocados, nuts (e.g., almonds, walnuts), seeds (e.g., chia seeds, flaxseeds), and olive oil. • Omega-3 Rich Foods: Include fatty fish (such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines), walnuts, flaxseeds, and chia seeds to provide omega-3 fatty acids Doreswamy, S., Bashir, A., Guarecuco, J. E., Lahori, S., Baig, A., Narra, L. R., Patel, P., & Heindl, S. E. (2020). Effects of Diet, Nutrition, and Exercise in Children With Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Literature Review. Cureus, 12(12), e12222. https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.12222
  • 60. GUT DYSBIOSIS AND SCHIZOPHRENIA A chronic mental disorder characterized by distorted thinking, delusions, hallucinations, and impaired social functioning. While the exact mechanisms are still being investigated, some theories are as follow : Altered Gut Microbiota Composition Studies have found differences in the gut microbiota composition of individuals with schizophrenia compared to healthy individuals. These differences include changes in the diversity and abundance of specific bacterial species. Immune Dysregulation and Inflammation Gut dysbiosis can trigger immune dysregulation and low-grade inflammation, which may contribute to the development and progression of schizophrenia. Inflammatory markers have been found to be elevated in individuals with schizophrenia.
  • 61. Neurotransmitter Alterations The gut microbiota can influence the production and metabolism of neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and serotonin, which are known to be involved in schizophrenia. Imbalances in the gut microbiota can potentially affect neurotransmitter levels and signaling pathways in the brain. Gut-Brain Axis Dysfunction The gut microbiota communicates bidirectionally with the brain through the gut- brain axis. Disruptions in the gut microbiota can potentially lead to alterations in the signaling between the gut and the brain, impacting brain function and behaviors associated with schizophrenia. Antipsychotic Medication Effects It's important to note that antipsychotic medications commonly used to treat schizophrenia can themselves impact the gut microbiota composition. This adds complexity to the relationship between gut dysbiosis and schizophrenia, as medication effects need to be considered Munawar, N., Ahsan, K., Muhammad, K., Ahmad, A., Anwar, M. A., Shah, I., Al Ameri, A. K., & Al Mughairbi, F. (2021). Hidden Role of Gut Microbiome Dysbiosis in Schizophrenia: Antipsychotics or Psychobiotics as Therapeutics?. International journal of molecular sciences, 22(14), 7671. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22147671
  • 62. When it comes to schizophrenia, it is important to focus on a balanced and nutritious diet that supports overall health and well- being. While specific food items may not directly treat or cure schizophrenia, a healthy diet can contribute to overall physical and mental well-being. • Fruits and Vegetables such as berries, leafy greens, bell peppers, carrots, and broccoli. • Whole grain options such as whole wheat bread, brown rice, quinoa, oats, and whole grain pasta. • Healthy fats, such as avocados, nuts (e.g., almonds, walnuts), seeds (e.g., chia seeds, flaxseeds), and olive oil • Omega-3 fatty acids, such as fatty fish (e.g., salmon, mackerel, sardines), walnuts, flaxseeds, and chia seeds. • Antioxidants, such as berries, dark chocolate, green tea, and colorful vegetables • Hydration Amani, R. (2007). Is dietary pattern of schizophrenia patients different from healthy subjects?. BMC Psychiatry. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-7-15. SCHIZOPHRENIA AND NUTRITION
  • 63. EMOTIONAL HEALING Emotional healing refers to the process of addressing and resolving emotional wounds, trauma, and negative experiences in order to promote healing, growth, and well-being. It involves understanding, processing, and integrating emotions in a healthy and constructive way.
  • 64. EMOTIONS AND HORMONES Several hormones play a role in regulating and influencing emotions. The mechanism of hormones and emotions is a complex and intricate process involving multiple systems within the body. • Hormone Production: Hormones are chemical messengers produced by various glands and tissues in the body. They are released into the bloodstream and travel to target cells or organs, where they exert their effects. • Receptor Activation: Hormones bind to specific receptors on target cells, initiating a series of biochemical reactions within the cell. These reactions can impact gene expression, protein synthesis, and cellular signaling pathways.
  • 65. • Neurotransmitter Regulation: Hormones can influence the production, release, and activity of neurotransmitters in the brain. Neurotransmitters are chemicals involved in communication between brain cells and play a crucial role in regulating mood, emotions, and behavior. • Brain-Body Communication: The brain and the body have a bidirectional communication network. Hormones can communicate with the brain through various pathways, including the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The brain can also send signals to the body, triggering the release of hormones in response to emotional experiences and stress. BRACELAND F. J. (1953). Hormones and their influence on the emotions. Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 29(10), 765–777.
