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IEA DSM Task
24:
Behaviour
Change in DSM
Phases I and II
Dr Sea Rotmann
Operating Agent Task 24
IEA DSM Task 24 Workshop, ...
What is special about Task 24?
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Task 24 – Objective in a tweet (or two)
The overarching impact of this Task is to provide a helicopter
overview of best pr...
Our audience: Behaviour Changers
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Government
Industr
y
Researcher
s
The Third Se...
IEA DSM Task 24
Phase I
Closing the Loop – Behaviour Change in DSM: From
Theory to Practice
Dr Sea Rotmann
Operating Agent...
Subtasks of Task 24
5 – Social network and expert platform
1 –
Helicopter
view of
models,
frameworks,
contexts and
evaluat...
Subtasks
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Subtask 1 –
Helicopter Overview of different
models of understanding,
...
Subtask 1 - Definitions of Task 24
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
http://www.slideshare.net/drsea/definitions-...
Subtask 1 – What is behaviour?
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
persistence
“unfrozen”
half-yearlyyearly
Conscio...
Subtask 1 –
Overview of different models of understanding behaviour
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Subtask 1 – The ‘Monster’ and its Wiki
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Subtask 1 – More definitions
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Models of behaviour help us to understand specific...
Subtask 1 –
Models of Understanding Behaviour – some caution
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
 Models are conce...
Subtask 1 –
Looking at different models of understanding behaviour
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Subtask 1 – Main models of understanding behaviour
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
INDIVIDUALISTIC (A-B-C Model...
Subtask 1 – Main models of understanding behaviour
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
INDIVIDUALISTIC (A-B-C Model...
Subtask 1 – Main models of understanding behaviour
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
INDIVIDUALISTIC (A-B-C Model...
Subtask 1 – Main models of understanding behaviour
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
SOCIALLY-ORIENTED MODELS
The...
Subtask 1 – Practice Theory – worked example
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
54
Figure 6: 3 Elements Worked Exa...
Subtask 1 – Theories of Change
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
 Central to many concepts of change is the merg...
Subtask 1 – Theories of Change – Changing habits
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
 Unfreezing/Refreezing
 Vigi...
Subtask 1 – Comparison between individual and social
approaches
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Darnton, A, Ver...
Subtask 1 – Comparison between individual and social
approaches – Pros and Cons of each
For more information, visit www.ie...
Subtask 1 – Main differences between disciplines
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
The programmes based (explicit...
Subtask 1 – Main differences between disciplines
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Social marketing, or insights ...
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Storytelling in DSM
IEA DSM Task 24 Phase 1 and 2
What’s Your Story?
Beth Karlin, Ph.D.
bethkarlin@gmail.com
What’s Your Story?
Introduce yourself in 60 seconds (or less):
say your name, your job, where you sit on the BCF,
why you’...
What do you remember?
Who do you remember?
Personal details?
Connection to Energy Cultures or Task
24?
Broad vision?
Call ...
Maybe stories are just
data with a soul.
Brene Brown
Three Thoughts on Storytelling
1. There’s always a story.
2. We are of two minds.
3. Keep it simple.
1. There is always a story
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
2. We are of 2 minds.
2. We are of two minds.
www.cred.columbia.edu
www.cred.columbia.edu
2. We are of two minds.
Three Thoughts on Storytelling
1. There’s always a story.
2. We are of two minds.
3. Keep it simple.
You have
60 seconds…
3. Keep it simple
8 seconds…
Crafting Your Story
MARSHALL GANZ //
THE NEW ORGANIZING INSTITUTE
Self Us Now
The Story of . . .
MARSHALL GANZ //
THE NEW ORGANIZING INSTITUTE
Self
The Story of . . .
Who are you and
what are you
passionate about?
Us
The Story of . . .
Why are you at this
conference/worksho
p?
Now
The Story of . . .
What do you want to
get out of this? What
is your call to
action?
Self Us Now
What’s Your
Story?
Introduce yourself in 60 seconds (or less)
Get Personal Find Common
Ground
Present a
Call t...
