EEG Maturation - Serial evolution of changes from Birth to Old Age

2,267 views

Published on

This presentation discusses in detail the evolution of the EEG patterns in the human brain, as the brain develops and matures. The sequence of changes as well as the shifting patterns coinciding with Myelination are discussed.

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
0 Comments
7 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,267
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
253
Comments
0
Likes
7
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

EEG Maturation - Serial evolution of changes from Birth to Old Age

  1. 1. EEG Maturation From Infancy to Adolescence
  2. 2. Dendritic Spreading
  3. 3. 1 3 3 2 1 2 3 1
  4. 4. Continuity Interhemispheric synchrony Differentiation of waking and sleeping Posterior basic (alpha) rhythm Slow activity (awake) Temporal theta Occipital theta Fast activity (awake) Low voltage Hyperventilation Intermittent photic stimulation Drowsiness Tracé alternant Spindles Vertex waves and K complexes Positive occipital sharp transients of sleep Slow and fast activity in sleep REM sleep Rhythmical frontal theta activity (6–7/sec) 14 and 6/sec positive spikes Psychomotor variant (marginal abnormality) Sharp waves, spikes
  5. 5. Full Term (36-41 week) Continuity Continuous except for tracé alternant in nonREM (quiet) sleep Interhemispheric synchrony Minor asynchronies still present Differentiation of waking and sleeping Good Posterior basic (alpha) rhythm None Slow activity (awake) Slow (delta), mostly of moderate voltage Temporal theta Occipital theta Fast activity (awake) Disappearing or absent Absent Decreasing ripples, sparse fast activity Low voltage Very low-voltage records are due to severe cerebral pathology; prognosis ominous Hyperventilation Intermittent photic stimulation Not feasible Driving response below 4 flashes/sec may occur, not easily elicited Drowsiness Tracé alternant Undifferentiated Present in non-REM (quiet) sleep
  6. 6. Full Term (36-41 week), contd… Spindles Vertex waves and K complexes None (but scanty ripples) None Positive occipital sharp transients of sleep None Slow and fast activity in sleep Much delta and theta activity, continuous in REM sleep REM sleep Continuous slow activity, REM in EOG (more REM or “active” than non-REM sleep) Rhythmical frontal theta activity (6–7/sec) 14 and 6/sec positive spikes Psychomotor variant (marginal abnormality) Sharp waves, spikes None None None Some minor sharp transients (normal) (abnormal spikes more consistent and prominent)
  7. 7. Infancy (2-12 months) Continuity Interhemispheric synchrony Differentiation of waking and sleeping Continuous No significant asynchrony Good Posterior basic (alpha) rhythm Starting at age 3–4 mos at 4/sec, reaching about 6/sec at 12 mos Slow activity (awake) Temporal theta Occipital theta Fast activity (awake) Low voltage Considerable None None Very moderate Uncommon, usually abnormal Hyperventilation Intermittent photic stimulation Not feasible Improving driving to low flash rates after age 6 mos Around age 6 mos, appearance of rhythmical theta Drowsiness
  8. 8. Infancy (2-12 months), contd… Tracé alternant Disappears in 1st (seldom 2nd) mo Spindles Vertex waves and K complexes Appear after 2nd mo; 12–15/sec, sharp, shifting Appear mainly at 5 mos, fairly large, blunt Positive occipital sharp transients of sleep None Slow and fast activity in sleep Much diffuse 0.75–3/sec activity with posterior maximum; moderate fast activity REM sleep REM portion decreasing; mostly slow activity Rhythmical frontal theta activity (6–7/sec) None 14 and 6/sec positive spikes Psychomotor variant (marginal abnormality) None None Sharp waves, spikes Essential as abnormal phenomena
  9. 9. 9 months
  10. 10. 9 months
  11. 11. 10 months
  12. 12. Early Childhood (12 to 36 months) Continuity Interhemispheric synchrony Differentiation of waking and sleeping Continuous No significant asynchrony Good Posterior basic (alpha) rhythm Rising from 5–6/sec to 8/sec (seldom 9/sec) Considerable None None Mostly moderate Uncommon, usually abnormal Slow activity (awake) Temporal theta Occipital theta Fast activity (awake) Low voltage Hyperventilation Intermittent photic stimulation Drowsiness Tracé alternant Mostly not feasible Often good driving response to low flash rates Marked “hypnagogic” rhythmical theta (4–6/sec) None
  13. 13. Early Childhood (12 to 36 months) contd… Spindles In 2nd yr, sharp and shifting, then symmetrical with vertex maximum Vertex waves and K complexes Large, becoming more pointed Positive occipital sharp transients of sleep Poorly defined Slow and fast activity in sleep Marked posterior maximum of slow activity; often a good deal of fast activity REM sleep Mostly slow, starting to become more desynchronized Rhythmical frontal theta activity (6–7/sec) 14 and 6/sec positive spikes Psychomotor variant (marginal abnormality) Sharp waves, spikes Seldom in 3rd yr of life Rare None Spikes in seizure-free children, mainly occipital (mild abnormalities)
