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Reproductive Issues in Mexico Reproductive Justice and Women's Rights in Mexico
Shortcomings of Legislature in these provinces:   <ul><li>Morelos </li></ul><ul><li>Baja California </li></ul><ul><li>Camp...
A Secular State?  <ul><li>The Church hierarchy in Mexico and the language used in the anti-abortion legislation demonstrat...
Statistics and Logistics <ul><li>It is estimated that the number of abortions in Mexico increased from 553,000 a year to 8...
How are Real Life Women Affected by this law? <ul><li>In Mexico, these abortions are often done with unsterile instruments...
Entitlement to Reproductive Justice <ul><li>So what exactly  is  reproductive justice? </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reproduct...
Barriers to Women <ul><li>Societal barriers like racism and sexism are the real culprits to the erosion of self-determinat...
A Lack of Recognition <ul><li>Mexico’s total population exceeds ninety two million people.  Of those, over half are women ...
Cause & Effect <ul><li>The use of contraception, while on the rise, still has much to gain in terms of popularity and acce...
Reality of Obtaining an Abortion is Harsh <ul><li>Doctors, who are punished for performing abortions and therefore usually...
Real Life Story <ul><li>Consider the case of Paulina, fourteen, from Mexico D. F.  Raped by a burglar in 2001, it was lega...
Consequences <ul><li>Of the 1.7 million abortions per year in Mexico, 850 thousand are induced.  Statistics further show t...
Problems with Mexican Health Care System  <ul><li>The Mexican health care system is sub-divided into many sectors includin...
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Women's Rights, Reproductive Rights in Mexico

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Women's Rights, Reproductive Rights in Mexico