The Story of Task 24
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
http://vimeo.com/54915316
Language can be a problem!
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
That was our Eureka!
moment
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
What is storytelling?
‘Storytelling’ is the construction of a
desirable future based on a narrative
of past events, with a...
Stories are:
• Universal
• Help us process information
• Providing multiple perspectives
• Subjective, not one truth
• Aid...
The art and scientific methodology of storytelling
Narratives = social science tool aimed at providing way to
explore how ...
Oral vs written storytelling
Oral literature performed in traditional recitals are
considered a better projection of the i...
We’re all expert story tellers
YOUTUBE:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbe83S8FfO0&list=U
U_p3PlWDpLyDBh8TwUBmVHQ
Subtask 4 – Country context in form of stories
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Different energy efficiency stories
*Kathryn B. Janda & MarinaTopouzi (2015)Telling tales: using stories to remake energy ...
Examples of a love and a horror story in Building Retrofits
www.ieadsm.org
The New Zealand love story with insulation
www.ieadsm.org
Once upon a time... there was a beautiful country called New Zea...
The Great Australian horror story of insulation
www.ieadsm.org
What’s the take-away of these different types of stories?
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
• Hero stories: help ...
Even models of behaviour have their own stories:
The story of neoclassical economics in building retrofits
www.ieadsm.org
...
The story of systemic approaches in building retrofits
www.ieadsm.org
Together we’ll make the world go round!
We will co-c...
The pros and cons of each approach
• They do well with what they intend to do
and fit well within the current economic
and...
So… what’s the moral of the story of Task 24?
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
• There is no silver bullet anywh...
IEA DSM Task 24
Phase II
Helping the Behaviour Changers
The Subtasks of Phase II
5 – Expert Platform (upgraded)
6 –
Understanding
Behaviour
Changer
Practices inTop
DSM Areas
‘The...
Task 24 – Phase II
Objective in a tweet (or two)
To develop, in collaboration with the Behaviour Changers, a
toolbox of in...
Task 24 – Phase II
How it all fits together
What?
Subtask 6
‘The Issues’
Who?
Subtask 7
‘The People’
How?
Subtask 8
‘The T...
Task 24 Phase II
The Energy System
How does it look like
now?
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
The way we currently look at the Energy System
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
whole-system view which puts hum...
Another way we could look at the Energy System
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
The End User and their need for a service
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Personal
comfort
The end user’s behavioural response
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Technology
The end user’s wider context
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Cultural norms
Infrastructure
Geography/Cli
mateBu...
The national context
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Transmission & Distribution
Peak load issues
The national response
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Energy supply
Why is this system view circular?
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Feedback
Storytelling exercise 2
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
•Close your eyes and reflect on this story
•Choose one ...
Task 24 view of the Energy System
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
We pose that the Energy System begins
and end...
Task 24 Phase II
The Collective Impact
Approach
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Methodoloy of the
Behaviour Cha...
A model for collaboration
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Collective impact = the commitment of a group of impo...
Task 24 Phase II
Subtask 6 – Understanding the
Behaviour Changers’ Practices
and Priorities “The Issues”
For more informat...
What are the Top DSM Issues here?
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Top DSM Issues:
• Is there a national list of...
Multiple
Benefits?
What are the potentials, risks and (multiple) benefits for the
Top DSM Issues?
Political (actual) poten...
Who is the End User whose behaviour we are trying to
change?
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Tenants? In single...
What behaviour are we actually trying to change?
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Home owners: Share PV with you...
Task 24 Phase II
Subtask 7 - The Behaviour
Changer Framework “The
People”
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
A new...
Who are the RIGHT Behaviour Changers to collaborate on our
issue/behaviour?
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Gov...
Understanding the Behaviour Changers’ unique stories
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
Wellington Zoo’s Sustainability
Journey
Overview
• Wellington Zoo became the world’s first CarboNZero certified Zoo in 2013
• Waste sent to landfill reduced from ...
