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Blended Learning: (Re)Thinking and (Re)Designing

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Slides from workshop with 2015 FAMU faculty learning communities

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Blended Learning: (Re)Thinking and (Re)Designing

  1. 1. Blended Learning: (Re)Thinking & (Re)Designing Dr. Kelvin Thompson University of Central Florida @kthompso #blendthinkdesign This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Sharealike 3.0 Unported License. Portions of this work are the intellectual property of others and are attributed appropriately in context.
  2. 2. http://bit.ly/thompson_famu2015
  3. 3. Shhhhh!byCJS*64onFlickrCCBY-ND2.0License https://www.flickr.com/photos/16210667@N02/14380256019
  4. 4. 2007 Disney Weekends #1: Chewbacca by starwarsblog on Flickr CC BY 2.0 License http://www.flickr.com/photos/starwarsblog/631778627
  5. 5. Star Wars Weekends 2011-Last Day by Gordon Tarpley on Flickr CC BY 2.0 License http://www.flickr.com/photos/gordontarpley/5827276713
  6. 6. DIY light-saber, Tomorrowland, Disneyland, CA, USA 1.JPG by Corey Doctorow on Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0 License http://www.flickr.com/photos/doctorow/4536623149
  7. 7. THINKING ABOUT BLENDED LEARNING
  8. 8. From http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com
  9. 9. Pair and Share • Partner-up with one or more colleagues • Share what you would like to accomplish in your blended learning course(s) after today’s workshop • Refer your colleagues to any helpful resources you know
  10. 10. Multiple Approaches Tech Enabled F2F + Online Web Enhanced Flip Class Reduced Seat Time Mandated “Recipes” “Blended”
  11. 11. Networked Technologies Digital Information Abundance Human Interaction
  12. 12. Innovations Disruptive • Technology-enabled • New definition of “good” • Different services/products to new customers • Example: Electric car Sustaining • Technology-enabled • Same definition of “good” • Better services/products to best customers • Example: Hybrid car Christensen, C., Horn, M., and Staker, H. (2013). Is K–12 blended learning disruptive? An introduction of the theory of hybrids. San Francisco: Christensen Institute. Available online http://www.christenseninstitute.org/publications/hybrids
  13. 13. Characteristics of “Hybrids”  Sustaining Disruption 1. Includes both the old and new technology. 2. Targets existing customers. 3. Performance hurdle required to delight existing customers is quite high. Hybrid must do the job at least as well as the incumbent product on its own, as judged by the original definition of performance. 4. Tends to be less “foolproof ” than a disruptive innovation. Christensen, C., Horn, M., and Staker, H. (2013). Is K–12 blended learning disruptive? An introduction of the theory of hybrids. San Francisco: Christensen Institute. Available online http://www.christenseninstitute.org/publications/hybrids
  14. 14. BLENDED RESULTS AT UCF
  15. 15. Fall 2014 Total UCF students 60,400 Students in Face-to-Face (F2F) 50,441 Web OR Blended 38,469 F2F + Web 12,157* F2F + Blended 8,827* F2F + Web OR Blended 18,288* F2F + Web + Blended 2,696* Web Only 5,522 (Summer 2014: 9,036)
  16. 16. 3 2 4 4 3 53 2 4 4 3 44 4 5 5 4 6 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Spring 11 Sum 11 Fall 11 Spring 12 Sum 12 Fall 12 F2F (n=748,226) Blended (n=67,190) Fully Online (n=176,983) Student Withdrawal Used with Permission. UCF Research Initiative for Teaching Effectiveness
  17. 17. 87 91 87 87 90 87 90 94 90 90 94 9088 89 88 87 89 87 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Spring 11 Sum 11 Fall 11 Spring 12 Sum 12 Fall 12 F2F (n=669,638) Blended (n=66,124) Fully Online (n=176,856) Student Success Used with Permission. UCF Research Initiative for Teaching Effectiveness
  18. 18. UCF Student Evaluation Protocol • Feedback • Interest in learning • Use of class time • Organization • Continuity • Pace of course • Assessment of your progress • Texts and supplemental material • Description of objectives • Communication • Expression of expectations • Availability to assist • Respect and concern • Stimulation of interest • Facilitation of learning • Overall assessment
  19. 19. Facilitation of learning Communication of ideas Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor Then... The probability of an overall rating of Excellent = .97 & The probability of an overall rating of Fair or Poor =.00 If... A Decision Rule for the Probability of UCF Faculty Member Receiving an Overall Rating of Excellent (n=1,280,890) Respect and concern for students Used with Permission. UCF Research Initiative for Teaching Effectiveness
  20. 20. 52 48 48 44 42 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 M W F2F RV V % "Excellent" ratings by modality (n=913,688) Student Course Evaluations Used with Permission. UCF Research Initiative for Teaching Effectiveness
  21. 21. Amount of interaction in UCF Online Classes Compared to Comparable F2F Sections More interaction Equal to or less than W n=55 M N=40 Modality 13% 45% 16% 15% 62% 30% 2% 7% 8% 3% Increased Somewhat increased About the same Somewhat decreased Decreased Used with Permission. UCF Research Initiative for Teaching Effectiveness
  22. 22. Quality of Interaction in UCF Online Classes Compared to Comparable F2F Sections Better interaction Equal to or less than W n=55 M N=43 Modality 22% 30% 33% 19% 35% 37% 9% 2% 14% Increased Somewhat increased About the same Somewhat decreased Decreased Used with Permission. UCF Research Initiative for Teaching Effectiveness
  23. 23. WHAT WILL YOUR BLEND BE?