  • 66. • Emotional Regulation: Hormones can influence emotional regulation and mood through their interactions with specific brain regions and circuits. For example, serotonin, dopamine, and oxytocin are neurotransmitters that play a role in regulating mood and emotions, and their levels and activity are influenced by hormonal signals. •Stress Response: Hormones, particularly cortisol and adrenaline, are involved in the body's response to stress. In situations perceived as threatening, these hormones are released, activating the body's "fight-or-flight" response. Chronic or excessive stress can dysregulate the stress response system and contribute to emotional disturbances.​ •Feedback Mechanisms: Hormone levels are tightly regulated through feedback mechanisms. For instance, when hormone levels reach a certain threshold, feedback signals from target cells or the brain can inhibit further hormone production or release.​
  • 67. HORMONES AND NUTRITION • Serotonin • Dopamine • Cortisol • Adrenaline (Epinephrine) • Estrogen • Testosterone
  • 68. SEROTONIN AND NUTRITION Serotonin itself cannot be obtained directly from food because it is a neurotransmitter produced within the body. However, there are certain foods that can indirectly support serotonin production or provide the building blocks necessary for its synthesis. • Tryptophan-Rich Foods: Tryptophan is an essential amino acid that serves as a precursor for serotonin synthesis. Foods rich in tryptophan include: • Dairy products (milk, cheese, yogurt) • Nuts and seeds (almonds, walnuts, sunflower seeds) • Legumes (lentils, chickpeas, soybeans) • Complex Carbohydrates: opt for complex carbohydrates that provide sustained energy, such as: • Whole grains (oats, brown rice, quinoa) • Fruits (bananas, apples, berries) • Vegetables (sweet potatoes, leafy greens)
  • 69. • Omega-3 Fatty Acid-Rich Foods: Omega- 3 fatty acids have been associated with increased serotonin levels. • Flaxseeds • Chia seeds • Walnuts • B Vitamin-Rich Foods: Certain B vitamins, such as vitamin B6, are involved in serotonin synthesis. • Bananas • Nuts and seeds • Whole grains
  • 70. • Fermented Foods: The gut microbiota has been linked to serotonin production and regulation. Consuming fermented foods can support a healthy gut microbiota. • Yogurt (preferably plain and unsweetened) • Kefir • Sauerkraut • Kimchi • Mohajeri MH, Wittwer J, Vargas K, Hogan E, Holmes A, Rogers PJ, Goralczyk R, Gibson EL. Chronic treatment with a tryptophan-rich protein hydrolysate improves emotional processing, mental energy levels and reaction time in middle-aged women. Br J Nutr. 2015 Jan 28;113(2):350- 65. doi: 10.1017/S0007114514003754. Epub 2015 Jan 9. PMID: 25572038. • Jenkins, T. A., Nguyen, J. C., Polglaze, K. E., & Bertrand, P. P. (2016). Influence of Tryptophan and Serotonin on Mood and Cognition with a Possible Role of the Gut-Brain Axis. Nutrients, 8(1), 56. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu8010056
  • 71. DOPAMINE AND NUTRITION Dopamine is a neurotransmitter associated with pleasure, motivation, and reward. While there are no specific foods that directly increase dopamine levels, certain nutrients and dietary factors can support healthy dopamine function. • Protein-Rich Foods: Consuming foods that are high in protein provides the building blocks for dopamine production. • Eggs • Dairy products (milk, cheese, yogurt) • Legumes (lentils, chickpeas, beans) • Tyrosine-Rich Foods: Tyrosine is an amino acid that is involved in dopamine synthesis. • Almonds • Avocados • Bananas • Pumpkin seeds • Sesame seeds
  • 72. • L-DOPA-Rich Foods: L-DOPA is a precursor to dopamine. Include foods that contain L- DOPA or its precursor, such as: • Mucuna pruriens (a tropical legume also known as velvet bean) • Fava beans • Green Leafy Vegetables: Green leafy vegetables are rich in folate and other nutrients that support healthy dopamine function. Include vegetables such as: • Spinach • Kale • Broccoli • Cilia R, Laguna J, Cassani E, Cereda E, Pozzi NG, Isaias IU, Contin M, Barichella M, Pezzoli G. Mucuna pruriens in Parkinson disease: A double-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover study. Neurology. 2017 Aug 1;89(5):432-438. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000004175. Epub 2017 Jul 5. PMID: 28679598; PMCID: PMC5539737. • Mehran S M, M., & B, G. (2013). Simultaneous determination of levodopa and carbidopa from fava bean, green peas and green beans by high performance liquid gas chromatography. Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR, 7(6), 1004–1007. https://doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2013/5415.3072