Waste
• Follow me printing
• Labelled recycling bins for
visitors and staff
• On-site composting facility
• Charitable don...
Water
• 15 rainwater harvesting tanks
• Water cleaning agent used in animal
habitats
• Water limiting devices installed on...
Energy
• Light sensors and timers installed on
equipment
• Transition to LED lighting
• Old vehicles replaced with more ef...
Energy challenge
Behaviour change focus: using heat
pumps/air-conditioning units
appropriately for the time of year
End us...
Potential challenges
Varying comfort
levels
Shared
responsibility
Lack of
motivation to
change
Lack of
information
Mixed u...
The Story of Task 24 – continued…
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
If there is ONE THING to take home from this:
For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
IT’S ALL ABOUT
THE PEOPLE!
Thank you very much for your
attention!
Any comments or questions?
drsea@orcon.net.nz
For more information, visit www.iead...
Wellington Task 24 workshop Energy Cultures conference
Wellington Task 24 workshop Energy Cultures conference
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Wellington Task 24 workshop Energy Cultures conference

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This workshop followed the Energy Cultures conference and was designed to showcase how different models of understanding behaviour worked in practice, how to better use storytelling and how to collectively design a behavioural intervention.

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Wellington Task 24 workshop Energy Cultures conference

  1. 1. IEA DSM Task 24: Behaviour Change in DSM Phases I and II Dr Sea Rotmann Operating Agent Task 24 IEA DSM Task 24 Workshop, Wellington July 8, 2016
  2. 2. What is special about Task 24? For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  3. 3. Task 24 – Objective in a tweet (or two) The overarching impact of this Task is to provide a helicopter overview of best practice approaches to behaviour change interventions and practical, tailored guidelines and tools of how to best design, implement, evaluate and disseminate them in real life.
  4. 4. Our audience: Behaviour Changers For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Government Industr y Researcher s The Third Sector Middle Actors
  5. 5. IEA DSM Task 24 Phase I Closing the Loop – Behaviour Change in DSM: From Theory to Practice Dr Sea Rotmann Operating Agent Task 24 Wellington, July 8, 2016
  6. 6. Subtasks of Task 24 5 – Social network and expert platform 1 – Helicopter view of models, frameworks, contexts and evaluation metrics 2 – In-depth case study analysis 3 – Evaluation Tool for different stakeholders 4 – Country- specific to do’s and not to do’s, guidelines and recommenda tions For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  7. 7. Subtasks For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Subtask 1 – Helicopter Overview of different models of understanding, frameworks, contexts, case studies and evaluation metrics
  8. 8. Subtask 1 - Definitions of Task 24 For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org http://www.slideshare.net/drsea/definitions-for-task-24
  9. 9. Subtask 1 – What is behaviour? For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org persistence “unfrozen” half-yearlyyearly Conscious, or well-considered action Once in a lifetime Active information-seeking monthlyrarely Little information-seeking Hardly thinking – taking action Habitualised routinesOnce-off “frozen” consciousness frequency weekly daily cookinggroceriesholidayingChoosing energy supplier Buying a car Buying a house
  10. 10. Subtask 1 – Overview of different models of understanding behaviour For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  11. 11. Subtask 1 – The ‘Monster’ and its Wiki For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  12. 12. Subtask 1 – More definitions For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Models of behaviour help us to understand specific behaviours, by identifying the underlying factors which influence them. There are individualistic models and social models. By contrast, theories of change show how behaviours change over time, and how they can be changed. Behavioural theory is diagnostic, and change theory is more pragmatic. Both are important to understand when designing interventions!
