Appendicitis,pokhrel,bharat

270 views

Published on

Anatomy=> Appendicitis

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
270
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Appendicitis,pokhrel,bharat

  1. 1. APPENDICITIS An inflammation of the vermiform appendix, which is the small, finger­shaped  pouch attached to the beginning of the large intestine on the lower­right side of the  abdomen, caused by the obstruction of the tubular space inside the appendix. The initial  problem is inflammation caused by obstruction of the blood vessels supplying it, and  infection. If the disease is not treated, eventually the appendix will rupture and can lead  to severe conditions such as Peritonitis ,Sepsis and even death. Vermiform (Latin )=> Worm like , Appendix =>> Vermiform Appendix Initially appendix was the site for digestion of cellulose but nowadays, it is n vestigial  organ in human beings and absent in many animals. Beside this, it is considered in playing important role in immune system which helps in  the maturation of B lymphocytes which will help in production of antibodies A (IgA). DEMOGRAPHICS INCIDENCE:  Appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency found in children and  young adults. In Europe and America, the incidence of appendicitis is about 100 per  100,000 patients per year. AGE: In the United States, the highest incidence of appendicitis is found in the age group of 10­ 19. The incidence is highest among males aged 10 to 14, and among females aged 15 to 19.  It is rare in infants and children under the age of 2.  GENDER: Males have a 1.4 times increased presentation of appendicitis compared to women across  all age groups. RACE: Appendicitis rates were 1.5 times higher in white people. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY • acute appendicitis seems to be the end result of a primary obstruction of the  appendiceal lumen. • Once this obstruction occurs, the appendix becomes filled with mucus and  distends, causing increased intraluminal and intramural pressures. • The increase in pressure leads to thrombosis and occlusion of the small vessels. • As bacteria begin to leak out through the dying walls, pus formation occurs within  and around the appendix causing appendiceal rupture leading to peritonitis,  septicemia and eventually death.
  2. 2. CAUSES • Obstruction of the lumen is the dominant causal factor. The obstructing object can  be: *fecalith ; the most common *lymphoid tissue hypertrophy *inspisated barium from previous study *tumors *seeds   ANATOMY OF APPENDIX 1. Part of gastrointestinal  or digestive system                                                                 2.  8 to 10 cm hallow tube  that is closed at one end and is attached at other  end to  cecum    Appendix is located near  the junction of small  intestine and large  intestine in  right lower quadrant of the abdomen  near the right hip done  Appendix position within the abdomen corresponds to a point on the surface known  as Mc Burney’s point.  Mc Burney’s point­ 1/3 of the distance from anterior superior iliac spine to umbilics   The relationship of base  of appendix to cecum  remains constant,  whereas the tip  can be  found in rectrocecal, plevic,  subcecal, perileal  or right precolic position   Found at a point where taniae coli converges on posteromedial wall of cecum   Mesoappendix  peritoneal fold enclosing appendicular vessels It is prolongation of the mesentry of terminal ileum  BLOOD SUPPLY TO THE APPENDIX  Arterial supply to appendix is by means of the appendicular artery, inferior  branch of ileocolic artery of superior mesentirc trunk  Appendicular vein, branch of ileocolic vein drains appendiceacl venous network  into superior mesentric vein and eventually into portal circulation LYMPH SUPPLY  Lymph vessel drains into one or two nodes lying in the mesoappendix, from  there lymph passes to no of mesentric nodes to reach superior mesentric node         NERVE SUPPLY The nerve of appendix are derived from sympathetic and parasympathetic (vagus) nerve  from superior mesenteric plexus  
  3. 3. Cause of Inflammation: Appendicitis is caused by the obstruction of the appendix lumen. This initial  problem is compounded into a cascade of events that lead to the inflammation of  the appendix, the obstruction of the blood vessels supplying it, and infection. Once this obstruction occurs, the appendix subsequently becomes filled with  mucus and distends, causing increased intraluminal and intramural pressures. The increase in pressure leads to thrombosis and occlusion of the small vessels,  and stasis of lymphatic flow. As these clots and blockages progress, the appendix becomes ischemic and then  necrotic. Rarely, spontaneous recovery can occur at this point. As bacteria begin to leak out  through the dying walls, pus forms within and around the appendix (suppuration). The end result of this cascade is appendiceal rupture causing peritonitis, which  may lead to septicemia and eventually death.  