  • 73. • Antioxidant-Rich Foods: Antioxidants protect the brain from oxidative stress, which can affect dopamine function. • Dark chocolate • Green tea • Berries (blueberries, strawberries, raspberries) • Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty acids can support brain health and neurotransmitter function. • Walnuts • Flaxseeds • Chia seeds This Photo by Unknown author is licensed under CC BY-NC. • Kühn S, Düzel S, Colzato L, Norman K, Gallinat J, Brandmaier AM, Lindenberger U, Widaman KF. Food for thought: association between dietary tyrosine and cognitive performance in younger and older adults. Psychol Res. 2019 Sep;83(6):1097-1106. doi: 10.1007/s00426-017-0957-4. Epub 2017 Dec 18. PMID: 29255945; PMCID: PMC6647184. • Geiger BM, Haburcak M, Avena NM, Moyer MC, Hoebel BG, Pothos EN. Deficits of mesolimbic dopamine neurotransmission in rat dietary obesity. Neuroscience. 2009 Apr 10;159(4):1193-9. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2009.02.007. Epub 2009 Feb 11. PMID: 19409204; PMCID: PMC2677693. • González-Arancibia C, Urrutia-Piñones J, Illanes-González J, Martinez-Pinto J, Sotomayor-Zárate R, Julio-Pieper M, Bravo JA. Do your gut microbes affect your brain dopamine? Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2019 May;236(5):1611-1622. doi: 10.1007/s00213-019-05265-5. Epub 2019 May 17. PMID: 31098656.
  • 74. CORTISOL AND NUTRITION Cortisol is a stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands. It is involved in the body's response to stress and helps regulate blood pressure, blood sugar levels, and immune responses. Chronically high levels of cortisol due to chronic stress can contribute to anxiety and mood disorders. While it's generally not advisable to intentionally increase cortisol levels, as chronically elevated cortisol levels can be detrimental to health, there are certain dietary practices that can help support healthy cortisol regulation.
  • 75. Balanced Macronutrient Intake: Ensure that you're consuming a balanced diet that includes an appropriate ratio of macronutrients—carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Avoid extreme low-carbohydrate diets, as they may lead to increased cortisol production. Adequate Caloric Intake: Caloric restriction and severe energy deficits can elevate cortisol levels. Ensure you're consuming enough calories to meet your body's energy needs. Whole Foods and Balanced Meals: Focus on consuming whole, nutrient- dense foods. Include a variety of fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, whole grains, and healthy fats in your meals.
  • 76. •Hirotsu C, Tufik S, Andersen ML. Interactions between sleep, stress, and metabolism: From physiological to pathological conditions. Sleep Sci. 2015 Nov;8(3):143-52. doi: 10.1016/j.slsci.2015.09.002. Epub 2015 Sep 28. PMID: 26779321; PMCID: PMC4688585.​ •Chen C, Nakagawa S, An Y, Ito K, Kitaichi Y, Kusumi I. The exercise-glucocorticoid paradox: How exercise is beneficial to cognition, mood, and the brain while increasing glucocorticoid levels. Front Neuroendocrinol. 2017 Jan;44:83-102. doi: 10.1016/j.yfrne.2016.12.001. Epub 2016 Dec 9. PMID: 27956050.​ •Hofmann, S. G., & Gómez, A. F. (2017). Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Anxiety and Depression. The Psychiatric clinics of North America, 40(4), 739–749. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2017.08.008 •Iranmanesh A, Lawson D, Dunn B, Veldhuis JD. Glucose ingestion selectively amplifies ACTH and cortisol secretory-burst mass and enhances their joint synchrony in healthy men. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Sep;96(9):2882-8. doi: 10.1210/jc.2011-0682. Epub 2011 Jul 13. PMID: 21752898; PMCID: PMC3167666.​ •Gyllenhammer LE, Weigensberg MJ, Spruijt-Metz D, Allayee H, Goran MI, Davis JN. Modifying influence of dietary sugar in the relationship between cortisol and visceral adipose tissue in minority youth. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 Feb;22(2):474-81. doi: 10.1002/oby.20594. Epub 2013 Sep 20. PMID: 23929660; PMCID: PMC3946447.​ Regular Meal Times: Maintain regular meal times and avoid prolonged periods of fasting or skipping meals. Erratic eating patterns and extreme fasting can increase cortisol production. Moderate Caffeine Intake: Caffeine can temporarily increase cortisol levels. Limit your intake of caffeinated beverages like coffee, tea, and energy drinks. Be aware of how caffeine affects your individual response and consider reducing or avoiding it if you're particularly sensitive. Adequate Hydration: Dehydration can contribute to increased cortisol levels. Ensure you're drinking enough water throughout the day to stay properly hydrated.