  13. 13. Subtask 1 – Models of Understanding Behaviour – some caution For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org  Models are concepts, not representations of behaviour  Behaviour is complex, models are deliberately simple  There is a limit to how far models will stretch  Models don’t tend to differentiate between people  Attitudes/awareness don’t always precede behaviour  Factors are not barriers
  14. 14. Subtask 1 – Looking at different models of understanding behaviour For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  15. 15. Subtask 1 – Main models of understanding behaviour For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org INDIVIDUALISTIC (A-B-C Models) Rational choice models based on cost-benefit calculations (neoclassical economics) Information deficit models are based on linear assumptions: information generates knowledge, which shapes attitudes, which lead to behaviour (neoclassical economics) Bounded rationality models include psychological principles such as cognitive biases and environmental constraints (behavioural economics) Value Action Gap shows the difference of what people say and what they do (social psychology)
  16. 16. Subtask 1 – Main models of understanding behaviour For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org INDIVIDUALISTIC (A-B-C Models) Figure 3: The ABC model based on Shove 2010 However, in practice people usually make more complex trade-offs between costs and gains (both financial and non- financial) and, consequently, the models are most likely not accurate. In Paul attitudes and values influence: behaviour and people chose to behave a certain way based on these values and attitudes
  17. 17. Subtask 1 – Main models of understanding behaviour For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org INDIVIDUALISTIC (A-B-C Models) DUAL PROCESS Models of Cognition Triandis’ Theory of Interpersonal Behaviour (TIB)
  18. 18. Subtask 1 – Main models of understanding behaviour For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org SOCIALLY-ORIENTED MODELS Theories of Consumption as Social Practices (Practice Theory) DECC running header 24
  19. 19. Subtask 1 – Practice Theory – worked example For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org 54 Figure 6: 3 Elements Worked Example: Linedrying
  20. 20. Subtask 1 – Theories of Change For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org  Central to many concepts of change is the merging of theory and practice  Applied approaches: Social Marketing, Intervention Mapping, Defra’s 4E Model…
  21. 21. Subtask 1 – Theories of Change – Changing habits For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org  Unfreezing/Refreezing  Vigilant Monitoring  Implementation Intentions But: Individuals only, they need to be pre-motivated, it needs to be done quickly and intensely and they may not be easily scalable  MOMENTS OF CHANGE!
  22. 22. Subtask 1 – Comparison between individual and social approaches For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Darnton, A, Verplanken, B, White, P and Whitmarsh, L (2011). Habits, Routines and Sustainable Lifestyles: A summary report to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. AD Research & Analysis for Defra, London.
  23. 23. Subtask 1 – Comparison between individual and social approaches – Pros and Cons of each For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Individual Models Social Models Pros Cons Pros Cons Some have understanding of dual process of cognition Easy to follow A+B+C= behaviour change Can look at various (mostly influencing) contexts affecting individuals Known and tested Very powerful with segmentation and bottom-up tailoring Scaleability Inclusivity Breadth of Scope Causal relationship hard to determine Not shown to be that effective, especially if based on intentions More complex models hard to use Takes systemic approach thus easily scaled up If you change a practice, it can be a global change Looped, re-enforcing Influencing and contextual factors Fosters collaboration among all sectors More realistic? Too complex to understand Dependent on many elements to work together Frustrating if right collaboration can’t be fostered Hard to put into practice May only speed up change
  24. 24. Subtask 1 – Main differences between disciplines For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org The programmes based (explicitly and implicitly) on economic theories usually translate into approaches that: - focus mainly or even solely on individuals - are mostly technocratic thus seem to be generating biggest benefits for the supply side, not the end user - regard individuals as instrumentally/economically rational creatures (‘Homo economicus’) - regard information deficits as an important cause of ‘non-rational’ behaviours - focus often on short and one-off financial incentives - focus on extrinsic motivations mainly (ie are dependent on the response they evoke from others) - do not normally tailor their approach to the individual characteristics - lack flexibility and room for engagement, co-creation and participation - monitor mainly quantitative aspects and work with calculated or modeled savings Behavioural economics-based approaches also include insights from social psychology, and for instance focus on the power of nudging people into different behaviours through their infrastructural, institutional or design environment.