FUNCTION  Appendix was viewed as vestigial organ with no known function  Now well recognized that appendix is immunologic organ that actively  participates in secretion of immunoglobulin particulary  immunoglobulin A.  Lymphoid tissue first appears in the appendix approximately 2 week  after birth Also known as housekeeper of good bacteria Treatment Appendicitis can be treated surgically and also non­surgically. Usually surgery is  mainly   focused   in   removal   of   appendix   as   it   can   rupture   easily.   Surgical   removal   of  appendix is based on two types of surgery: Open   appendectomy:  Open   appendectomy   is   the   traditional   method   and   the  standard  treatment  for   appendicitis.   The   surgeon   makes   an  incision   upto   2­4  inches long in  the lower right abdomen, cuts through fat and muscles, pulls the  appendix through the incision, ties it off at its base, and removes it. Care is taken  to   avoid   spilling   purulent   material   (pus)   from   the   appendix   while   it   is   being  removed. The incision is then sutured.               Generally McBurney incision or Rocky Davis incision is taken into consideration.  In McBurney incision the cut is 2­5 cm from the right ilium's anterior superior spine,  through the external oblique to the internal oblique and transversalis muscles. Whereas 
  4. 4. in Rocky Davis incision  the incision is placed transversely (as opposed to obliquely, like  the McBurney’s incision) between the junction of the lower and middle third of a line from  the superior anterior iliac spine to the umbilicus and the lateral border of the rectus   abdominis muscle.                          In  case  of presence  of abscess   the  incision  is   laterally displaced  to allow  retroperitoneal   drainage.   Taeniae   coli   is   converged   at   the   base   of   the   appendix.  Mesoappendix is divided and the appendix is mobilized with ligation of the appendiceal  artery. Laparoscopic   Appendectomy:  The   laparoscopic   (minimally   invasive)   surgical   technique  involves making several tiny cuts in the abdomen and inserting a miniature camera and  surgical instruments. Three incisions are made in the abdomen where ag po   port or nozzle is inserted with carbon dioxide in order to inflate appendix then  through second port laparoscope is inserted, camera projects a magnified image of  the area onto a television monitor which helps guide the surgeons as they remove  the appendix then in third port surgical instrument is inserted and appendix is  removed. Port Placement:  10­mm trocar placed through umbilicus (this port holds camera)  5­mm trocar placed at suprapubic region  5­mm trocar placed at lower left quadrant. Instrument used in Laparoscopy:  Atraumatic grasper  Laparoscopic scissors  Dissector  Endo GIA (or stapler, or endoloop ligature applicator)  Suction/irrigation device  Extraction tube  Extraction bag  Zero­degree scope  3 Trocars (two 5mm and one 10mm)  Alternately, electrocautery tools may also be used.
  5. 5.   Appendix   can   also   be   treated   non   surgically   usually   in   the   early   signs   and  symptoms   of   appendicitis   before   its   rupture.   The   antibiotics   used   according   as  prescribed during this early phase within 4­6 weeks can treat the appendix. These  are numerous types of antibiotics that can be used for the treatment of appendix:  imipenem­cilastatin   metronidazole   ciprofloxacin  ampicillin   clindamycin   levofloxacin   cefoxitin   cefazolin   cefotetan   ampicillin­sulbactam   ertapenem   ticarcillin­clavulanata  Preventions • There is no sure way to prevent appendicitis because it comes on suddenly and the  cause is usually unknown. However, eating a diet that includes fresh vegetables  and fruit  with high fibers may lower your risk of getting appendicitis that makes  stool softer and prevents the chances of wastes to be sticked in the appendix.  • To decrease the rate of rupture, get medical care right away for severe abdominal  pain. 
  6. 6.   Appendix   can   also   be   treated   non   surgically   usually   in   the   early   signs   and  symptoms   of   appendicitis   before   its   rupture.   The   antibiotics   used   according   as  prescribed during this early phase within 4­6 weeks can treat the appendix. These  are numerous types of antibiotics that can be used for the treatment of appendix:  imipenem­cilastatin   metronidazole   ciprofloxacin  ampicillin   clindamycin   levofloxacin   cefoxitin   cefazolin   cefotetan   ampicillin­sulbactam   ertapenem   ticarcillin­clavulanata  Preventions • There is no sure way to prevent appendicitis because it comes on suddenly and the  cause is usually unknown. However, eating a diet that includes fresh vegetables  and fruit  with high fibers may lower your risk of getting appendicitis that makes  stool softer and prevents the chances of wastes to be sticked in the appendix.  • To decrease the rate of rupture, get medical care right away for severe abdominal  pain. 

×