  • 77. ADRENALINE AND NUTRITION The adrenal hormones help regulate several bodily functions including metabolism, blood pressure and your body's response to stress. When it comes to supporting adrenal health, it's important to focus on a well-balanced diet that provides essential nutrients and supports overall well-being • Nutrient-Dense Foods: Consume a variety of whole, nutrient-dense foods that provide essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. This includes fresh fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, whole grains, nuts, and seeds. • Vitamin C-Rich Foods: Vitamin C is important for adrenal function and can help support the production of adrenal hormones. Include foods such as citrus fruits, berries, kiwi, bell peppers, broccoli, and leafy greens.
  • 78. • B Vitamin-Rich Foods: B vitamins, including B5 (pantothenic acid) and B6 (pyridoxine), are essential for adrenal health. Good dietary sources of B vitamins include whole grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, poultry, fish, and leafy green vegetables. • Magnesium-Rich Foods: Magnesium plays a role in stress response and adrenal function. Include magnesium-rich foods such as leafy greens, nuts, seeds, legumes, and whole grains.
  • 79. • Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and can support overall health. Include foods rich in omega-3s, such as fatty fish (salmon, mackerel, sardines), walnuts, flaxseeds, and chia seeds. • Healthy Fats: Include sources of healthy fats in your diet, such as avocados, olive oil, coconut oil, and nuts. These fats provide sustained energy and support hormone production. https://www.healthline.com/health/adrenal- fatigue-diet#foods-to-eat
  • 80. ESTROGEN AND NUTRITION Estrogen has been associated with positive mood and emotional well-being, while fluctuations in estrogen levels during the menstrual cycle or hormonal changes can contribute to premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or mood swings. Mood swings are another effect of low estrogen. One may feel sad, anxious, or frustrated. Shifting hormone levels and night sweats may disrupt your sleep. This can cause fatigue, which may make mood swings worse. While estrogen levels are primarily regulated by the body's hormonal system, certain foods contain phytoestrogens, which are plant compounds that can mimic or interact with estrogen in the body.
  • 81. •Soy Products: Soybeans and soy products, such as tofu, tempeh, and edamame, are rich in phytoestrogens called isoflavones. • Flaxseeds: Flaxseeds are a good source of lignans, which are phytoestrogens. Ground flaxseeds are easier to digest and provide better absorption of lignans. • Sesame Seeds: Sesame seeds and sesame products, such as tahini, contain lignans that have weak estrogenic activity. • https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/dietary-factors/phytochemicals/soy-isoflavones#food-sources • De Silva, S. F., & Alcorn, J. (2019). Flaxseed Lignans as Important Dietary Polyphenols for Cancer Prevention and Treatment: Chemistry, Pharmacokinetics, and Molecular Targets. Pharmaceuticals (Basel, Switzerland), 12(2), 68. https://doi.org/10.3390/ph12020068 • Wu WH, Kang YP, Wang NH, Jou HJ, Wang TA. Sesame ingestion affects sex hormones, antioxidant status, and blood lipids in postmenopausal women. J Nutr. 2006 May;136(5):1270-5. doi: 10.1093/jn/136.5.1270. PMID: 16614415.
  • 82. • Legumes: Certain legumes, including chickpeas, lentils, and red clover, contain phytoestrogens like isoflavones and coumestans. • Whole Grains: Whole grains like oats, barley, and wheat germ contain lignans that have mild estrogenic properties. • Fruits and Vegetables: Some fruits and vegetables, such as apples, cherries, carrots, and yams, contain compounds with weak estrogenic effects. • Rodríguez-García, C., Sánchez-Quesada, C., Toledo, E., Delgado-Rodríguez, M., & Gaforio, J. J. (2019). Naturally Lignan-Rich Foods: A Dietary Tool for Health Promotion?. Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), 24(5), 917. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24050917 • Yang J, Wu Q, Chen H, Zhuang Y. Influence of micronization on improving phytoestrogenic effects of wheat bran. J Am Coll Nutr. 2015;34(3):224-7. doi: 10.1080/07315724.2014.912166. Epub 2015 Mar 11. PMID: 25757396.
  • 83. TESTOSTERONE AND NUTRITION Testosterone is primarily produced by the testes in males and to a lesser extent by the ovaries and adrenal glands in females. While specific foods may not directly increase testosterone levels, maintaining a healthy and balanced diet is important for overall hormonal balance and well-being. • healthy fats, such as avocados, nuts (like almonds and walnuts), seeds (like flaxseeds and chia seeds), fatty fish (like salmon and mackerel), and olive oil.