  25. 25. Subtask 1 – Main differences between disciplines For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Social marketing, or insights from psychology, sociology and collaborative learning and practice theory approaches are increasingly being used. These programmes are often cross-sectoral and use elements of theories and models in an eclectic manner. Very often, user engagement is central to the design. They do take account of the impact of the wider context and environment and social norms and are thus clearly based on a more systemic perspective/theory or model. They: - focus on collaboration and institutional capacity building - focus on building trust in market parties and information sources - target end user needs and multiple benefits - use multiple definitions of success - perform pre-scoping - allow for engagement and participation - allow for flexibility and iteration of programmes - focus on institutional change - focus on lifestyles - use the power of social norms
  26. 26. For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  27. 27. Storytelling in DSM IEA DSM Task 24 Phase 1 and 2
  28. 28. What’s Your Story? Beth Karlin, Ph.D. bethkarlin@gmail.com
  29. 29. What’s Your Story? Introduce yourself in 60 seconds (or less): say your name, your job, where you sit on the BCF, why you’re here and something personal
  30. 30. What do you remember? Who do you remember? Personal details? Connection to Energy Cultures or Task 24? Broad vision? Call to action?
  31. 31. Maybe stories are just data with a soul. Brene Brown
  32. 32. Three Thoughts on Storytelling 1. There’s always a story. 2. We are of two minds. 3. Keep it simple.
  33. 33. 1. There is always a story For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  34. 34. 2. We are of 2 minds.
  35. 35. 2. We are of two minds. www.cred.columbia.edu
  36. 36. www.cred.columbia.edu 2. We are of two minds.
  37. 37. Three Thoughts on Storytelling 1. There’s always a story. 2. We are of two minds. 3. Keep it simple.
  38. 38. You have 60 seconds… 3. Keep it simple 8 seconds…
  39. 39. Crafting Your Story MARSHALL GANZ // THE NEW ORGANIZING INSTITUTE
  40. 40. Self Us Now The Story of . . . MARSHALL GANZ // THE NEW ORGANIZING INSTITUTE
  41. 41. Self The Story of . . .
  42. 42. Who are you and what are you passionate about?
  43. 43. Us The Story of . . .
  44. 44. Why are you at this conference/worksho p?
  45. 45. Now The Story of . . .
  46. 46. What do you want to get out of this? What is your call to action?
  47. 47. Self Us Now What’s Your Story? Introduce yourself in 60 seconds (or less) Get Personal Find Common Ground Present a Call to Action
  48. 48. The Story of Task 24 For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org http://vimeo.com/54915316
  49. 49. Language can be a problem! For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  50. 50. That was our Eureka! moment For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  51. 51. What is storytelling? ‘Storytelling’ is the construction of a desirable future based on a narrative of past events, with a plot that expresses some causal relationship To read more: Rotmann et al (2015). Once Upon a Time… How to tell an energy efficiency story that ‘sticks’. ECEEE Summer study proceedings And ERSS Special Edition on Storytelling & Narratives For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  52. 52. Stories are: • Universal • Help us process information • Providing multiple perspectives • Subjective, not one truth • Aid recall • Shape identity • Make connections For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  53. 53. The art and scientific methodology of storytelling Narratives = social science tool aimed at providing way to explore how big events (policies) impact on small scale (individuals) Allow for quick, practical and useful understanding of complexity of interconnected factors in behaviour research We all turn everything into a narrative in order to remember it For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  54. 54. Oral vs written storytelling Oral literature performed in traditional recitals are considered a better projection of the innermost depth of a society's social and cultural life, its traditions, habits, customs, behaviour, rites and so on, compared to written literature. For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  55. 55. We’re all expert story tellers YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbe83S8FfO0&list=U U_p3PlWDpLyDBh8TwUBmVHQ
  56. 56. Subtask 4 – Country context in form of stories For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  57. 57. Different energy efficiency stories *Kathryn B. Janda & MarinaTopouzi (2015)Telling tales: using stories to remake energy policy, Building Research & Information, 43:4, 516-533 .
