“Love and Rage”       in the Classroom:Exploring Anarchist Theory and            Pedagogy                         Kurt Lov...
WTO Protests in Seattle• Dec 3, 1999• “Battle in Seattle”• Corporate  destruction and  exploitation of  humans and  enviro...
Occupy Wall Street                                                                                      http://occupywalls...
What is Anarchism?   Anarchism is “the philosophy of a new socialorder based on liberty unrestricted by man-madelaw; the t...
What is Anarchism?•   Fully liberated individual that voluntary participates in local, active    communal groups that are ...
“Rage” and theDemonstration of a Just Society• Rage is a daring to change an unjust  society right now, not in a few years...
Promethean &           Epimethean Rage•   Kahn (2009) brings attention to at least two ways of analyzing action•   Prometh...
“Love” and the“Fully Liberated Self”"I want freedom, the right to self-expression,everybodys right to beautiful, radiant t...
“Love” and the    “Fully Liberated Self”•       Love is uncorrupted, pure freedom.    •      Freedom of individuals and   ...
Love/Rage•   Rage (actions that demonstrate the    possibility of removing injustice from a    society right now) is inext...
School & Anarchism•   “The child, however, has no traditions to overcome. Its    mind is not burdened with set ideas, its ...
Some Forms of  Anarchist Education• Unschooling• Deschooling• Freeschooling• Homeschooling
Anarchist Pedagogy in    Mainstream Schools?•   Francisco Ferrer, founder of Modern    School (1913) provided a descriptio...
Anarchist Pedagogy in Mainstream Schools?“Anticoercive and antiauthoritarian, itstressed the dignity and the rights of the...
Anarchist Pedagogy orJust Critical Pedagogy?• Share commonalities with feminist, ecojustice, indigenous,  or queer pedagog...
Food Security• Courses:  Health, Social Studies, English, Math or Science• Overall Student Actions:  1) Imagine possibilit...
Food Security• Student Actions  • As part of their exploration of    “love/rage,” students would    imagine a community fr...
Food Security•   Student Actions    •   Investigate sources of the injustice and        practices that hegemonically perpe...
Food Security•   Student Actions    •   As part of their exploration of both        Promethean and Epimethean “love/      ...
ReferencesAvrich, Paul. 2006. The Modern School Movement: Anarchism and Education in the United States.Oakland, CA: AK Pre...
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Love and Rage: Exploring Anarchist Theory and Pedagogy

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I presented this at the Annual Meeting of the New England Philosophy Education Society on October 22, 2011 at Central Connecticut State University in New Britain, Connecticut.

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Love and Rage: Exploring Anarchist Theory and Pedagogy

  1. 1. “Love and Rage” in the Classroom:Exploring Anarchist Theory and Pedagogy Kurt Love, Ph.D. Annual Meeting of the New England Philosophy of Education Society New Britain, CT October 22, 2011
  2. 2. WTO Protests in Seattle• Dec 3, 1999• “Battle in Seattle”• Corporate destruction and exploitation of humans and environment• Arguments very similar to “Occupy Wall Street”
  3. 3. Occupy Wall Street http://occupywallst.org/• Started on Sep 17, 2011• 1500 protests, 82 countries, 100 US cities on Oct 15• Protesting the unchecked power of the top 1%• Claims to be a post- political movement “For the disinherited are not content to forever starve in the midst of plenty, and the exploited are beginning to cry out against their cruel bondage.” (27) - Peter Berkman 2001. "Violence and Anarchism." Pp. 26-29 in Anarchy! An Anthology of Emma Goldmans Mother Earth. Edited by Peter Glassgold. Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint.