  • 84. • Zinc-Rich Foods: Zinc is essential for testosterone production. Include foods like oysters, lean meats (beef, poultry), shellfish, legumes (chickpeas, lentils), nuts, and seeds (pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds) that are rich in zinc. • Vitamin D: Adequate vitamin D levels are associated with healthy testosterone levels. Get regular sun exposure or consider incorporating vitamin D-rich foods into your diet, such as fatty fish, fortified dairy products, and egg yolks. If needed, consult a healthcare professional for vitamin D supplementation.
  • 85. • Protein-Rich Foods: Consuming adequate protein is important for overall hormone production. Include lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, legumes, and plant-based protein sources like tofu and tempeh. • Cruciferous Vegetables: Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, and cabbage, contain a compound called indole-3-carbinol, which may help support healthy testosterone metabolism. • Tremellen K, McPhee N, Pearce K, Benson S, Schedlowski M, Engler H. Endotoxin-initiated inflammation reduces testosterone production in men of reproductive age. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2018 Mar 1;314(3):E206-E213. doi: 10.1152/ajpendo.00279.2017. Epub 2017 Nov 28. PMID: 29183872; PMCID: PMC5899218. • Pizzorno L. (2015). Nothing Boring About Boron. Integrative medicine (Encinitas, Calif.), 14(4), 35–48. • Ammar, A., MounaTurki, Trabelsi, K., Bragazzi, N. L., Boukhris, O., Bouaziz, M., Ayadi, F., El Abed, K., Driss, T., Souissi, N., Chtourou, H., Bailey, S. J., & Hoekelmann, A. (2020). Effects of natural polyphenol-rich pomegranate juice on the acute and delayed response of Homocysteine and steroidal hormones following weightlifting exercises: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 17(1), 15. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-020-00345-w
  • 86. SPIRITUAL HEALING This plane relates to the realm of spirituality, consciousness, and transcendence. It encompasses the search for meaning, purpose, and connection to a higher power or universal consciousness. It involves aspects such as self-awareness, personal growth, and the exploration of metaphysical or transcendent experiences. Spiritual healing refers to the process of addressing and nurturing the spiritual aspect of a person's being in order to promote overall well- being and harmony. Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS. https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276. Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Riyadh. J Relig Health. 2020 Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943-018-0677-0. PMID: 30066265.
  • 87. SPIRITUAL HEALING AND NUTRITION When it comes to food for spiritual healing, the focus is often on nourishing the body and supporting overall well-being, as the physical and spiritual aspects are interconnected. While specific food choices may vary based on individual preferences and beliefs, There are some general principles to consider:
  • 88. 1. Whole and Plant-Based Foods Emphasize whole, unprocessed foods, particularly plant-based options such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. These foods are often considered more vibrant and energetically connected to nature, which can support spiritual well- being. Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS. https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276. Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Riyadh. J Relig Health. 2020 Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943-018-0677-0. PMID: 30066265.
  • 89. 2. Mindful Eating Practice mindful eating by being present and fully engaged with your meals. Slow down, savor the flavors, and appreciate the nourishment provided by your food. Cultivate gratitude for the nourishment and energy it provides. Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS. https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276. Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Riyadh. J Relig Health. 2020 Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943-018- 0677-0. PMID: 30066265.
  • 90. 3. Pure and Clean Foods Aim for foods that are as close to their natural state as possible, free from artificial additives, preservatives, and chemicals. This includes choosing organic produce and minimally processed ingredients to promote a cleaner and purer energy in the body. Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS. https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276. Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Riyadh. J Relig Health. 2020 Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943- 018-0677-0. PMID: 30066265.
  • 91. 4. Water and Hydration Water is essential for overall well- being, including spiritual health. Stay hydrated by consuming adequate amounts of clean, purified water. Some spiritual practices may involve blessing or infusing water with positive intentions or using it for cleansing rituals. Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS. https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276. Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Riyadh. J Relig Health. 2020 Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943-018-0677-0. PMID: 30066265.
  • 92. 5. Fasting or Cleansing Some spiritual traditions incorporate fasting or cleansing practices as a way to purify the body and deepen spiritual connection. These practices involve temporary restriction or elimination of certain foods or beverages for a designated period. If considering fasting or cleansing, it's important to do so under proper guidance and ensure it is suitable for your individual health needs. Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS. https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276.
  • 93. NUTRITIONAL HERBS FOR SPIRITUAL PURPOSE 1. Lavender 2. Holy Basil (Tulsi) 3. Sage 4. Rosemary 5. Chamomile
  • 94. Lavendar • Scientific name: Lavandula • Family: Lamiaceae • English: lavendar • Lavender is a versatile herb that is widely recognized for its pleasant fragrance and numerous beneficial properties. It has been used for centuries in various cultures for its calming and soothing effects. Here are some key aspects of lavender: • Lavender is known for its calming properties and is often used to promote relaxation, relieve anxiety, and enhance sleep. It can be used in the form of essential oil, herbal tea, or as a dried herb in sachets or incense. • Lavender tea is often used for spiritual purposes due to its calming and soothing properties. It can be consumed as a warm beverage to support relaxation, meditation, and overall well-being.
