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Feminist Pedagogies

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Feminist Pedagogies

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Feminist Pedagogies

  1. 1. Feminist Pedagogies Kurt Love, Ph.D. Central Connecticut State University
  2. 2. Major Feminist Critiques of Education ✴ Feminist Theory ✴ History of patriarchy ✴ Objectivity ✴ Objectification of nature ✴ Isolationism, individualism ✴ Embedded in language ✴ Classroom practices
  3. 3. A LITTLE HISTORY... First Wave Feminism - Late 1800’s in U.S. and Western Europe, focused on women’s suffrage and how men control women in the home. Second Wave Feminism - 1960’s-1970’s in U.S. and Western Europe, focused on “body politics,” what’s private is public/political, women’s movement Backlash - During the 1980’s in the U.S., strong patriarchal figures (Ronald Reagan, Rush Limbaugh, Rambo, Rocky, and Andrew “Dice” Clay) gained popularity and provided a discourse against the civil rights movements of the previous twenty years.
  4. 4. A LITTLE HISTORY... Third Wave Feminism - 1990’s - Present globally, focused on intersectional analysis of race, gender, class, and geopolitical location Critique: These “waves” are from the perspective of White, middle class women in the U.S. and in Western Europe. Black females in the U.S. argued that they have been working on all three “waves” since the late 1800’s. Furthermore, White females often instituted racist conditions against Black women during the first and second waves.
  5. 5. DIFFERENT LEVELS OF PATRIARCHY Daily Living - Most visible (Car dealerships, service people, church, pay scales, etc.) Research & Construction of Knowledge - Less Visible (Carol Gilligan, heart attacks, Puerto Rico) Social Construction of Reality - Least Visible (Language, scientific philosophy, worldviews, ideologies)
  6. 6. WHERE ARE WE? Sandra Harding’s “Strong Objectivity” Bring in as many different peoples into scientific research which can strengthen “objectivity.” Donna Haraway’s “Situated Knowledge” Researchers need to bring in their positions(i.e. race, history, culture, gender, location, class, etc.) into their work because knowledge is always constructed through who we are.
  7. 7. STANDPOINT THEORY The acknowledgement that we can never be neutrally located. With that, we need to always be aware of how social, historical, and cultural processes are constructing us, our thoughts, and our knowledge production processes such as research. Our knowledge is always produced from someone’s or a group’s “standpoint.”
  8. 8. INTERSECTIONALITY Feminist theorists have provided the most rigorous forms of analysis because, especially since the inception of “third wave” feminism, gender is not seen as separate from race, class, religion, globalization, capitialism, etc. Intersectionality is a lens of analysis that shows how different identities articulate with one another, not separately from one another.
  9. 9. Classroom Practices Women’s studies professors, not education professors (initially) Creating a supportive classroom environment where student voice was incorporated Exploring “care” Cooperative learning experiences “Other” ways of knowing
  10. 10. Cooperative Learning Moving away from a top-down lecture At the college level: Small group discussions Papers that incorporated personal living experiences and reflective thinking
  11. 11. Cooperative Learning At the K-12 setting: Think-pair-share & Think- pair-square Student voice Mix-freeze-share Student-centered classroom Interview Small group discussion Round Robin Reflective writing Roundtable & Rallytable Jigsaw Mind-mapping
  12. 12. Daring to “Care” Nel Noddings states that classroom spaces become sites of working on issues and concerns that students care about Learning (in the school setting) becomes a process that students can genuinely care about Students support and encourage one another in their learning experiences
  13. 13. Feminist Classroom Space bell hooks states that she does not intend to create a classroom space that is comfortable. It is turbulent, frank, (fiery) and full of emotional disequilibrium That is the space that allows for us to get to what is real, honest, and authentic It should be done with great care and support, though.
  14. 14. Ways of Knowing What are the different ways that we come to know information and construct knowledge? Observation Relationships Measurement Experience Historically Power Relations Intuition Intergenerationally Media Spiritually Emotionally Senses
  15. 15. The Earth Western Science: The Earth is a collection of materials, minerals, and chemicals in systems. Which “ways of knowing” construct this knowledge? Which “ways of knowing” are excluded? What is missing from this description of the Earth?
  16. 16. Ways of Knowing Western Science: The Earth is a collection of materials, minerals, and chemicals in systems. Observation Relationships Measurement Experience Historically Power Relations Intuition Intergenerationally Media Spiritually Emotionally Senses
  17. 17. The Earth Indigenous Science: The Earth is an integrated, interdependent, interconnected, nurturing and spiritual being that reciprocates life through balance and sustainability. Which “ways of knowing” construct this knowledge? Which “ways of knowing” are excluded? What is missing from this description of the Earth?
  18. 18. Ways of Knowing Indigenous Science: The Earth is an integrated, interdependent, interconnected, nurturing and spiritual being that reciprocates life through balance and sustainability. Observation Relationships Measurement Experience Historically Power Relations Intuition Intergenerationally Media Spiritually Emotionally Senses

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