  58. 58. Examples of a love and a horror story in Building Retrofits www.ieadsm.org
  59. 59. The New Zealand love story with insulation www.ieadsm.org Once upon a time... there was a beautiful country called New Zealand,which had very cold, damp houses. Every day...Kiwis shivered and froze, but they just told each other to stop being a sissy and put on another jumper. But, one day...the new right-wing Government decided it needed to show it wasn’t uncaring and evil and created a programme called Warm Up New Zealand. It was meant to insulate a quarter of the housing stock, create many jobs and a new market, and reduce energy use, energy bills and CO2. Because of that...the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority set about tendering for the best contractors in the country to fulfil this lofty goal. But then...they realised that people weren’t that interested in insulation, they rather spent their money on a new kitchen and kept putting on those jumpers! Because of that... they concentrated on using Third Party Providers and other community groups to ensure that at least the most needy and vulnerable people got free insulation and clean heating installed. So, finally... they did an evaluation and found that the real benefits - $5 for every $1 spent, lay in the health improvements, not a new market or energy savings or lower bills. And, ever since then... The other Kiwis also slowly realised that being warm and cozy in your home was maybe just as important as having a new kitchen. The End.
  60. 60. The Great Australian horror story of insulation www.ieadsm.org
  61. 61. What’s the take-away of these different types of stories? For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org • Hero stories: help with understanding Behaviour Changers and what drives them when designing interventions, they provide inspiration but can lead to disappointment and even turn into horror stories • Learning stories: can be difficult but also balance and develop the inspiration provided by hero stories, provide support for explaining unintended consequences • Love stories: can convince decision-makers and the public why energy efficiency is worth it • Horror stories: are very memorable and good scare tactics, but usually to be avoided at all cost
  62. 62. Even models of behaviour have their own stories: The story of neoclassical economics in building retrofits www.ieadsm.org Money makes the world go round! You need to change your home’s energy use and we will help you pay (part of) its retrofitting By the way, you need to pay up first and it might take a while before we pay you back, if ever The info we need from you will teach you all you need to know You only need to make a one-off decision to invest We have the technology you need, contractors or installers (you will need to find/choose) will put it in If you don’t understand the technology just don’t touch the buttons! You will save money for a nice weekend in Marbella You only need to give us a bill from your installer, we probably won’t check how much energy you saved Neither will we tell you, you need to figure that out yourself What counts for us is how many m2 we get insulated, how many homes we retrofitted or how much money has been spent against the budget. We will do the number crunching, don’t worry, we don’t need to know what you actually saved, that’s what national models are for But if you do want to know how much energy you saved, buy a metering device!
  63. 63. The story of systemic approaches in building retrofits www.ieadsm.org Together we’ll make the world go round! We will co-create and co-design our interventions with you You embody what we need to know and change: what you do, feel, learn… We will help you understand and use the technology and train those that install and sell it to you to tailor it to your needs We will create a supportive material, institutional and social environment Your needs are important so we need to do this together, as if this were your kitchen Your life will change It’s all about us now, our grandchildren and their future we have in our hands Quality matters, and we will keep learning and sharing those learnings with you If we need to be flexible, we will This is only the start and your home is only the first step We will monitor, calculate and report on energy, money, health, welfare, comfort, wellbeing And learnings based on qualitative and quantitative inputs will be shared (with you) We will help you figure out what your impact is to be able to make sure you get where we all collectively want to!