  • 95. HOLY BASIL (TULSI) • Scientific name: Ocimum tenuiflorum • Family: Lamiaceae • English: Basil • Holy Basil is considered a sacred herb in many spiritual traditions. It is believed to have adaptogenic properties that help reduce stress, promote mental clarity, and support overall well-being. Holy Basil can be consumed as a tea or taken as a supplement. • Holy Basil is believed to have purifying properties that help cleanse negative energies and promote spiritual purity. Before engaging in spiritual rituals or practices, you can drink Holy Basil tea with the intention of purifying your mind, body, and spirit.
  • 96. • Holy Basil tea is known to promote mental clarity and focus, which can be beneficial for meditation. Drinking Holy Basil tea before or during your meditation practice can help calm the mind, deepen your focus, and enhance your ability to connect with your inner self or the divine. • Holy Basil is associated with promoting a connection to higher consciousness or spiritual realms. By sipping Holy Basil tea with reverence and intention, you can invite a deeper sense of connection, awareness, and spiritual insights. • Kamijo, Y., & Miyamura, T. (2019). Spirituality and associated factors among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.. Japan journal of nursing science : JJNS. https://doi.org/10.1111/jjns.12276. • Qureshi NA, Khalil AA, Alsanad SM. Spiritual and Religious Healing Practices: Some Reflections from Saudi National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Riyadh. J Relig Health. 2020 Apr;59(2):845-869. doi: 10.1007/s10943-018-0677-0. PMID: 30066265.
  • 97. SAGE Scientific name: Salvia officinalis Family: Lamiaceae English: Sage Sage has long been used in spiritual rituals and ceremonies for its purifying and cleansing properties. Burning dried sage bundles, also known as smudging, is believed to clear negative energies and create a sacred space for spiritual practices. Sage tea has a long history of spiritual and medicinal use in various cultures. It is commonly associated with purification, protection, and wisdom. Sage has been traditionally used for smudging rituals to cleanse and purify a space or person energetically. Similarly, drinking sage tea can be seen as an internal cleansing practice, helping to clear negative energies or stagnant emotions. Sage tea can aid in grounding and centering oneself. It can help create a sense of stability and focus, allowing for a more grounded presence during spiritual practices or daily life
  • 98. ROSEMARY • Scientific name: Salvia rosmarinus • Family: Lamiaceae • English: Rosemary • Rosemary is often associated with memory, clarity, and mental focus. It can be used as an aromatic herb to enhance meditation or consumed as a tea for its uplifting and stimulating effects. • Rosemary is often associated with mental clarity and enhancing focus. Drinking rosemary tea with the intention of sharpening your mind and improving concentration can support your spiritual practices, such as meditation or studying sacred texts. • Rosemary has long been used for its protective and purifying properties. Drinking rosemary tea can be a symbolic act of purifying your energy, releasing negative influences, and inviting a sense of protection during spiritual practices. • Rosemary is known for its invigorating and uplifting effects. Drinking rosemary tea can help revitalize your energy and uplift your mood, creating a positive state of mind for spiritual exploration and growth
  • 99. CHAMOMILE Scientific Name: Matricaria recutita Family: Asteraceae English: Chamomile Chamomile is known for its calming and soothing properties. It can help promote relaxation, reduce anxiety, and support restful sleep. Chamomile tea is a popular way to enjoy its benefits. Chamomile tea is well-known for its calming effects on the nervous system. By promoting relaxation and reducing anxiety, chamomile tea can create a conducive environment for spiritual practices such as meditation, prayer, or reflection. Chamomile tea is believed to have properties that aid in emotional healing and stress relief. By sipping chamomile tea mindfully, you can create a safe space to process and release emotions, allowing for spiritual growth and self-reflection. Chamomile is known for its association with promoting restful sleep and vivid dreams. Drinking chamomile tea before bedtime may enhance dream recall and facilitate intuitive insights during dreamwork or meditation.
  • 100. YOGA AND SPIRITUAL HEALING Yoga can indeed be a powerful tool for spiritual healing. While physical asanas (postures) are a popular aspect of yoga, the practice extends beyond the physical body and encompasses mental, emotional, and spiritual well- being by the practice of meditation breathwork and mindful eating.