  24. 24. Hallowell’s Human Moments by kthompso404 on Flickr CC BY 2.0 License http://www.flickr.com/photos/53256849@N05/7691997840
  25. 25. Non-scored activity Scored activity A Range of Student Engagement A Range of Student Engagement by Dr. Kelvin Thompson available at http://bit.ly/rehumanizing_slides is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/deed.en_US.
  26. 26. What Do You Want Your Students to “Get”? Course design Course syllabus Course assignments Student reflections Human moments Invisible to students Articulated to students Experienced by students  “learning” Internalized by students Remembered by students
  27. 27. Content Interaction Assessment
  28. 28. Content Interaction Assessment
  29. 29. Content Interaction Assessment
  30. 30. Content Interaction Assessment
  31. 31. Content Interaction Assessment
  32. 32. MOOC Open Educational Resources (OER) Open CourseWare (OCW) Open Learning iTunesU podcasts screencasts online course blended hybrid virtual worlds Second Life flipped class Personal Learning Network (PLN) TwitterTED Talks YouTube Google Wikipedia wikis blogs RSS Yahoo Pipes html
  33. 33. Technologies In-Depth Look at Four • Free! • Fairly dependable • Useful in all modalities • Mobile-friendly • Range of uses Survey of Many • Most free • Some single function – Interaction – Assessment – Content
  34. 34. Read More About It Reading List: Rehumanizing Through Technologies http://bit.ly/readinglist_rehumanizing Annotated List of Technologies http://bit.ly/technologies_rehumanizing
  35. 35. TED-Ed http://ed.ted.com
  36. 36. Flickr http://flickr.com
  37. 37. Twitter http://twitter.com
  38. 38. Diigo http://diigo.com
  39. 39. Pair and Share • Think about the concentric circles, the blocks, the outcomes, the technologies… • Partner-up with one or more colleagues • Discuss: How would you characterize your course goals in light of the models presented (i.e., what are you trying to accomplish? where does it fit?)?
  40. 40. Implementation Issues
  41. 41. BYOD? • Some studies indicate that 95% of college students bring cell phones to class each day - May, 2012 • Nationwide, 88% of adults have cell phones with the majority (55%) using for internet access • 61% of US adults own a laptop computer - Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2012 http://bit.ly/pew_data http://bit.ly/may_data
  42. 42. Ethical/Legal Issues • Privacy • FERPA • Accessibility
  43. 43. FERPA Recommendations • Assume conservative FERPA interpretation • All official communications (including grades) in LMS • FERPA/Web2.0 statements in course documents • No required personally identifiable information on public web http://bit.ly/ferpa_coursedocs
  44. 44. Accessibility Recommendations • Adopt a “universal design for learning” mindset. • Assume you will have accommodation needs. – Select new media/technologies with accessibility in mind. – Think: “What will I do differently to make old accessible? • Plan A: Do that now (e.g., script everything). • Plan B: Be prepared to take action when needed. • Assume that it is all up to you. – Educate yourself. – Take initiative. – Be grateful when help is available. http://bit.ly/online_accessibility
  45. 45. Cautions • Time commitment (beware of diminishing returns) • Some students resist “active learning” • Your results may vary – Strive for balance – Keep It Simple Starting (KISS)
  46. 46. Integration between the f2f and online dimensions is a crucial design challenge for blended learning.