  64. 64. The pros and cons of each approach • They do well with what they intend to do and fit well within the current economic and political system and way of thinking • The programmes are relatively easy to evaluate in quantitative terms and often show good results • The (retrofitting) market can grow • Subsidies are often used up to the max • Many homes do get insulated • Behavioural economics does manage to nudge a certain percentage • Free riders upgrade their plans and retrofit more comprehensively • Sometimes even a new norm seems to be emerging… • These types of interventions are very complex with many partners who have different mandates, needs and restrictions • They cannot be driven by policy alone, need all levels collaborating • Not everyone wants to change everything or their lifestyle • Not everyone wants to engage but it is important to ensure that the naysayers are not becoming the over-riding voice • The flexibility of changing goals, aims and interrelatedness of issues etc makes it difficult to evaluate  But people tend to like them much more! For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Economic approaches Systemic approaches
  65. 65. So… what’s the moral of the story of Task 24? For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org • There is no silver bullet anywhere but the potential remains huge • Homo economicus doesn’t exist (in energy humans) • Habits are the most difficult thing to break, though it’s easiest during moments of change • There is no such thing as individual energy use • We need to look at whole-system, societal change • This can’t be done in isolation by one sector - collaboration is key • Everyone has a piece of the puzzle but we can’t see the whole picture yet • We need a shared learning and collaboration platform that works • We also need a shared language based on narratives
  66. 66. IEA DSM Task 24 Phase II Helping the Behaviour Changers
  67. 67. The Subtasks of Phase II 5 – Expert Platform (upgraded) 6 – Understanding Behaviour Changer Practices inTop DSM Areas ‘The Issues’ 7 – Identifying Behaviour Changers in these areas ‘The People’ 8 – Developing a toolbox of interventions to help Behaviour Changers ‘TheTools’ 9 – Standardising Evaluation beyond kWh ‘The Measures’ For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org 10 –Telling an Overarching Story ‘The Story”
  68. 68. Task 24 – Phase II Objective in a tweet (or two) To develop, in collaboration with the Behaviour Changers, a toolbox of interventions that works for their specific DSM issues, contexts (sectoral and national), mandates and needs. We also aim to extract cohesive, overarching themes to tell a coherent international story.
  69. 69. Task 24 – Phase II How it all fits together What? Subtask 6 ‘The Issues’ Who? Subtask 7 ‘The People’ How? Subtask 8 ‘The Tools’ Why? Subtask 9 ‘The Measure’ So what? Subtask 10 ‘The Story’ Subtask 1 Subtask 2 Subtask 4 Subtask 5 Subtask 1 Subtask 4 Subtask 3
  70. 70. Task 24 Phase II The Energy System How does it look like now? For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  71. 71. The way we currently look at the Energy System For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org whole-system view which puts human needs, behaviours and (ir)rationalities at the center of interventions geared at system change. Instead, if we look at the Energy System through the human lens (Figure 2), we can see that it isn’t necessarily this top-down/left-right linear realtionship starting with supply and ending with the end user, but rather a circular relationship which actually starts with the end user need for an energy service (click here for a short video presentation explaining this in more detail). Figure 1. Current, linear way of looking at the energy system (starting with supply) eetd.lbl.gov T O P D O W N SUPPLY ! TRANSMISSION & DISTRIBUTION ! TECHNOLOGY ! USER
  72. 72. Another way we could look at the Energy System For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  73. 73. The End User and their need for a service For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Personal comfort
  74. 74. The end user’s behavioural response For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Technology
  75. 75. The end user’s wider context For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Cultural norms Infrastructure Geography/Cli mateBuilding stock Politics
  76. 76. The national context For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Transmission & Distribution Peak load issues
  77. 77. The national response For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Energy supply
  78. 78. Why is this system view circular? For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Feedback
  79. 79. Storytelling exercise 2 For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org •Close your eyes and reflect on this story •Choose one particular word from the story that stands out for you and write it down •Form groups of 5 •Tell a story with those 5 words, including duplicates •Use the story spine •Share your story
  80. 80. Task 24 view of the Energy System For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org We pose that the Energy System begins and ends with the human need for the services derived from energy (warmth, comfort, entertainment, mobility, hygiene, safety etc) and that behavioural interventions using technology, market and business models and changes to supply and delivery of energy are the all- important means to that end.
  81. 81. Task 24 Phase II The Collective Impact Approach For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Methodoloy of the Behaviour Changer Framework
  82. 82. A model for collaboration For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Collective impact = the commitment of a group of important actors from different sectors to a common agenda for solving a specific social problem.