  • 101. ‘Jaisa anna, waisa manna’ – We are what we eat. A very simple saying, yet we fail understand it. Food (Aahar) is one of the most parts of our life that helps keep hale, and hearty. However, eating the right right moderation is very
  • 102. SATVIK DIET • A satvik diet is a type of vegetarian diet that follows the principles of Ayurveda, a traditional system of medicine from India. It is based on the concept of sattva, which means purity, balance and harmony. Sattvic foods are believed to promote health, happiness, calmness and mental clarity. • A satvik diet consists mainly of fresh fruits, vegetables, sprouted whole grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, dairy products and herbal teas. It avoids foods that are stale, processed, fried, spicy, sour or stimulating, such as meat, fish, eggs, onion, garlic, coffee, alcohol and white sugar. • Some of the benefits of a satvik diet may include lower risks of heart disease, cancer and diabetes due to its high intake of fiber, antioxidants and phytochemicals. It may also support mental health and well-being by reducing stress and enhancing clarity.
  • 103. • Fruits: All fresh, ripe and sweet fruits are sattvic, such as apples, bananas, berries, grapes, mangoes, melons, oranges, peaches, pears and plums. • Vegetables: Most fresh, organic and lightly cooked vegetables are sattvic, such as asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumber, green beans, lettuce, peas, potatoes, spinach and squash. • Grains: Sprouted whole grains are the most sattvic form of grains, such as buckwheat, barley, corn, millet, oats, quinoa, rice and wheat. They can be cooked or eaten raw. Bread and pasta made from whole grains are also sattvic if they are fresh and without preservatives.
  • 104. • Legumes: Immature or sprouted legumes and peanuts are sattvic, such as fresh edamame, green peas, green beans and mung beans. Mature legumes such as beans, lentils and chickpeas are also sattvic if they are well cooked and seasoned with spices. Soy products such as tofu and tempeh are also sattvic if they are organic. • Nuts and seeds: All nuts and seeds that are raw or lightly roasted are sattvic, such as almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, pistachios, walnuts, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds and flax seeds. They can be eaten whole or made into nut butters or milks. They should be consumed in moderation as they are high in fat and calories. • Dairy products: Dairy products that come from cows that are fed and milked appropriately are sattvic, such as milk, yogurt, cheese (especially
  • 105. • Sweeteners: Natural sweeteners such as honey (raw), maple syrup (pure), jaggery (unrefined cane sugar) and dates (fresh) are sattvic. They should be used sparingly as they are still high in sugar. • Herbal teas: Herbal teas that are caffeine-free and made from fresh or dried herbs are sattvic. Some examples are chamomile tea (calming), ginger tea (warming), mint tea (cooling) and tulsi tea (holy basil). They can be sweetened with a little honey or maple syrup if desired.. • Spices: Spices that are mild and aromatic are sattvic. They help to enhance the flavor and digestibility of food. Some examples are cardamom (sweet), cinnamon (sweet), coriander (cooling), cumin (warming), fennel
  • 106. A person with satvik prakriti has the following characteristics: • They are pure, balanced, harmonious, peaceful and virtuous. • They have a clear and sharp mind, a calm and compassionate heart, and a strong and healthy body. • They are intelligent, creative, wise, generous, humble and truthful. • They seek knowledge, self-realization and liberation from suffering. • They are devoted to their spiritual practice and follow ethical principles. • They are attracted to sattvic foods, such as fresh fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, dairy products and herbal teas. • They avoid rajasic and tamasic foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, onion, garlic, coffee, alcohol and white sugar. • They have a balanced lifestyle that includes regular exercise, meditation, yoga and rest. https://www.hinduwebsite.com/gunas.asp https://www.arhantayoga.org/blog/sattva-rajas-tamas-gunas/
  • 107. RAJSIK DIET A rajsik diet is a type of diet that follows the principles of rajas guna, one of the three qualities of nature (prakriti). A rajsik diet consists mainly of foods that are spicy, hot, stimulating, sour, bitter, dry or salty. It includes foods that are fried, processed, refined, preserved or fermented. It also includes foods that are animal products, stimulants or intoxicants. A rajsik diet has the following effects on the body, mind and emotions: • It increases energy, activity, passion, ambition and competitiveness. • It stimulates the nervous system, the senses and the intellect. • It creates restlessness, agitation, anxiety, stress and anger. • It disturbs the balance and harmony of the body and mind. • It binds one to the fruits of their actions and desires. https://wholesomeayurveda.com/2017/10/21/sattvic-rajasic-tamasic-ayurveda-food-mind-body/
  • 108. • Fried, processed, refined or fermented foods: Such as chips, nuggets, burgers, pizza, cheese, pickles, ketchup, vinegar etc. • Sour or bitter fruits and vegetables: Such as grapefruit, lemon, lime, cherry, raspberry, kiwi etc. • Old or stale foods: Such as leftovers, canned foods, frozen •Meat and fish: Such as salmon, sole, trout, lamb, chicken, turkey, tuna, eggs etc. •Excess of sharp spices: Salt, pepper, black pepper, ginger, onion, garlic, radish etc. •Stimulants: Coffee, tea, sugar, cola drinks, chocolates, alcoholic drinks etc.