  47. 47. DESIGNING FOR BLENDED LEARNING
  48. 48. Caveats • No widely accepted definition of blended learning • Blended = “best/worst of both worlds” • Blended learning best conceptualized as f2f-enhanced web course • Integration of f2f and online is perhaps the most elusive of concepts for blended instructors • Materials shared here are targeted at those transitioning from f2f-only experience but may be applicable to those with prior online or blended experience • No one-size-fits-all answers • Goal: Provide resources you can use in developing your blended learning courses 52
  49. 49. OVERVIEW The Blended Learning Toolkit 53 Refer to Accompanying Hand Out: http://bit.ly/tour_blt
  50. 50. Project Overview • An open educational resource (OER) Blended Learning Toolkit containing: – Best practices, strategies, models, and course design principles. – Two OER prototype courses in Composition and Algebra. – Faculty development resources – Assessment and data collection protocols, including survey instruments and standards. 55
  51. 51. Goals for BlendKit Course • Design and develop your blended learning course • Consideration of key issues related to blended learning and practical guidance in helping you produce actual materials for your blended course (i.e., from design documents through creating content pages to peer review feedback at your own institutions). 56
  52. 52. BlendKit Course Materials • Instructional modules • BlendKit Reader • Do-It-Yourself design tasks • Recordings of interdisciplinary faculty interviews • Recordings of online webinar discussions with faculty group http://bit.ly/blendkit 57
  53. 53. GUIDED TOUR BlendKit Course Materials 58 Refer to Accompanying Hand Out: BlendKit Course Materials
  54. 54. DIY Tasks • Step-by-step guides for many common development tasks – Explanations – Templates – Examples • Five broad tasks with at least 2 sub-tasks each • Substantive in specificity! http://bit.ly/blendkit_diy 61
  55. 55. DIY Tasks Task 01: Conceptualize Your Blended Learning Course Task 02: Design for Interaction in Your Blended Learning Course Task 03: Decide Upon Assessments of Learning in Your Blended Learning Course Task 04: Develop Content/Assignment Pages for Your Blended Learning Course Task 05: Assure Quality in Your Blended Learning Course http://bit.ly/blendkit_diy 62
  56. 56. COURSE BLUEPRINT Task 01: Conceptualize Your Blended Course 63
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  61. 61. Course Blueprint • Easily by-passed, but don’t! • High level overview mapping course goals to assignments • Use electronic version or just do it on a piece of paper – Word template looks cool but doc versions may cause problems • May be “in your head,” but get it out on paper • Ignore delivery mode (f2f v. online) initially – Focus on identifying the best activities to achieve the course goals 69
  62. 62. MIX MAP Task 01: Conceptualize Your Blended Course 70
  63. 63. 72
  64. 64. 73
  65. 65. Mix Map • Identify a mode (f2f, online, both) for all components • Suggested approach – online course with face-to-face enhancements • How to decide on delivery mode: – Start with your absolutes - What has to be delivered face-to-face or online? What works best in one environment v. the other? – Next – What will work in either environment? – Note: You may need to modify an existing activity to fit a new delivery mode. (See Task 3) • Map out your overall strategy paying particular attention to how the two environments integrate – Integration is the single most challenging issue in blended learning! 74
  66. 66. CREATE COURSE DOCUMENT DRAFTS Task 02: Design for Interaction 75
  67. 67. 77
  68. 68. 78
  69. 69. 79
  70. 70. Create Course Documents • Emphasis on single-purpose online documents (Neidorf, 2006) • Making the formerly implicit (f2f) explicit (online) • Clear articulation of student expectations • Some people prefer “print-friendly” versions (e.g., pdf) over HTML – TIP: See accessibility guidelines! 80
  71. 71. MODULE INTERACTION WORKSHEET Task 02: Design for Interaction 81
  72. 72. 83
  73. 73. 84
  74. 74. 85
  75. 75. Module Interaction Worksheet • Builds upon Blueprint and Mix Map tasks • Sets the stage for Creating Module Pages • Assumes that one will be developing online modules – Several questions useful for designing interaction independent of module – Possibly think “weeks” instead of modules • Another opportunity to consider integration of f2f and online 86
  76. 76. ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS Task 03: Decide Upon Assessments of Learning 87
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  78. 78. 90
  79. 79. Assignment Instructions • Remember to revise Blueprint and Course Docs as ideas evolve! • Goal: Standalone documents with perfect clarity of expectations • The clearer the written communication, the more time is freed for f2f activities. • Goal: Make the formerly implicit explicit – However, written instructions could be distributed f2f or online. • Make sure students understand how each assignment links online and f2f • Do not duplicate assignments or content between f2f and online – Ex: Reading assignments as homework and then cover content in class. Make sure class discussion covers items subject to confusion and expands on reading through examples, case studies, etc. – If online assignment is an extension of f2f discussion/activity, ensure students understand what needs to be added or expanded in the online assignment. 91