  1. 1. Reproductive Issues in Mexico Reproductive Justice and Women's Rights in Mexico
  2. 2. Shortcomings of Legislature in these provinces: <ul><li>Morelos </li></ul><ul><li>Baja California </li></ul><ul><li>Campeche </li></ul><ul><li>Colima </li></ul><ul><li>Durango </li></ul><ul><li>Guanajuato </li></ul><ul><li>Jalisco </li></ul><ul><li>Nayarit </li></ul><ul><li>Oaxaca </li></ul><ul><li>Puebla </li></ul><ul><li>Quintana Roo </li></ul><ul><li>Queretaro </li></ul><ul><li>San Luis Potosi </li></ul><ul><li>Sonora </li></ul><ul><li>Yucatan </li></ul><ul><li>Veracruz </li></ul>
  3. 3. A Secular State? <ul><li>The Church hierarchy in Mexico and the language used in the anti-abortion legislation demonstrate that the Catholic Church has played a major role in recent legislation. For the following reasons: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pope Benedict wrote a letter to Mexican bishops encouraging them to oppose the law allowing abortion following the 2007 Mexico City ruling. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Church leaders in Mexico threatened to excommunicate politicians who supported the law. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ They will get the penalty of excommunication. It’s not revenge, it’s just what happens in the case of serious since,” said the Archbishop of Acapulco. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pan Governor Emilio Gonzalez Marquez recently filed an appeal to prevent from aborting for any reason, including rape. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Statistics and Logistics <ul><li>It is estimated that the number of abortions in Mexico increased from 553,000 a year to 875,000 a year between 1990 and 2006. </li></ul><ul><li>To obtain a legal abortion in most states, you must file a request with the government, proving that you can legally receive one-usually the reason must be rape. </li></ul><ul><li>Dr. Olivia Ballesteros a gynecologist at a Mexico City clinic of a non profit organization Mexfam, dismissed the possibility of getting a legal abortion before 2007 explaining the bureaucracy was nearly impossible to overcome, and that it and when a report was filed, the baby was already born. </li></ul>
  5. 5. How are Real Life Women Affected by this law? <ul><li>In Mexico, these abortions are often done with unsterile instruments and in dangerous places, by midwives general practitioners or people posing as doctors. </li></ul><ul><li>The result is that as a gynecologist in Mexico City before the 2007 ruling, Dr. Pina saw a high number of patients for complications for abortions. </li></ul><ul><li>63% of all hospitalizations for pregnancy-related problems are due to complications (according to the Mexican Institute for Social Security) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Entitlement to Reproductive Justice <ul><li>So what exactly is reproductive justice? </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reproductive justice is a fundamental right. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The right to be informed, the right to have control over their reproductive lives and to be supported in their decisions to have a child, to not have a child, or to raise the children they have. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Barriers to Women <ul><li>Societal barriers like racism and sexism are the real culprits to the erosion of self-determination and opportunity for women. The undercurrent racism that can be noticed in the “Work offered’ ads (newspapers), and billboards, are constant reminders of these stereotypes Mexican society is perpetuating. </li></ul>
  8. 8. A Lack of Recognition <ul><li>Mexico’s total population exceeds ninety two million people. Of those, over half are women and fifteen percent of those women are illiterate. It is amazing then, in a country where women number more than half the inhabitants, that services, education, employment and human rights, where concerned with the welfare of women, are at their lowest level. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Cause & Effect <ul><li>The use of contraception, while on the rise, still has much to gain in terms of popularity and acceptance in Mexico. If women are aware of contraception, it is unlikely the men in their lives – husbands, politicians, doctors, lawyers, church officials – will allow the use of it. </li></ul><ul><li>In fact, during his 1999 visit, the Pope, who stated prior to his visit his belief that defense of human dignity is essential for world peace - he called it the foundation, did not discuss the failure of Mexico to meet basic human rights for women in the area of reproductive health. It is such dismissal and disregard that allows the continuing degradation, inequality, and deaths of women. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Reality of Obtaining an Abortion is Harsh <ul><li>Doctors, who are punished for performing abortions and therefore usually abstain from them, are not trained. Those that have some training frequently do not keep up to date with new medical findings. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Real Life Story <ul><li>Consider the case of Paulina, fourteen, from Mexico D. F. Raped by a burglar in 2001, it was legal for her to receive an abortion. Supported by her mother Maria Elena, she went to the hospital for the procedure. Once admitted, the hospital allowed anti-abortion extremists to see her and show her graphic videos of abortions. This did not stop Paulina from moving forward however, the doctors at the hospital conscientiously objected to performing the procedure. Paulina and Maria Elena appealed to the Attorney General to enforce the law and instead, he took them to see a Catholic priest. The priest advised Paulina, a 14 year-old who had been raped and then became pregnant, that abortion was a sin. No mention was made of the sin that had been visited upon Paulina through the rape and subsequent pregnancy. Paulina pressed on and the Attorney General eventually signed an order for the abortion. Once again Paulina and Maria Elena went to the hospital, order in hand. Once again, they were dissuaded by staffers from the abortion. The hospital director over-emphasized the risks of the procedure and this time it worked. Paulina did not have the abortion and carried her child to term. Following her failed abortion attempts, two Mexican women’s rights groups filed lawsuits on her behalf. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Consequences <ul><li>Of the 1.7 million abortions per year in Mexico, 850 thousand are induced. Statistics further show that abortion is between the third or fourth cause of death and between the second to fourth causes of hospitalization in Mexico. </li></ul><ul><li>While abortion is illegal in Mexico, the threat of prosecution is usually only a threat. But if one is caught, it is a lifelong stigma. </li></ul><ul><li>A research study in 1992 in Mexico City determined that of 600 women inmates in the Tepepan jail, only one had been convicted of provoking an abortion. She was 81 years old, nearly blind, and an alternative health care worker. (Martinez) </li></ul><ul><li>As this case illustrates, there is minimal prosecution of the offenders. In fact, corruption ensures little prosecution. A woman pays the equivalent of approximately 1,000 U.S. dollars to secure her release from any charges that are brought (it is called the amparo , that is the Mexican habeas corpus law). It is no wonder abortion, while illegal, continues to flourish outside the mainstream of health care providers and procedures. Even the government speaks from both sides of its mouth, “Abortion is illegal, a sin, and punishable; pay up!” </li></ul>
  13. 13. Problems with Mexican Health Care System <ul><li>The Mexican health care system is sub-divided into many sectors including the salaried sector (social security), state sector (open to all), and the private sector consisting of many layers. All of these factions serve to create confusion, under-coverage and a lack of resources. </li></ul>

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