  • 109. Rajasik prakriti is characterized by qualities such as anger, euphoria, anxiety, fear, irritation, worry, restlessness, stress, courage, rumination, determination, chaos. People with rajasik prakriti are often ambitious, energetic, competitive, and adventurous. They are also prone to emotional fluctuations, impulsiveness, and aggression. Rajasik prakriti is influenced by the element of fire and the dosha of pitta. https://www.yogabasics.com/learn/the-3-gunas-of-nature/
  • 110. TAMSIK DIET A tamsik diet is a type of diet that consists of foods that are dark, dull, stale, spoiled, overcooked, fermented, or processed. These foods are said to increase the quality of tamas in the mind and body, which is associated with ignorance, inertia, laziness, attachment, depression, confusion, and grief. A tamsik diet is considered harmful for one’s physical and mental health, as it lowers the vitality and clarity of the person.
  • 111. • Food and diet like: excess protein, flesh, egg, soybean, white flour, fried fast food • Stimulating diet: spicy and fried food, alcohol, chillies, sauce, black pepper, cinnamon, tea • Acidic diet: preserved fruits, jam, jelly, flavoured drinks, preserved food, soups, fermented bread • Mucus forming diet: milk and milk products1 • Fish and meat: such as salmon, sole, trout, lamb, chicken, turkey, tuna, etc. • Any canned food: fruits, beans, vegetables that are sweetened or salted. Also bottled fruit juices and fermented foods https://wholesomeayurveda.com/2017/10/21/sattvic-rajasic-tamasic-ayurveda-food-mind-body/
  • 112. Tamsik prakriti is one of the three types of psychological constitution according to Ayurveda and Yoga. It is derived from the Sanskrit word tamas, which means darkness, dullness, or inertia. Tamsik prakriti is characterized by qualities such as ignorance, attachment, laziness, depression, confusion, and grief. People with tamsik prakriti are often dull, ignorant, passive, and attached to material things. They are also prone to mental and physical diseases, as they lack vitality and clarity. Tamsik prakriti is influenced by the element of earth and the dosha of kapha.
  • 113. MITAHARA chapter 1 verse 58 (Susnighdha – madhurāhāraśchaturthāmśa – vivarjitah l Bhujyate śiva – samprītyai mitāhārah sa uchyate ll) • Susnighdha – madhura- the food which is fresh, its juices are intact, has pleasant taste and is not dried up • chaturthāmśa – vivarjitah- keep the stomach ¼ empty • Bhujyate śiva – samprītyai- eat as an offering to please god shiva
  • 114. A yogi’s dirt should be simple and bland. Anything that is highly concentrated, causes acidity in the stomach and overheats the system should be avoided, i.e., greasy, spicy and stale food. Food which create toxins and putrefy in the intestine, such as meat should be avoided. Garlic and asafetida are aphrodisiac in nature and thus should be avoided.
  • 115. When food is cooked and again reheated after it has gone cold, bacteria have set in, and if this is eaten it creates fermentation in the stomach, resulting in indigestion, wind and acidity. Dry food means that which has no natural oil or water left in it. Oil is necessary in minimum quantities. Excess salt and acidity imbalance the system, in fact salt directly affects the heart rate, if it is taken in excess, it makes the heartbeat faster and heats the body Many different types of vegetables shouldn’t be cooked together as the resulting chemical reactions can upset the digestive system and disturb body functions.
  • 116. Whole grains and rice supply essential carbohydrates and vitamin B complex. Fresh milk and ghee maintains the mucous lining of the digestive tract and alimentary canal and neutralize any acidity or heat in the stomach. Sugar is necessary for brain and other body functions. Honey is recommended as it is predigested and whole food. Dried ginger is also agreeable
  • 117. In the Gherand Samhita (5:20) the 'five vegetables' are said to be balasaka, kalasaka, patolapatraka, vastaka and himalochika. These are - leafy vegetables which are similar to spinach. Light, easily digestible pulses such as mung, red lentils, etc. are recommended as they supply protein, but pulses and gram such as horse gram, which are hard to digest and create flatulence, are to be avoided. Pure water which is free of chemicals, excess minerals and harmful bacteria is essential, particularly for the purification practices.
  • 118.
  • 119.
  • 120.
  • 121.
  • 122.
  • 123.