What do the All Blacks have to do with DSM?

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Stephen Drew from EnerNOC tells the exciting story of a demand management company in the international, and NZ context. Told at the Wellington IEA DSM storytelling workshop on March 17, 2014.

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What do the All Blacks have to do with DSM?

  1. 1. IEA DSM workshop Stephen Drew 17 March 2014
  2. 2. 2 Setting our benchmark IRB world ranking Team Year of first test Matches Won Lost Draw % 1 New Zealand 1903 512 390 104 18 78 2 South Africa 1891 428 272 135 21 66 3 Australia 1899 563 287 260 16 52 4 England 1871 671 360 261 50 57 5 Ireland 1875 634 266 337 31 44 6 Wales 1881 660 340 292 28 54 7 France 1906 701 385 284 32 57 8 Samoa 1924 194 94 95 5 50 9 Argentina 1910 375 205 160 10 56 10 Scotland 1871 631 266 333 32 45 Our All Blacks lead rugby like our Interruptible Load leads DSM
  3. 3. 3 Middle of Middle Earth Hydro lakes We are top of the South Island “electrically” Auckland DR – Lower North Island – 20MW Wind Renewable generation HVDC Geothermal HVDC Pole 3 Wellington
  4. 4. 4 Our grid’s inertia is changing Normal flow Maximum flow Power flow (MW) 850 1050 Bi-pole cover (MW) 500 500 HVDC Reserve risk 350 550 CCGT Reserve risk 385 385 Contingent Event risks are increasing the speed that they can happen 3 CCGT’s 385MW Aluminium Pacific Aluminium (Tiwai Point) 600MW Newsprint Norske Skog (Kawerau) 80MW reserve HVDC 1050MW S  N transfer = Contingent Event which sets the reserve risk Poles #2 and #3 operating on the HVDC
  5. 5. 5 Our proud DSM history in New Zealand • 1950’s - All State hydro, £5/kW demand, ripple hot water to manage peaks • 1960’s - prices in c/kWh to support coal station(s) for dry years, pole #1, steel and pulp&paper begin production • 1970’s – Huntly (coal) and natural gas, alumimum starts production • 1980’s – ECNZ and power boards – central price control • 1989 - NZSteel melters became the first load to provide reserve to the HVDC transfer • 1990’s – 1992 was a bad dry year, ECNZ split, CCGTs arrive and 1996 wholesale competitive market begins with 6s and 60s reserve products, Total Metering (EI) develops algorithms for fast frequency response • 2001 – next bad dry year but DR fails to take-off and goes “on-hold” even though first customers respond to prices on a Demand Exchange
  6. 6. 6 Our DSM story started in 2007 here in Wellington Technology commercialised as our Smart Grid Terminals Pilot at Wellington Port Coldstore (300kW in SIR) Wellington Port Coldstore 100MW target set to break even Then in 2009
  7. 7. 7 We can now offer more than 200MW to the reserves market Where we are in 2014 We have a diversified portfolio (large industry, commercial and residential hot water)
  8. 8. 8 Our IL is fast, in fact very fast We can respond very fast and very reliably as a portfolio
  9. 9. 9 Our international league table in our EnerNOC world DSM Country Programme Features Weighting Frequency Response New Zealand Canada IL* LSSi Alberta <1s, 1s data, medium [MW] <0.2s, 20ms data, small [MW] Balancing Canada United States Ontario regulation BPA pilot Real-time, small +/-MW] 10min, small [+/-MW] Capacity markets United States Australia PJM WA Complex >2h, very large [MW] >2h, medium [MW] Network DR Australia UK NSW DNOs (low carbon fund) Summer peaking, small [MW] Winter peaking, small [MW] *New Zealand - IL was recognised by PLMA with “Outstanding Program Achievement” award in 2011
  10. 10. 10 10 And what of the future – Thermal Energy Storage
  11. 11. 11 Welcome to our world in Wellington

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