Personality Factors In Sla

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A presentation on the role of personality factors in second language acquistion.

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  • Personality types & language acquisitionMeasuring affective factorsIntrinsic motivation in classroom
  • Trait * - permanent predispositionState * - momentary or situationalDebilitative * - HarmfulFacilitative * - Helpful >POSITIVE FACTOR
  • Personality Factors In Sla

    1. 1. PERSONALITY FACTORS in sla<br />Presented by:<br />Siti Nurfatihah Zakaria<br />Radhiah binti Yunus<br />Hatice Erdogan<br />Sumeye Sahin<br />Jang Lu Rui<br />Li Yu<br />University of Malaya, KL<br />
    2. 2. CONTENTS<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    3. 3. THE AFFECTIVE DOMAIN<br />Bloom and Development of the Affective Domain:<br />Development begins with <br /><ul><li>Receiving
    4. 4. Responding
    5. 5. Valuing. Placing worth
    6. 6. Organization. System of beliefs & Hierarchy
    7. 7. Act in accordance with the value system</li></ul>PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    8. 8. Affective Factors in SLA<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    9. 9. Self-esteem<br />Personal Judgment of worthiness that is expressed in the attitudes that <br /> individuals hold toward themselves. <br />Derived from experiences with themselves and others, and assessments of <br /> the external world.<br />3 levels of self-esteem:<br />General or Global – (overall self-appraisal over time)<br />Situational / Specific – (self-appraisal in particular life situations)<br />Task – (particular tasks within specific situations)<br />Teachers can have a positive and influential effect on:<br />Linguistic performance<br />The Emotional well-being of the students<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    10. 10. Attribution Theory & Self-Efficacy<br /><ul><li>Attribution theory : how people explain their successes</li></ul> and failures<br /><ul><li> 4 explanations:
    11. 11. Internal: Ability; Effort
    12. 12. External: Perceived difficulty of task; Luck</li></ul>* Learners tend to explain; that is to “attribute”<br /><ul><li>Self-efficacy :
    13. 13. a feeling about a capability of carrying out a task
    14. 14. a learner with lower self-efficacy may attribute failure</li></ul> * it is essential for learners to believe in themselves<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    15. 15. Willingness to Communicate<br /><ul><li> An underlying continuum representing the </li></ul> predisposition toward OR away from communicating, <br /> given the choice<br /><ul><li> The intention to initiate communication, given a choice
    16. 16. Related to 2 types of self-confidence
    17. 17. State communicative self confidence
    18. 18. L2 self-confidence
    19. 19. It is also related to self-efficacy </li></ul>PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    20. 20. Inhibition<br /><ul><li>All human beings build sets of defenses to protect the ego</li></ul>(concept of one’s self )<br />Newborns – no concept of own self<br /> Childhood – begin to create it<br /> Adolescence– changes: Physical, Emotional, and <br />Cognitive &gt; defensive inhibitions to <br />protect fragile EGO<br />Adulthood – more building defenses<br /><ul><li> L2 acquisition involves a New Identity
    21. 21. adaptive language ego enables learners to lower inhibitions</li></ul> that may impede success.<br /><ul><li>removal of defenses promote language learning</li></ul>PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    22. 22. Risk Taking<br /><ul><li> Good language learners have the ability </li></ul>to make intelligent guesses<br /><ul><li> Impulsivity –> positive effects in L2
    23. 23. Take the risk of being wrong (bad grade, fail in one exam, </li></ul>punishment, embarrassment)<br /> 1.High Risk-Takers: may need to be “tamed”<br /> 2.Silent Students: Encourage guessing <br /> 3.Value the student as persons for those <br /> risks that they take.<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    24. 24. Anxiety<br /><ul><li>Associated with feelings of frustration, self-doubt, apprehension, worry, or uneasiness.
    25. 25. Levels of Anxiety:</li></ul>Trait * - permanent predisposition<br />State * - momentary or situational<br />Debilitative * - harmful<br />Facilitative * - helpful &gt; POSITIVE FACTOR<br /><ul><li>Differentiate if the anxiety is Trait (permanent) </li></ul>or State (momentary)<br /><ul><li>Promote a Facilitative Anxiety (positive effects)</li></ul>PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    26. 26. Empathy<br /><ul><li> Language > keeps bonds of society
    27. 27. Social transaction - to reach out beyond the self to others </li></ul>&gt; tool: language)<br /><ul><li> Transactional variables – imitation, modeling, empathy, etc
