What does
Gamification mean?
Matt Batey,
PhD Candidate at De Montfort University
Belgium Expert IEA Task 24
Why? Research Perspective:
Why? Research Perspective:
• User engagement
on energy
efficiency
Why? Research Perspective:
• User engagement
on energy
efficiency
• How to maintain
user interest?
Why? Research Perspective:
1. Incorporating user preferences into
development process
2. User-involvement in innovation cr...
Why? Research Perspective:
1. Incorporating user preferences into
development process
2. User-involvement in innovation cr...
Why? Practice Perspective:
• Energy management in the context of a future
workplace
• Flexible, shared office
• Users respo...
Why not try a game
approach?
• "Games can change the world"
• Help us develop solutions to
complex problems without
pressu...
Gamification is good
Gamification is good
Gamification is good
Gamification is good
Gamification is good
• Points - people like
to be rewarded
• Badges - people
like recognition
• Leaderboards -
people like ...
Gamification is bad
Gamification is bad
• "most deployments of gamification represent “exploitationware,” in that they extract
real value from u...
Gamification is bad
• "most deployments of gamification represent “exploitationware,” in that they extract
real value from u...
Gamification is bad
• "most deployments of gamification represent “exploitationware,” in that they extract
real value from u...
Gamification is bad
• "most deployments of gamification represent “exploitationware,” in that they extract
real value from u...
Gamification is bad
• "most deployments of gamification represent “exploitationware,” in that they extract
real value from u...
What's in a game
• Motivations
• Extrinsic motivators (money,
rewards) work for mechanical
tasks
• For anything cognitive,...
What's in a game
• Motivations
• Extrinsic motivators (money,
rewards) work for mechanical
tasks
• For anything cognitive,...
What's in a game
• Motivations
• Extrinsic motivators (money,
rewards) work for mechanical
tasks
• For anything cognitive,...
What's in a game
• Motivations
• Extrinsic motivators (money,
rewards) work for mechanical
tasks
• For anything cognitive,...
What's in a game
• essentially free
• separate
• uncertain
• unproductive
• governed
• make-believe
(Huizinga, 1938. Caill...
What's in a game
• Reward = Incentive ?
• Difference between motivating a
first-time behaviour & repeat
behaviour
• Altruis...
The Third Way?
• Can Points, badges and leader boards be effective
behavioural drivers if given real meaning or currency f...
Conclusions
• Turning real world problems into a game likely
to produce unpredictable results
• Engagement & behaviours te...
Break-out Session
• Scenario one:
Consider your office.
Imagine there will be a financial incentive for
building users to ad...
Break-out Session
• Scenario two:
One day every 3 months, you get together with
your team for a game. You can choose where...
Matt Batey IEA DSM Task 24 workshop gamification
Matt Batey IEA DSM Task 24 workshop gamification
Matt Batey IEA DSM Task 24 workshop gamification
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Matt Batey IEA DSM Task 24 workshop gamification

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Matt Batey IEA DSM Task 24 workshop gamification