  83. 83. Task 24 Phase II Subtask 6 – Understanding the Behaviour Changers’ Practices and Priorities “The Issues” For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Deciding on the issues to focus on
  84. 84. What are the Top DSM Issues here? For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Top DSM Issues: • Is there a national list of DSM issues? • What are the biggest behavioural potentials? • What DSM policies and programmes are already tackling these issues and how? • What are their approximate contribution to the country’s load management (economic, technical, political and societal potentials)? • What are the risks and multiple benefits of each?
  85. 85. Multiple Benefits? What are the potentials, risks and (multiple) benefits for the Top DSM Issues? Political (actual) potential Social Potential Economic Potential Technical potential RISKS? Multiple Benefits? Multiple Benefits?
  86. 86. Who is the End User whose behaviour we are trying to change? For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Tenants? In single homes or apartment buildings? Home owners? (single or apartment) Office workers in a large commercial building? Retail workers in smaller retail buildings? Landlords? Private or large-scale? Social housing? Commercial? Building Management Operators? Office or eg hospitals? Smart meter/feedback/EE technology installers or developers? Drivers? Truck or private vehicle? Behaviour or Mode Switching? Freight companies? Behaviour or technology switching? SMEs? Which sector? CEOs or energy managers/CFOs? Who else could it be? Zoo staff? g at the energy system (starting with supply) DISTRIBUTION ! TECHNOLOGY ! USER
  87. 87. What behaviour are we actually trying to change? For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Home owners: Share PV with your neighbourhood (NZ) Commercial building tenants and landlords: co-develop green leases that work (SE) Restaurant owners/SMEs: close doors, turn off burners, lights etc (Fort Collins, USA) Building Management Operators in Hospitals: how to better document and communicate EE (CA) Energy companies: Go all the way with energy efficiency regulations, not just the easy route (AT) ICT in Universities: What are the low-hanging fruit? How can we deliver big savings easily? (NL) Residential retrofits: Training Middle Actors in communities (IE) ON & DISTRIBUTION ! TECHNOLOGY ! USER
  88. 88. Task 24 Phase II Subtask 7 - The Behaviour Changer Framework “The People” For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org A new way of visualising the energy system
  89. 89. Who are the RIGHT Behaviour Changers to collaborate on our issue/behaviour? For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org Government – which level, agency, person/s? Industry – which sector, organisation, person/s? Researchers – which discipline, University, person/s? The Third Sector – which sector, association, person/s? Intermediaries – which sector, company, person/s?
  90. 90. Understanding the Behaviour Changers’ unique stories For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  91. 91. For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  92. 92. Wellington Zoo’s Sustainability Journey
  93. 93. Overview • Wellington Zoo became the world’s first CarboNZero certified Zoo in 2013 • Waste sent to landfill reduced from 93% of total waste to just 19%. • Water use has been reduced by 24 million litres since 2011 • Energy use has stayed at similar levels despite a significant increase in visitors and new developments
  94. 94. Waste • Follow me printing • Labelled recycling bins for visitors and staff • On-site composting facility • Charitable donations • Value chain analysis of animal food • Animal habitats are made of recycled materials • Use hand dryers instead of paper towels in bathrooms
  95. 95. Water • 15 rainwater harvesting tanks • Water cleaning agent used in animal habitats • Water limiting devices installed on taps and hoses • Dry clean habitats in summer • Way to go for H2O campaign
  96. 96. Energy • Light sensors and timers installed on equipment • Transition to LED lighting • Old vehicles replaced with more efficient alternatives • Push for Power campaign • Check meters are being installed • Solar water heating facility in The Nest Te Kohanga • 48 solar PV panels
  97. 97. Energy challenge Behaviour change focus: using heat pumps/air-conditioning units appropriately for the time of year End user: Zoo Staff
  98. 98. Potential challenges Varying comfort levels Shared responsibility Lack of motivation to change Lack of information Mixed use of space
  99. 99. The Story of Task 24 – continued… For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org
  100. 100. If there is ONE THING to take home from this: For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org IT’S ALL ABOUT THE PEOPLE!
  101. 101. Thank you very much for your attention! Any comments or questions? drsea@orcon.net.nz For more information, visit www.ieadsm.org

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