    28. 28. SL: important variables: Empathy and Extroversion
    29. 29. “putting yourself into someone else’s shoes”
    30. 30. Communication requires a sophisticated degree of empathy.
    31. 31. To be able to understand the other person’s affective </li></ul>and cognitive states<br /><ul><li> The need to define empathy cross-culturally
    32. 32. how different cultures express empathy</li></ul>PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    33. 33. Extroversion<br /><ul><li> Stereotype: (gregarious, “life of the party”)
    34. 34. influence teachers’ perception of students.
    35. 35. prejudging on the basis of perceived extroversion.
    36. 36. Extroverts. “Need to receive ego enhancement, self-esteem, </li></ul>and a sense of wholeness from other people.” <br /><ul><li>NEED OTHER people to feel “good”
    37. 37. contrary to stereotypes
    38. 38. Introverts can have an inner strength of character
    39. 39. Cultural factor: improper to speak out
    40. 40. Extroversion may be a symptom of defensive barriers
    41. 41. There is no correlation between extroversion and L2 success</li></ul>PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    42. 42. MOTIVATION<br />Theories of motivation<br /><ul><li>Social context
    43. 43. Community
    44. 44. Social status
    45. 45. Security of groups
    46. 46. Internal, interactive</li></ul> forces in control<br />Constructivist<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    47. 47. Instrumental and Integrative Orientations<br />Instrumental - acquire a language as a means for attaining instrument goals (reading technical material, translation, furthering a career, etc.)<br />Integrative - integrate themselves into the culture of L2 group & become involved in social interchange in that group<br />Assimilative - a more profound need to identify almost exclusively with the target language culture, possibly over a long-term period<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    48. 48. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    49. 49. THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF AFFECT<br />Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)<br />Affectivity and mental/emotional processing &gt; L2<br />Amygdala (temporal lobes of the human brains) – ability to make an appraisal of a stimulus<br />To decide if your perception is pleasant and relevant or unpleasant and painful<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    50. 50. PERSONALITY TYPES &LANGUAGE ACQUISITION<br /><ul><li>The most popular measurement of personality characteristics is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (commonly referred to as the “Myers-Briggs test”)
    51. 51. Four two-dimensional categories:</li></ul>Introversion vs. extroversion<br />Sensing vs. intuition<br />Thinking vs. feeling<br />Judging vs. perceiving<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    52. 52. MEASURING AFFECTIVE FACTORS<br />Validitya) widely validated previously b) do not rely on only one instrument<br />Self-flattery syndromeperceptions are biased &gt; desirable personality type<br />Culturally ethnocentricdifficult to interpret cross-culturally<br /> Paper-and-pencil tests: <br /> asking for self rating by the learner<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    53. 53. INTRINSIC MOTIVATION IN THE CLASSROOM<br /><ul><li>Cannot begin to instruct students </li></ul> without attending to their:<br />Self-efficacy<br />Anxieties<br />Motivations<br />Other personality variables<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    54. 54. INTRINSIC MOTIVATION IN THE CLASSROOM<br /><ul><li>Think about the interplay in the classroom between intrinsic and extrinsic motives (add interesting, learner-centered group/pair activities – give students choices in topics & approaches)
    55. 55. Consider own design of classroom techniques
    56. 56. Consider “10 commandments” for motivating learners:</li></ul>PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    57. 57. Source: Brown, H. Douglas. 2007. Principles of <br />Language Learning and Teaching, 5th Edition. <br />White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. Chapter 6.<br />Created for: PBET 2113 Participants (TESL)<br /> Semester 2, AY 2009-2010<br /> Department of Language & Literacy<br /> Faculty of Education<br /> University of Malaya KL<br />Created by: Siti Nurfatihah Zakaria, <br /> Radhiah binti Yunus, Hatice Erdogan, <br /> Sumeye Sahin, Jang Lu Rui, Li Yu<br />Facilitator: Jessie Grace U. Rubrico, PhD<br /> www.languagelinks.org<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />
    58. 58. THANK YOU…!<br />PBET 2113 Group 4 (TESL) Semester 2 AY 2009-2010, Department of Language & Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, Universiti Malaya KL<br />

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