  1. 1. What does Gamification mean? Matt Batey, PhD Candidate at De Montfort University Belgium Expert IEA Task 24
  2. 2. Why? Research Perspective:
  3. 3. Why? Research Perspective: • User engagement on energy efficiency
  4. 4. Why? Research Perspective: • User engagement on energy efficiency • How to maintain user interest?
  5. 5. Why? Research Perspective: 1. Incorporating user preferences into development process 2. User-involvement in innovation creates sense of ownership, hence personal interest in its success 3. Energy-efficiency achieved within project as a stated aim
  6. 6. Why? Research Perspective: 1. Incorporating user preferences into development process 2. User-involvement in innovation creates sense of ownership, hence personal interest in its success 3. Energy-efficiency achieved within project as a stated aim • How to maintain user interest?
  7. 7. Why? Practice Perspective: • Energy management in the context of a future workplace • Flexible, shared office • Users responsible for energy efficiency • Is gamification a route to optimising performance?
  8. 8. Why not try a game approach? • "Games can change the world" • Help us develop solutions to complex problems without pressure • Create clear paths of action towards achieving a goal
  9. 9. Gamification is good
  10. 10. Gamification is good
  11. 11. Gamification is good
  12. 12. Gamification is good
  13. 13. Gamification is good • Points - people like to be rewarded • Badges - people like recognition • Leaderboards - people like to compete
  14. 14. Gamification is bad
  15. 15. Gamification is bad • "most deployments of gamification represent “exploitationware,” in that they extract real value from users and employees in return for mere virtual tokens" Ian Bogost;
  16. 16. Gamification is bad • "most deployments of gamification represent “exploitationware,” in that they extract real value from users and employees in return for mere virtual tokens" Ian Bogost; • “taking the thing that is least essential to games and representing it as the core of the experience,” "Gamificationʼ... can go take a long walk off a short pier." Margaret Robertson, Hide and Seek
  17. 17. Gamification is bad • "most deployments of gamification represent “exploitationware,” in that they extract real value from users and employees in return for mere virtual tokens" Ian Bogost; • “taking the thing that is least essential to games and representing it as the core of the experience,” "Gamificationʼ... can go take a long walk off a short pier." Margaret Robertson, Hide and Seek • "don't just fail to engage players; they can actually damage existing interest or engagement" Elizabeth Lawley, Rochester
  18. 18. Gamification is bad • "most deployments of gamification represent “exploitationware,” in that they extract real value from users and employees in return for mere virtual tokens" Ian Bogost; • “taking the thing that is least essential to games and representing it as the core of the experience,” "Gamificationʼ... can go take a long walk off a short pier." Margaret Robertson, Hide and Seek • "don't just fail to engage players; they can actually damage existing interest or engagement" Elizabeth Lawley, Rochester • "[do not] adequately account for the ways in which individuals and contexts differ." Judd Antin, Yahoo! Research
  19. 19. Gamification is bad • "most deployments of gamification represent “exploitationware,” in that they extract real value from users and employees in return for mere virtual tokens" Ian Bogost; • “taking the thing that is least essential to games and representing it as the core of the experience,” "Gamificationʼ... can go take a long walk off a short pier." Margaret Robertson, Hide and Seek • "don't just fail to engage players; they can actually damage existing interest or engagement" Elizabeth Lawley, Rochester • "[do not] adequately account for the ways in which individuals and contexts differ." Judd Antin, Yahoo! Research • Even Jane MacGonagle: "I don't do 'gamification,' and I'm not prepared to stand up and say I think it works. If the game is not about a goal you're intrinsically motivated by, it won't work."
  20. 20. What's in a game • Motivations • Extrinsic motivators (money, rewards) work for mechanical tasks • For anything cognitive, intrinsic motivations are required:
  21. 21. What's in a game • Motivations • Extrinsic motivators (money, rewards) work for mechanical tasks • For anything cognitive, intrinsic motivations are required: AUTONOMY
  22. 22. What's in a game • Motivations • Extrinsic motivators (money, rewards) work for mechanical tasks • For anything cognitive, intrinsic motivations are required: AUTONOMY COMPETENCE
  23. 23. What's in a game • Motivations • Extrinsic motivators (money, rewards) work for mechanical tasks • For anything cognitive, intrinsic motivations are required: AUTONOMY COMPETENCE RELATEDNESS
  24. 24. What's in a game • essentially free • separate • uncertain • unproductive • governed • make-believe (Huizinga, 1938. Caillios, 1957) • Game scenarios work best on those without a strong opinion on the subject (Haring, 2013)
  25. 25. What's in a game • Reward = Incentive ? • Difference between motivating a first-time behaviour & repeat behaviour • Altruism vs. Self-interest
  26. 26. The Third Way? • Can Points, badges and leader boards be effective behavioural drivers if given real meaning or currency for users: • reputation, recognition, personal satisfaction • tradable assets (trading becomes an additional game layer) • Especially in a workplace context based on extrinsic rewards (pay, promotions, titles, etc.) • Rajat Paharia, CEO of Bunchball, advocates gamification tools such as: "goal setting, real-time feedback, transparency, mastery, competition, teams..."
  27. 27. Conclusions • Turning real world problems into a game likely to produce unpredictable results • Engagement & behaviours temporary • Can help remove barriers to entry to new behaviours • ...
  28. 28. Break-out Session • Scenario one: Consider your office. Imagine there will be a financial incentive for building users to adopt their energy saving behavior. Each team will have financial fund for training and for social events such as trips away and team dinners.
  29. 29. Break-out Session • Scenario two: One day every 3 months, you get together with your team for a game. You can choose where you spend the day, within a reasonable budget, so long as its a place otherwise open to the public (e.g. bar, restaurant). The players will communicate with the building energy and maintenance manager, suggest

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