The perils of power point

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This what I would show my students to help them create good power point presentations, but they still weren't very effectively

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  • The following PowerPoint is a class tool that I have wanted to design for a long time but have not had the time. It is for my grade 9 class who DO NOT know how to design proper PowerPoint presentations. Hopefully this will help.
  • You need to establish and largely maintain eye contact with members of the audience, invariably a challenge for those PowerPoint presenters distracted by the need to create a transition between numerous slides. Once you quickly confirm that the proper slide is in place, face the crowd and make your points. Summarize the slide, or expand upon it, or use it as an entry point to provide an important example, but don't read it.
  • You need to establish and largely maintain eye contact with members of the audience, invariably a challenge for those PowerPoint presenters distracted by the need to create a transition between numerous slides. Once you quickly confirm that the proper slide is in place, face the crowd and make your points. Summarize the slide, or expand upon it, or use it as an entry point to provide an important example, but don't read it.
  • With each generation of improved presentation software, the graphical templates become more beautiful: exotic colors, sensuous textures, dazzling effects . . . The problem, of course, is that these gorgeous backdrops frequently jar with the text, and may even render it unreadable. And the matter is exacerbated when the font is ornate and hard to read anyway. For most business and technical presentations, it is best to suppress some of the more spectacular hues and textures. Given so many backgrounds and so many fonts, presenters will frequently make awkward, ugly design choices. Rather, templates and backgrounds should be chosen to reflect the corporate image of the presenter and the topic of the presentation; less is almost always better than more. And in no case should the background design compete for attention with the foreground information.
  • And if there are more than six or seven items in a bulleted list, there is no reason not to make two or three slides.
  • No more than five or six words constituting a point. The generally accepted rule-of-thumb is no more than one slide per minute of presentation time, or 20 slides for a standard 20-minute address.
  • C
  • Overstuffed Charts There is also a sizable number of chart/diagram abusers. Their problems parallel the bullet and text abusers. Chart users will also stuff their images with too much data: finely gradated grids and tic marks, too many symbols or colors in the legend, irrelevant reporting intervals, too many unconsolidated categories of variables, detailed numerical tables to supplement the unclear graphic . . . Business graphics used in slides must make a single clear point, and that point should be evident to the people in the back of the hall. (That's why each chart should have a thematic title that says not only what it's about but what it means. Instead of "Domestic and Foreign Revenues," the title should be "Foreign Revenues Rise to 55% of Total.") But even if the individual charts are well made, there is still the stultifying effect of a long series of bar charts, pie charts, and histograms. I have seen analysts present 50 bar charts in a half hour (each with an unreadable table of numbers at the bottom) and expect their client audience to be impressed and satisfied. Technical experts, especially, must resist the temptation to use the presentation as an information dump.
  • The perils of power point

    1. 1. The Perils of PowerPoint
    2. 2. The Perils of PowerPoint <ul><li>“ It's the most misused technological innovation since the handgun.” </li></ul><ul><li> James Gray – Globe and Mail, Toronto, 2003 </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Power corrupts, but Powerpoint corrupts absolutely.&quot; - Paul Grabowitz, USC Berkeley - 2003 </li></ul>
    3. 3. The Perils of Power Point <ul><li>PowerPoint was designed to enhance speeches and presentations. </li></ul><ul><li> Not replace them! </li></ul>
    4. 4. The Perils of Power Point <ul><li>PowerPoint is an incredible presentation tool that when used wisely can turn a good presentation into a great one! </li></ul><ul><li>If used improperly PowerPoint can just as easily ruin one. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Preparation and Purpose <ul><li>Before beginning your presentation ask yourself three important questions </li></ul><ul><li>1) What do I want to accomplish? </li></ul><ul><li>2) Who is my audience? </li></ul><ul><li>3) How is my presentation being evaluated? </li></ul>
    6. 6. Preparation and Purpose Use the outline function in PowerPoint to organize your ideas. Its easy to use and may help you save time later.
    7. 7. Eye Contact <ul><li>Keeping eye contact with the audience is important in any presentation. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Eye Contact <ul><li>This is Good ! </li></ul>
    9. 9. Eye Contact <ul><li>This is Not ! </li></ul>
    10. 10. Eye Contact <ul><li>Never turn your back on an audience to read your own slides. </li></ul><ul><li>Bring notes or cue cards if you think you may need some help. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Reading the Screen <ul><li>The more reading a presenter does, the less effective the presentation. </li></ul><ul><li>Eye contact with the audience is essential to an effective presentation. </li></ul><ul><li>Why ? </li></ul>
    12. 12. Choosing a background <ul><li>A good presentation should have a consistent background throughout. </li></ul><ul><li>Backgrounds that change can distract the audience from your information. </li></ul><ul><li>The background should not be the focus; the INFORMATION should be. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Busy Backgrounds <ul><li>Dazzling backgrounds and backdrops frequently make the text unreadable and often hard to follow. </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>LIKE THIS !! </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>Or This! </li></ul>
    16. 16. Is the background distracting YOU? Are you following me or are you lost in the MATRIX?
    17. 17. The Trouble with Text <ul><li>Slide presentations are not the place for long winded sentences. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep your slides concise and clear </li></ul><ul><li>If you can’t fit all of your information onto a slide………… MAKE A NEW ONE! </li></ul>
    18. 18. The Trouble with Text <ul><li>Three points to a slide is the rule of thumb. </li></ul><ul><li>Check your spelling ! </li></ul><ul><li>With PowerPoint - “Less is more” </li></ul><ul><li>Short and to the point is good ! </li></ul>
    19. 19. <ul><li>LONG and WORDY IS NOT !!!! </li></ul>
    20. 20. It’s Raining Bullets !! <ul><li>When used properly, bullet charts outline or summarize the remarks of the speaker </li></ul><ul><li>However if used to excess or left on the screen too long bullets can often lose the audience </li></ul>
    21. 21. Fiddling with Fonts <ul><li>Some fonts are great ! </li></ul><ul><li>Some are NOT!!! </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure they are clear and legible. </li></ul><ul><li>SIZE Does Matter ! </li></ul><ul><li>Remember your audience at the back of the room when choosing a font. </li></ul>
    22. 22. Fiddling with Fonts <ul><li>This is a good size font. </li></ul><ul><li>This is NOT!! </li></ul>
    23. 23. A picture is worth a thousand words! <ul><li>A picture or diagram that can help explain a point or concept is a great visual aid. </li></ul><ul><li>Wherever possible try and include pictures that may help explain your presentation. </li></ul>
    24. 24. Transitions and Effects <ul><li>PowerPoint has many effect and transition tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Some of them are great. </li></ul><ul><li>Some of them are not. </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes effects can distract the audience from your information. </li></ul><ul><li>Use them sparingly and responsibly. </li></ul>
    25. 25. Be prepared <ul><li>Have a hard-copy version of your presentation in easy-to-read type available if the technology fails. </li></ul><ul><li>Rehearse often, sometimes delivering your address without referring to your slides. </li></ul>
    26. 26. Now you are ready to present!

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