Aesthetic Pedagogy                  Kurt Love, Ph.D.Central Connecticut State University
“Rickshaw”  Banksy
“Rickshaw”                  Banksy                                    Modern DayGlobalization    Racism Classism          ...
“Napalm” Banksy
Critical Aesthetic Pedagogy & Empowerment   By exposing students to participatory encounters   with artworks that possess ...
Art as a “Portal”The “Portal”  Art serves as a medium for deeper  analysis  Art asks us to make deeper  connections about ...
Art as a PortalAt the very least, participatoryinvolvement with the manyforms of art can enable us tosee more in our exper...
Art as a Portal Into Self, Soul & Society   Many nature-based cultures have no word for art or   artist because producing ...
Using Art as a Teaching Method Steps:   What do you see?   What relationships exist among the   elements of the artwork?  ...
Various PortalsMythsFine ArtsPerforming ArtsPoetry
Art as MythMyths are oral art, as opposed to visual art“A myth is, in a sense, the very truest of stories, astory that rev...
Art as MythMyths are “stories”acting as banks that storecultural values, originsof thinking, rituals, andtraditions that m...
Using Fine Art as a Portal                       “War By                      Numbers”                       Shepard      ...
Alex Grey
“Dying”Alex Grey
“Pregnancy” Alex Grey
Andy Goldsworthy
“Guernica”  Picasso
“Guernica”  Picasso
“Starry Night”   Van Gogh
“Girl Before a Mirror”        Picasso
“Girl Before a Mirror”        PicassoLong hours she satlooking in themirror, trying todiscover the secretof the ugliness, ...
“Spheres I”M.C. Escher’s
“Trash People”  HA Schult
“Spiral Jetty”Robert Smithson
“Tree of Hope” Frida Kahlo
CREATE A MURAL
CREATE ECO-ART
GRAFFITI WALLS & STREET ART
GRAFFITI WALLS & STREET ART
MAKE PUBLIC ART
BUST ADVERTISEMENTS
PERFORMING ARTSAS TEACHING METHODS
THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED  Image Theatre, Forum Theater, Newspaper Theater, Rainbow of Desire, Historical  Theater, Invisib...
THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED:     IMAGE THEATER•   Frozen image, no sound•   “Spectactors” analyze what they    see and provid...
THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED:   NEWSPAPER THEATER• Reenacting           a situation that was reported in the newspaper• Purpos...
THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED:         FORUM THEATER•   Story is one that is born out of a real    community issue•   Forum The...
THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED:        INVISIBLE THEATER• Actors      do something in    community, but are not    initially see...
POETRY SLAM http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTnxJdxhU7o
CREATE AND PERFORM PLAYS THAT RESHAPE STORIES
USE PUPPETS FOR PERFORMANCE
USE MASKS AS WAYS TO REVEAL HIDDEN       THOUGHT & EMOTION
MAKE A DOCUMENTARY
MAKE A DOCUMENTARY
REFERENCESGreene, M. (1995). Releasing the imagination. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Medina, Y. (2006). Critical aesthetic p...
Critical Aesthetic Pedagogy2012
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Critical Aesthetic Pedagogy2012

  1. 1. Aesthetic Pedagogy Kurt Love, Ph.D.Central Connecticut State University
  2. 2. “Rickshaw” Banksy
  3. 3. “Rickshaw” Banksy Modern DayGlobalization Racism Classism Slavery“Othering” ModernityFirst World & Colonization“Third World” Tourism & Business Exploitation Mindsets Relationships with Global Consumerism
  4. 4. “Napalm” Banksy
  5. 5. Critical Aesthetic Pedagogy & Empowerment By exposing students to participatory encounters with artworks that possess certain qualities that encourage the sharing of experiences and the recognition of common sources of oppression, educators can create a sense of empowerment that will prepare students to enable social justice. (Medina, 2006) Students can explore oppressions, privilege, relationships & tensions that exist in community so that they can be empowered to create change.
  6. 6. Art as a “Portal”The “Portal” Art serves as a medium for deeper analysis Art asks us to make deeper connections about ourselves
  7. 7. Art as a PortalAt the very least, participatoryinvolvement with the manyforms of art can enable us tosee more in our experience, tohear more on normally unheardfrequencies, to becomeconscious of what dailyroutines have obscured, whathabit and convention havesuppressed. (Greene, 1995, p.123) 1917 -
  8. 8. Art as a Portal Into Self, Soul & Society Many nature-based cultures have no word for art or artist because producing what we call art is simply part of being human. True art has nothing to do with impressing or entertaining others with pleasant or stunning creations; it’s about carrying what is hidden in the soul as a gift to others. However we embody our souls in the world, that is our art. Soul expression...(Plotkin, 2003, p. 191)
  9. 9. Using Art as a Teaching Method Steps: What do you see? What relationships exist among the elements of the artwork? What do you think it means?