  14. 14. Pre School Age (3 to 5 yrs) Continuity Interhemispheric synchrony Differentiation of waking and sleeping Continuous No significant asynchrony Good Posterior basic (alpha) rhythm Rising from 6–8/sec to 7–9/sec Slow activity (awake) Marked admixture of posterior slow activity (to alpha rhythm) Temporal theta Occipital theta Fast activity (awake) Low voltage None None Mostly moderate Uncommon, usually abnormal Hyperventilation Often marked delta response Intermittent photic stimulation Often good driving response to low flash rates Rhythmical theta gradually vanishing, other types of slow activity predominant Drowsiness Tracé alternant None
  15. 15. Pre School Age (3 to 5 yrs), contd… Spindles Vertex waves and K complexes Typical vertex maximum Large with an increasingly impressive sharp component Positive occipital sharp transients of sleep Slow and fast activity in sleep Poorly defined Predominant slowing but less prominent posterior maximum REM sleep Slow activity with some desynchronization Rhythmical frontal theta activity (6–7/sec) 14 and 6/sec positive spikes Psychomotor variant (marginal abnormality) Sharp waves, spikes May occur, not very common May occur, not very common Probably none Spikes in seizure-free children, mainly occipital, also Rolandic (slight abnormalities)
  16. 16. Older Children (6-12 years) Continuity Interhemispheric synchrony Differentiation of waking and sleeping Continuous No significant asynchrony Good Posterior basic (alpha) rhythm Reaching 10/sec at age 10 yr Slow activity (awake) Varying degree of posterior slow activity mixed with alpha Temporal theta Occipital theta Fast activity (awake) Low voltage None None Mostly moderate Seldom as variant of normalcy Hyperventilation Often marked delta response Intermittent photic stimulation Often good driving response, chiefly at medium flash rates (8–16/sec) Drowsiness Gradual alpha dropout with increasing slow activity None Tracé alternant
  17. 17. Older Children (6-12 years) contd… Spindles Vertex waves and K complexes Typical vertex maximum Large with a prominent sharp component Positive occipital sharp transients of sleep Slow and fast activity in sleep Still poorly defined but gradually evolving REM sleep Rhythmical frontal theta activity (6–7/sec) 14 and 6/sec positive spikes Psychomotor variant (marginal abnormality) Sharp waves, spikes Much diffuse slowing, slightly decreasing voltage Less slowing and increasing desynchronization A bit more common Fairly common Uncommon Spikes in seizure-free children, mainly Rolandic (central-mid-temporal), slight to moderate abnormalities; physiological occipital spikes in congenitally blind children
  18. 18. Adolescents Continuity Interhemispheric synchrony Differentiation of waking and sleeping Continuous No significant asynchrony Good Posterior basic (alpha) rhythm Averaging 10/sec Slow activity (awake) Posterior slow activity diminishing Temporal theta Occipital theta Fast activity (awake) None None Moderate, except for low voltage fast records Occasionally and (at end of teenage period more often) as variant of normalcy Low voltage Hyperventilation Delta responses become less impressive Intermittent photic stimulation Often good driving response, chiefly at medium flash rates Drowsiness Gradual alpha dropout with low-voltage stretches (mainly slow) Tracé alternant None
  19. 19. Adolescents, contd… Spindles Vertex waves and K complexes Typical vertex maximum Not quite as large, sharp component not quite as prominent Positive occipital sharp transients of sleep Often very well developed Slow and fast activity in sleep Much diffuse slowing with further attenuation of voltage REM sleep Rhythmical frontal theta activity (6–7/sec) 14 and 6/sec positive spikes Psychomotor variant (marginal abnormality) Sharp waves, spikes Mature desynchronization A bit more common, declining at end of period Fairly common More common (although relatively rare) Benign Rolandic spikes usually disappear before beginning of this period
  20. 20. Continuity Interhemispheric synchrony Differentiation of waking and sleeping Posterior basic (alpha) rhythm Slow activity (awake) Temporal theta Occipital theta Fast activity (awake) Low voltage Hyperventilation Intermittent photic stimulation Drowsiness Tracé alternant Spindles Vertex waves and K complexes Positive occipital sharp transients of sleep Slow and fast activity in sleep REM sleep Rhythmical frontal theta activity (6–7/sec) 14 and 6/sec positive spikes Psychomotor variant (marginal abnormality) Sharp waves, spikes

×