  4. 4. What is Anarchism? Anarchism is “the philosophy of a new socialorder based on liberty unrestricted by man-madelaw; the theory that all forms of government rest onviolence, and are therefore wrong and harmful, aswell as unnecessary.” (Goldman, 1969, p. 50) Emma Goldman
  5. 5. What is Anarchism?• Fully liberated individual that voluntary participates in local, active communal groups that are fully democratic in operation• Participation is completely voluntary, so if an individual feels restricted s/he may freely leave the collective whenever s/he chooses.• Types of anarchism • mutualism (bottom-up, small communes and workers cooperatives eventually forming larger federations), • collectivist anarchism or anarcho-communism (workers in small voluntary groups have all material goods necessary from a common source), • individualist anarchism (focusing less on a common group and more on the freedom of the individual) (Jacker 1968), and • anarcho-syndicalism (use of federated, decentralized labor councils as the primary social unit that are involved in all economic and social institutions) (Chomsky 2005; Rocker 1989)
  6. 6. “Rage” and theDemonstration of a Just Society• Rage is a daring to change an unjust society right now, not in a few years, a couple of decades, or when a conscious evolution occurs. It is a demonstration that a new reality is present right now.• Rage is anger, action, and love combined.• Rage is often seen as ugly, unnecessary, juvenile, and irrational; yet, it is rooted in nurturing beauty, sustainability, intergenerational wisdom, and long-term health for the Earth and its “guests.”
  7. 7. Promethean & Epimethean Rage• Kahn (2009) brings attention to at least two ways of analyzing action• Prometheus (“forethought”), suffered from the lack of afterthought is in eternal punishment for his activism • Direct action, protest, civil disobedience• Epimetheus (“afterthought”), gave freely without condition, demonstrated a level of compassion and empathetic action that could also be reflective of anarchism. • Rage in the sense of the afterthought might be seen less as about anger or proactive (or reactive) actions, but more about cultivating interconnections within community grounded in a passion for nurturance, sustainability, and peace. To give unconditionally creates no hierarchy, elitism, or domination of one group over another. • An Epimethean rage might be one that enacts nurturence and reciprocity that can topple power-driven, top-heavy, hierarchical bureaucracies that ultimately produce widespread oppression.
  8. 8. “Love” and the“Fully Liberated Self”"I want freedom, the right to self-expression,everybodys right to beautiful, radiant things."- Emma Goldman (1931) If I cant dance, its not my revolution! - Emma Goldman (1931)
  9. 9. “Love” and the “Fully Liberated Self”• Love is uncorrupted, pure freedom. • Freedom of individuals and freedom of small communal, mutualistic groups because to live in an anarchistic society requires that we deeply love one another while honoring our differences, approaches, ways of living, cultures, spiritualities, and sexualities.• We are evolving towards a state of both freedom and peaceful mutualism, and love is located, if not defined, in the practices of mutualism and freedom of the individual.
  10. 10. Love/Rage• Rage (actions that demonstrate the possibility of removing injustice from a society right now) is inextricably coupled with love (the interwoven fully liberated self and community).• Love/rage is the collective movement of anarchy.• Love/rage helps us see ourselves as imprisoned, something we are quick to ignore because it is so painful to acknowledge, as well as the causes and sources of that imprisonment.• Love/rage happens along a continuum of Promethean and Epimethean paths.• Love/rage is a key to unlock our consciousness that empowers us to say, “We are now free!”
  11. 11. School & Anarchism• “The child, however, has no traditions to overcome. Its mind is not burdened with set ideas, its heart has not grown cold with class and caste distinctions. The child is to the teacher what clay is to the sculptor. Whether the world will receive a work of art or a wretched imitation, depends to a large extent on the creative power of the teacher.” (Goldman, 1969, p.148)• In 1908, Francisco Ferrer (2001) wrote, “Governments have ever been careful to hold a high hand over the education of the people. They know better than anyone else, that their power is based almost entirely on the school. Hence, they monopolize it more and more” (258).