  80. 80. CONFIGURE ONLINE QUIZ SETTINGS Task 03: Decide Upon Assessments of Learning 92
  81. 81. 94
  82. 82. Configure Online Quiz Settings • A primer for online assessment – Minimize motivation for cheating – Examine biases for assessment in one mode over another – Make assumptions explicit (e.g., collaboration, etc.) – Opportunity to review cognitive level of existing assessments • Specifics will be determined by your LMS/testing software 95
  83. 83. BLENDED INTEGRATION CHART Task 04: Develop Content/Assignment Pages 96
  84. 84. Blended Integration Chart • Builds upon earlier design work • Aligns summative goal(s) with objectives, assessments, etc. • Focus is on integration of the f2f and online components for each activity 98
  85. 85. CREATE MODULE PAGES Task 04: Develop Content/Assignment Pages 100
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  87. 87. 103
  88. 88. 104
  89. 89. Create Module Pages • A possible extension of earlier Assignment Instructions and Module Interaction tasks • Goal: Standalone documents with perfect clarity of expectations • The clearer the written communication, the more time is freed for f2f activities. • One cohesive whole from which students may access assignment instructions, course content, etc. 105
  90. 90. MODULE TEMPLATE Task 04: Develop Content/Assignment Pages 106
  91. 91. 108
  92. 92. Module Template • Use as a starting point • Decide upon all elements to include in your modules (e.g, objectives, content, references) • Use Word style sheet (e.g., “Heading 1,” etc.) • Review Assignment Instructions for possible module headings/sub-headings • Maintain consistency from one module to next 109
  93. 93. BLENDED COURSE IMPLEMENTATION CHECKLIST Task 05: Assure Quality 110
  94. 94. 112
  95. 95. Implementation Checklist • Very generic steps! • Incorporate your institution’s requirements • Structured approach is reminiscent of managing an online course (may feel unusual for f2f) • Note numerous cues for fostering integration of f2f/online • Note emphasis on iterative design (e.g., simple design feedback collection punch list for next version) 113
  96. 96. BLENDED COURSE SELF- ASSESSMENT/PEER REVIEW FORM Task 05: Assure Quality 114
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  100. 100. Self-Assessment/Peer Review Form • Many elements are common to courses in all modes • Blended-specific sections – First (“Course Expectations”) – Last (“Implementation of Blended”) • Evaluate it yourself, but there’s no substitute for a new set of eyes! • Identify a trusted colleague • Note evaluation of design vs. implementation 119
  101. 101. Test Drive! • Select one of the DIY design documents • Take a few minutes to review the document in more depth • Begin to use the document to help with your personal design challenge • Note: Many find the Mix Map the most approachable to start. (Hint: You can just draw a Venn diagram with pen and paper)
  102. 102. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
  103. 103. Virtual Blended Conference • 2015 OLC Blended Conference and Workshop • Leading higher ed conference on blended • July 7-8, 2015 • Individual/group registration available now: http://bit.ly/blend15_virtual
  104. 104. BlendKit2016 • Open, online course built around BlendKit Course materials – Dates TBA (five weeks this spring) – Facilitative communications – Weekly webinars – Interaction opportunities among cohort – Choose your own participation level • To Register or to Subscribe to Mailing List: http://bit.ly/blendkit
  105. 105. Teaching Online Pedagogical Repository a resource to support the curation of effective pedagogical practices in online and blended courses individual entries include: • strategy description drawn from the pedagogical practice of online/blended teaching faculty • artifacts depicting the strategy from actual courses • alignment with cited findings from research or professional practice literature All released for reuse/remix under Creative Commons http://topr.online.ucf.edu
  106. 106. UCF Faculty Seminars in Online Teaching • Online/blended learning focused • Co-presented by teaching faculty and instructional designer • Information-packed • 30 minutes! • Interactive webinar format • Repository of recordings and supporting resources • New topics each semester Subscribe to mailing list to be notified of upcoming seminars http://bit.ly/facultyseminars
  107. 107. TOPcast: The Teaching Online Podcast http://bit.ly/topcast_yarn
  108. 108. Your Personal Action Plan • Reflect upon today’s session • Review your notes on BlendKit Course • Identify one or more ideas you can put into action • Write down how you will apply the idea • Tell one other person what you plan to do • Exchange contact info and plan to touch base
  109. 109. Students Are… by kthompso404 on Flickr CC BY 2.0 License http://www.flickr.com/photos/53256849@N05/7759779256
  110. 110. Thank You! Dr. Kelvin Thompson @kthompso kelvin@ucf.edu http://linkedin.com/in/drkelvinthompson http://bit.ly/thompson_famu2015

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