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Digital History in the student learning experience

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Slides for session I ran at History New to Teaching event, Institute of Historical Research, London, Tuesday 12th September 2017

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Digital History in the student learning experience

  1. 1. Digital History in the student learning experience James Baker, Lecturer in Digital History/Archives University of Sussex slideshare.net/drjwbaker @j_w_baker james.baker@sussex.ac.uk This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Exceptions: quotations, embeds from external sources, logos, and marked images.
  2. 2. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Scenario Because you are new and fresh and young, you've been given the (vague) task “making the curriculum 'digital'” You aren't making a new module rather adapting what exists (so the learning outcomes remain historical) There is no commitment to changing assessments or assessment patterns The person asking for 'digital' skills doesn't know what they are but has a sense of their relevance/importance
  3. 3. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Sequence Construction Activity Working in pairs (8 minutes) ● Reorganise a list on things to teach into the order you think they should be taught ● Justify your ordering ● Fill in blanks: things you think the students also need. Working in pairs of pairs (8 minutes) ● Discuss you orderings, justifications, and new items ● Reorder, add new things ● Draft a delivery strategy: in what contexts you know might this work? Working all together (8 minutes) ● Review our work
  4. 4. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Sussex History 2017/18 Autumn - Doing History in the Digital Age 1. What is History 2. Reading History 3. Writing History 4. Referencing History 5. Library 7. Searching for History 8. Interfaces to History 9. Archiving History 10. Organising History 11. Sources of History 12. Review - 1 hour per week - Part of Y1 Module 'Early Modern World' - Module is core for all History students - Timetabled in lecture slot - One question in the exam - Get into digital through history skills - Primary sources as point of focus - Tie to Early Modern lectures/seminars - 'Lectures' super practical - Software Carpentry influence - Peer learning exercises - Combination of laptop and paper work - Students work together, share laptops - Bring their own but don't have to
  5. 5. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Sussex History 2017/18 Spring - Doing Digital History 1. What is Digital History? 2. Data types and Data fields 3. Making historical data I (theory) 4. Making historical data II (practical: obtaining) 5. Making historical data III (practical: tidying) 6. Visualising historical data I (theory) 7. Visualising historical data II (practice: graphs) 8. Visualising historical data III (practice: maps) 9. Doing Digital History during your degree 10. Preserving historical data 11. Sharing historical data - 1 hour per week Part of Y1 Module 'Making of the Modern World' - Core module - Lecture slot - One exam question - Primary sources - Modern World focus - 'Lectures' practical - Peer learning - Laptops - Multi-week themes - Week 9 timed with Y2 module selection - Build dataset in Week 4 that they use throughout
  6. 6. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Headline findings Students like practical Peer learning helps manage mass practicals Students like learning about history Primary sources are a perfect hook Students like learning about historical practice Students dislike titles that look like maths/stats Students have hugely varying skill levels You learn a huge amount about the assumptions students and colleagues make about 'digital'.
  7. 7. Digital History in the student learning experience James Baker, Lecturer in Digital History/Archives University of Sussex slideshare.net/drjwbaker @j_w_baker james.baker@sussex.ac.uk This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Exceptions: quotations, embeds from external sources, logos, and marked images.
  8. 8. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Further Reading Baker, James. “Fostering Digital History: Integrating Digital Research Skills into an Undergraduate History Curriculum,” October 1, 2016. http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/66712/. Beals, M. H. “Workshop: Slow Down! Teaching Students to Encode Their Close Reading.” M. H. Beals, September 8, 2015. http://mhbeals.com/workshop-slow-down-teaching-students-to-encode-their-close- reading/. Cohen, Daniel J, and Roy Rosenzweig. Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006. Crymble, Adam, Fred Gibbs, Allison Hegel, Caleb McDaniel, Ian Milligan, Evan Taparata, Jeri Wieringa, Jeremy Boggs, and William J. Turkel. The Programming Historian - Print Edition. Zenodo, 2016. doi:10.5281/zenodo.49873. Crymble, Adam, Karen Colbron, and Ian Chowcat. “Digital in the Undergraduate History Curriculum: Spotlight on the Digital Case Study.,” November 22, 2016. http://researchprofiles.herts.ac.uk/portal/en/publications/digital-in-the-undergraduate-history- curriculum(11523132-44d3-45e8-983e-5208e3b11675).html. Froehlich, Heather. “On Teaching Coding to English Studies Students.” Heather Froehlich, January 29, 2014. http://hfroehlich.wordpress.com/2014/01/29/on-teaching-coding-to-english-studies-students/. Graham, Shawn, Ian Milligan, and Scott Weingart. Exploring Big Historical Data: The Historian’s Macroscope, 2016. Mullen, Lincoln. “Learning How to Teach History in a Digital Age.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. ProfHacker, August 26, 2013. http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/learning-how-to-teach-history-in-a- digital-age/51875. Pugh, Jo. “Time Machines and How to Use Them : An Overview of Digital Humanities Teaching and Research,” June 2014. https://dlib.york.ac.uk/yodl/app/home/detail?id=york%3a823026&ref=search. Wilson, Greg. “Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned.” ArXiv:1307.5448 [Physics], July 20, 2013. http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.5448.

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