  10. 10. Various PortalsMythsFine ArtsPerforming ArtsPoetry
  11. 11. Art as MythMyths are oral art, as opposed to visual art“A myth is, in a sense, the very truest of stories, astory that reveals universal qualities of that humancondition, of the world, and the deeper meanings andpossibilities of our lives.” (Plotkin, 2003, p. 204)Myths contain “layers upon layers of significance,like bands of rock in a canyon wall, each stratumholding and hiding untold treasures and mysteries.We become aware of the different layers only as wedevelop spiritually.” (Plotkin, 2003, p. 205)
  12. 12. Art as MythMyths are “stories”acting as banks that storecultural values, originsof thinking, rituals, andtraditions that mightotherwise be lost.Connection to ecojusticepedagogy because ofhow myths can help toquestion dominant andprivileged mindsets. http://prezi.com/lsncossgvb3c/nine-worlds/
  13. 13. Using Fine Art as a Portal “War By Numbers” Shepard Fairey
  14. 14. Alex Grey
  15. 15. “Dying”Alex Grey
  16. 16. “Pregnancy” Alex Grey
  17. 17. Andy Goldsworthy
  18. 18. “Guernica” Picasso
  19. 19. “Guernica” Picasso
  20. 20. “Starry Night” Van Gogh
  21. 21. “Girl Before a Mirror” Picasso
  22. 22. “Girl Before a Mirror” PicassoLong hours she satlooking in themirror, trying todiscover the secretof the ugliness, theugliness that madeher ignored ordespised at school,by teachers andclassmates alike.Bluest Eyeby Toni Morrison
  23. 23. “Spheres I”M.C. Escher’s
  24. 24. “Trash People” HA Schult
  25. 25. “Spiral Jetty”Robert Smithson
  26. 26. “Tree of Hope” Frida Kahlo
  27. 27. CREATE A MURAL
  28. 28. CREATE ECO-ART
  29. 29. GRAFFITI WALLS & STREET ART
  30. 30. GRAFFITI WALLS & STREET ART
  31. 31. MAKE PUBLIC ART
  32. 32. BUST ADVERTISEMENTS
  33. 33. PERFORMING ARTSAS TEACHING METHODS
  34. 34. THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED Image Theatre, Forum Theater, Newspaper Theater, Rainbow of Desire, Historical Theater, Invisible Theater
  35. 35. THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED: IMAGE THEATER• Frozen image, no sound• “Spectactors” analyze what they see and provide their interpretations• Mime adds movement with no sound• Rainbow of Desire: Spectactors provide words for the actors that might explain their thinking
  36. 36. THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED: NEWSPAPER THEATER• Reenacting a situation that was reported in the newspaper• Purpose is to understand the injustice and to work with it in a safe way to promote understanding, compassion, and possible actions/ decisions that might work
  37. 37. THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED: FORUM THEATER• Story is one that is born out of a real community issue• Forum Theater is “rehearsal for life”• Scenes must be accurate depictions of an injustice in community. Spectactors can stop the scene if something seems exaggerated or unreal.• Spectactors yell “FREEZE” when they see an injustice and replace the protagonist in order to see if s/he can stop the antagonist’s actions.• A “joker” (teacher) asks questions of the spectactors
  38. 38. THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED: INVISIBLE THEATER• Actors do something in community, but are not initially seen as actors.• Purpose is to raise awareness of how we respond to injustice when it happens right in front of us• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dvzj8wyZ9PI Augusto Boal 1931-2009
  39. 39. POETRY SLAM http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTnxJdxhU7o
  40. 40. CREATE AND PERFORM PLAYS THAT RESHAPE STORIES
  41. 41. USE PUPPETS FOR PERFORMANCE
  42. 42. USE MASKS AS WAYS TO REVEAL HIDDEN THOUGHT & EMOTION
  43. 43. MAKE A DOCUMENTARY
  44. 44. MAKE A DOCUMENTARY
  45. 45. REFERENCESGreene, M. (1995). Releasing the imagination. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Medina, Y. (2006). Critical aesthetic pedagogy: Toward a theory of self and social understanding. Unpublished Dissertation, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greenboro, NC.Plotkin, B. (2003). Soulcraft: Crossing into the mysteries of nature and psyche. Novato, CA: New World Library.

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