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Screencasting Tutorial DRN

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Best practices and practical tips

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Screencasting Tutorial DRN

  1. 1. Screencasting tutorials: Best practices and practical tips Kristina Oldenburg | koldenburg@vcc.ca Mari Paz Vera | mavera@vcc.ca
  2. 2.  References & resources: libguides.vcc.ca/screencasting
  3. 3.  Screencasting introduction  What, why, how, and when?  Best practices  From the literature  Demonstration  Screencast-o-matic  Hands-on  Screencast-o-matic
  4. 4. Screencasts: What are they?  Record what’s happening on computer screen  Can record audio, add images, zoom, or edit  Free, cheap, or expensive software available  Upload to YouTube or create a file  Embed on course site  Email to students to respond to questions
  5. 5. Screencasts: What are they?  VCC librarian Bill created a screencast to demo searching: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGHissVdZ ms  Searching for images of tooth decay
  6. 6. Why would you use screencasts?  Increase accessibility to content by providing multiple formats (Oud, 2011)  Audio, visual demo, text
  7. 7. How do students use screencasts?  Point of need  Demo of a library research database  Watched when finding articles for an assignment (Senior nursing students - Baker, 2014)  How to use specific software  Review Excel procedures taught in lecture (Tekinarslan, 2013)
  8. 8. How do students use screencasts?  Lecture summaries & for review (Morris & Chickwa, 2014)  “I watched them several times…. The parts which I found the most difficult to understand I listened to many times.” (Food studies undergraduate, quoted in Morris & Chickwa)
  9. 9. How do students use screencasts?  Some students with dyslexia found them very useful  Pre-lecture: New words & concepts  Post-lecture: Comprehension self-check  Students with dyslexia use study aids more than other students (Embryology students, Evans 2011, p. 62)
  10. 10. Students’ thoughts  Shouldn’t be a replacement for conventional in-person lectures (Food science undergraduate comments reported in Morris & Chickwa, 2014)
  11. 11. Student behaviour  Availability of screencast tutorials didn’t impact lecture attendance (Evans, 2011)
  12. 12. Students’ thoughts  More students preferred online to in- person library instruction  Required session scheduled outside of class time  28.8% prefer classroom  63.5% prefer web tutorial (Silver & Nickel, 2007)
  13. 13.  Flexibly-timed, at-home learning may be easier for students, especially if difficulties with:  Mobility  Concentration  Scheduling (Case & Davidson, 2011)
  14. 14. Screencasts: When & why to use?  Is it faster to record or explain?  Is it the best instructional tool for that situation, and how your students learn?
  15. 15. Think & discuss for a minute:  Is there a situation where you could use screencasts?
  16. 16. Screencasting best practices  Accessible design is good lesson planning (Oud 2011)
  17. 17. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (Oud)  Provide more than one way to access content  Eg Create captions or a script for audio content  Or provide the script as a separate text document (not PDF)
  18. 18. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (Oud)  Make videos keyboard-controllable  Eg don’t insert quizzes that require mouse clicks
  19. 19. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (Oud)  Allow viewers to pause & replay videos if needed  YouTube has this option
  20. 20. Accessible design (Oud 2011)  Highlight main points  Eg arrow, or highlighted cursor  Meaningful graphics  Clear organization  Consistent  Fonts, styles, colours, labels, and sizes, etc.  Simple language  Clear instructions  If requiring viewers to do something (eg quiz)
  21. 21. Best practices: Video length  Keep screencasts short (Morris & Chikwa, 2014)  41% of students preferred 1-3 minute videos  24% liked 3-5 minutes  10% liked 5-10 minutes  No respondents preferred >10 minute videos (Baker, 2012)
  22. 22. Best practices: Audio pacing  Narration pace of about 3 words/second (Baker, 2014)
  23. 23. Best practices: Zooming  Zooming in only when necessary (Baker, 2014)  Eg CanLII video
  24. 24. Best practices: Callouts  Callouts are labels you can add when editing a screencast
  25. 25. Best practices: Callouts  Callouts only when necessary  Some students thought 4 callouts/minute were too many  (Baker, 2014)
  26. 26. Best practices: Visuals  Students asked for larger images & type (Silver & Nickel, 2007)  Easy to see = more accessible  High contrast images & text  Large, clear font (Oud 2011)
  27. 27. Best practices: Audio  Include meaningful voice narration for visual content  Closed captioned for hearing impaired  Option to hide captions  Reading a full transcript can be too much to process for viewers who can also hear
  28. 28. Before recording:  How much time should you spend? Consider:  Simple & clear, with no callouts, might be effective  Is the content likely to change soon?  Does your video have a marketing purpose?  Plot out your screencast in a logical order  Is it worth preparing a script?
  29. 29. Before recording:  Consider the recording size for your needs  Are you recording for HD, or for an iPhone?  If recording audio, get a quality microphone.  They needn’t be expensive, but poor audio can be extremely distracting.  Does your video even need audio?
  30. 30. While recording:  When you record, you can do double or triple takes of a sentence  Easier to cut the takes you don't like  Pause occasionally.  Makes editing, re-recording, or inserting something new easier  The pause means you won’t cut into other content
  31. 31. While recording:  A well-branded title slide for the opening of the video can add a professional quality  Especially true if you’re making a series.
  32. 32.  References & resources: libguides.vcc.ca/screencasting
  33. 33.  Questions?  Now you try! [will provide link to Screencast-o-matic test account]
  34. 34. Selected references Baker, A. (2014). Students’ preferences regarding four characteristics of information literacy screencasts. Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning, 8(1/2), 67-80. doi:10.1080/1533290X.2014.916247 Case, D. E., & Davidson, R. C. (2011). Accessible online learning. New Directions for Student Services, 134, 47-58. Evans, D. J. (2011). Using embryology screencasts: A useful addition to the student learning experience? Anatomical Sciences Education, 4(2), 57-63. Morris, C., & Chikwa, G. (2014). Screencasts: How effective are they and how do students engage with them? Active Learning in Higher Education, 15(1), 25- 37. Oud, J. (2011). Improving screencast accessibility for people with disabilities: Guidelines and techniques. Internet Reference Services Quarterly, 16(3), 129- 144. Silver, S. L., & Nickel, L. T. (2005). Are online tutorials effective? A comparison of online and classroom library instruction methods. Research Strategies, 20(4), 389-396. Tekinarslan, E. (2013). Effects of screencasting on the Turkish undergraduate students’ achievement and knowledge acquisitions in spreadsheet applications.

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