  12. 12. Some Forms of Anarchist Education• Unschooling• Deschooling• Freeschooling• Homeschooling
  13. 13. Anarchist Pedagogy in Mainstream Schools?• Francisco Ferrer, founder of Modern School (1913) provided a description: • The most effective protest and the most promising form of revolutionary action consist in giving the oppressed, the disinherited, and all who are conscious of a demand for justice, as much truth as they can receive, trusting that it will direct their energies in the great work of the regeneration of society. (20)
  14. 14. Anarchist Pedagogy in Mainstream Schools?“Anticoercive and antiauthoritarian, itstressed the dignity and the rights of thechild, encouraging warmth, love, andaffection in place of conformity andregimentation. Among the key words ofvocabulary were “freedom,”“spontaneity,” “creativity,”“individuality,” and “self-realization.” (Avrich 2006, 7)
  15. 15. Anarchist Pedagogy orJust Critical Pedagogy?• Share commonalities with feminist, ecojustice, indigenous, or queer pedagogies• The signifying difference would be that anarchist educators would contextualize these arguments in a social, cultural, ecological, and spiritual context of total liberation and anti-state, anti-authoritarian perspectives and in a love/ rage duality.• An anarchist pedagogy would not only bring in for consideration, but would emphasize a wide range of Promethean through Epimethean actions driven by the interwoven duality of love/rage that challenge the existence of a hierarchical government, a formal schooling process, and any centralized form of controlling education.
  16. 16. Food Security• Courses: Health, Social Studies, English, Math or Science• Overall Student Actions: 1) Imagine possibilities, 2) Investigate sources of injustice, and 3) Connect those who suffer from food inaccessibility with clean food sources
  17. 17. Food Security• Student Actions • As part of their exploration of “love/rage,” students would imagine a community free of inaccessibility to food and actions they can take to make that a reality.
  18. 18. Food Security• Student Actions • Investigate sources of the injustice and practices that hegemonically perpetuate insecurity such as: • market-based thinking, hyper- consumerism in relationship to rates of obesity, the common practice of for- profit food corporations relying upon and producing addictive mindsets and practices via advertising and inclusion of additive chemicals like caffeine (especially those that create addiction), and state-sponsored agricultural funding and subsidies including practices with the widespread use of chemicals like high-fructose corn syrup.
  19. 19. Food Security• Student Actions • As part of their exploration of both Promethean and Epimethean “love/ rage,” students might seek out sources of food waste that are acceptable for “redistribution” and make that food immediately available to those who need it (Promethean) similar to a Food Not Bombs process by simply making the food and giving it away on the streets of their community. • They might also work with community members to create community gardens (Epimethean) and make sure that there are ways to support all who need it have access to seeds and soil.
  20. 20. ReferencesAvrich, Paul. 2006. The Modern School Movement: Anarchism and Education in the United States.Oakland, CA: AK Press.Berkman, Alexander. 2001. "Violence and Anarchism." Pp. 26-29 in Anarchy! An Anthology ofEmma Goldmans Mother Earth. Edited by Peter Glassgold. Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint.Esteva, Gustavo. 2007. "Reclaiming Our Freedom to Learn." Yes! Retrieved September 29, 2011,from http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/liberate-your-space/reclaiming-our-freedom-to-learn .Ferrer-Guardia, Francisco. 1913. The Origin and Ideals of the Modern School. Trans. JosephMcCabe. New York, NY: G. P. Putnams Sons/Knickerbocker Press.Ferrer, Franciso. 2001. "L École Rénovée." Pp.257-264 in Anarchy! An Anthology of EmmaGoldmans Mother Earth. Edited by Peter Glassgold. Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint.Jacker, Corinne.1968. The Black Flag of Anarchy: Antistatism in the United States. New York, NY:Charles Scribners Sons.Kahn, Richard. 2009. "Critical Pedagogy Taking the Illich Turn." The International Journal of IllichStudies1:37-49. Retrieved September 29, 2011, from http://ivan-illich.org/journal/index.php/IJIS/article/view/7/9 .

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