Showered with feedback – How real-time
information can change our daily habits
IEA DSM Task 24 - Closing the Loop - Behavi...
The Bits to Energy Lab is a research initiative
of the ETH Zurich, the University of St. Gallen
and the University of Bamb...
We combine IT and social science concepts to
motivate households to reduce their energy
consumption.

Measure / Retrieve
b...
Our study was carried out in collaboration with
partners from Academia, Industry and Politics.

Bits to Energy Lab at ETH ...
Behavioral science insights need to be translated
into scaled interventions and products.

Attitudes, perceptions, habits,...
Hot water is 2nd largest contributor to
residential energy use, but hardly measured
and brought to users‘ attention.
Power...
Promising results of a pilot study motivated
further R&D to move from prototype to mass
production.
Pilot study (2011) wit...
Users can install the smart water meter
amphiro a1 in three simple steps.

B2E Lab
October 2013

Slide 8
© ETH / HSG
What the smart water meter measures and
displays

Measures
Flow rate
Temperature
Duration (shower, interruptions)
Derived ...
One third of the 697 participating households
were randomly assigned into the control group
(only temperature displayed).
...
Our 2-month study combines shower data with
survey information.

csv csv
csv csv
csv
csv csv
csv csv
csv
csv

46,835 showe...
What the implementation of the field trial
looked like in reality

Visual data readout
B2E Lab
October 2013

Slide 12
© ET...
The vast majority of study participants was
overall satisfied with the device (83%) and
intended to continue using it (79%...
Households with the display information
reduced their shower consumption by 23%.

Households with the display decreased th...
The per-household energy reduction exceeds
the impact of electricity smart meters by far
(and at a much lower price point)...
Summary of key reduction figures - thank you
for listening.

Reduction per household per year:
– 23% reduction of energy a...
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Task 24 - Why polar bears are good in the shower

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Verena Tiefenbeck, from ETH, presents the great shower smart meter technology that shows you in polar bears how much water and energy you have used. From Task 24 workshop on behaviour change in Luzern, October 15, 2013.

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Task 24 - Why polar bears are good in the shower

  1. 1. Showered with feedback – How real-time information can change our daily habits IEA DSM Task 24 - Closing the Loop - Behavior Change in DSM: From Theory to Policies and Practice Verena Tiefenbeck Bits to Energy Lab, ETH Zurich iHomeLab (Hochschule Luzern), October 15, 2012
  2. 2. The Bits to Energy Lab is a research initiative of the ETH Zurich, the University of St. Gallen and the University of Bamberg. Information Management (E. Fleisch, ETH Zurich, lead) Distributed Systems Group (F. Mattern, ETH Zurich) Operations Management (E. Fleisch, University St. Gallen) Energy Efficient Systems (T. Staake, University Bamberg) B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 2 © ETH / HSG
  3. 3. We combine IT and social science concepts to motivate households to reduce their energy consumption. Measure / Retrieve behavioral data Data analytics B2E Lab October 2013 Place Interventions (targeting behavior or enhancing automation) Measure and adjust Slide 3 © ETH / HSG Research-based implementation Transfer to practice in collaboration with organizations
  4. 4. Our study was carried out in collaboration with partners from Academia, Industry and Politics. Bits to Energy Lab at ETH Zurich (lead) Amphiro AG ewz (Energiewerke Zürich) BFE (Swiss Federal Department of Energy) University of Lausanne B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 4 © ETH / HSG
  5. 5. Behavioral science insights need to be translated into scaled interventions and products. Attitudes, perceptions, habits, subconscious processes, Social sciences: mechanisms for behavior change Promising and cost-effective pilots and prototypes Application and large-scale implementation is missing Rocky path from concept / prototype to large-scale deployment B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 5 © ETH / HSG
  6. 6. Hot water is 2nd largest contributor to residential energy use, but hardly measured and brought to users‘ attention. Powering metering devices is tricky in wet environment Energy dimension: low awareness Feedback at point of consumption Easy to understand High user control Visible and tangible (water) Source: DoE Buildings Energy Data Book 2011 B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 6 © ETH / HSG
  7. 7. Promising results of a pilot study motivated further R&D to move from prototype to mass production. Pilot study (2011) with promising results: Prototype of smart shower meter Energy and water consumption: 22% reduction However: Sample size (N=61) Sampling bias Methodological issues → Further research and development, cleaner & larger study B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 7 © ETH / HSG
  8. 8. Users can install the smart water meter amphiro a1 in three simple steps. B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 8 © ETH / HSG
  9. 9. What the smart water meter measures and displays Measures Flow rate Temperature Duration (shower, interruptions) Derived from that per shower Water volume Energy consumption Display (standard) Temperature Water volume Energy efficiency class Polar bear animation B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 9 © ETH / HSG Amphiro harvests its energy from the water flow.
  10. 10. One third of the 697 participating households were randomly assigned into the control group (only temperature displayed). Treatment group Control group 33% 67% B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 10 © ETH / HSG
  11. 11. Our 2-month study combines shower data with survey information. csv csv csv csv csv csv csv csv csv csv csv 46,835 showers in 636 households 697 initial surveys,coded 629 complete datasets Survey & smart metering data (Uni Lausanne) 666 final surveys, coded B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 11 © ETH / HSG
  12. 12. What the implementation of the field trial looked like in reality Visual data readout B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 12 © ETH / HSG
  13. 13. The vast majority of study participants was overall satisfied with the device (83%) and intended to continue using it (79%). "I'm overall satisfied with the shower meter." "I / We intend to continue using the device after the study." 2% 1% 2% 4% 5% 5% Agree strongly 10% 10% Agree Neither nor 50% 54% Disagree 32% 25% Disagree strongly Don't know N=665 (Participants of final survey incl. control group) N=445 (Participants of final survey excl. control group) B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 13 © ETH / HSG
  14. 14. Households with the display information reduced their shower consumption by 23%. Households with the display decreased their water and energy consumption by 23% relative to the control group – Time: -22% – Breaks: +12% – Temperature: -0.25°C – Flow rate: no significant change Per-shower reduction – 10.6 liters – 360 Wh (η=100%) → 550 Wh (η=65%) Effects stable throughout the study (long-term study still ongoing) B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 14 © ETH / HSG
  15. 15. The per-household energy reduction exceeds the impact of electricity smart meters by far (and at a much lower price point). Deployment in 5% of Swiss households = equivalent of electricity production by Swiss wind power in 2012 ROI much higher than for electricity smart meters Reduction Electricity smart meters1 Smart shower meters Energy – relative consumption change 3.2% of household electricity 23% of shower energy Energy – absolute change 86 kWh 443 kWh / 8500 15 96 Water (liters/yr) Cost savings (CHF/yr) 1source: ewz-Studie Smart Metering, www.stadt-zuerich.ch/content/dam/stzh/ewz/Deutsch/Netz/Publikationen und Broschueren/Praesentation_ewz_sm.pdf B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 15 © ETH / HSG
  16. 16. Summary of key reduction figures - thank you for listening. Reduction per household per year: – 23% reduction of energy and water use in the shower – Water: 8500 liters – 443 kWh – CHF 96 Thank you very much for your attention. Contact Verena Tiefenbeck │ Bits to Energy Lab │ Chair for Information Management Department Management, Technology and Economics│ ETH Zurich Office: + 41 44 632 3953│ Email: vtiefenbeck@ethz.ch B2E Lab October 2013 Slide 16 © ETH / HSG

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