University of Bahrain<br />Bahrain Teachers College<br />Research Methods for Educators – TCPB 124<br />Second Semester 20...
Content<br />Description<br />Methods<br /><ul><li>Teacher population, Sample, and Survey Procedure
Arab Parent Sample and Procedure
 Teacher Survey Design
 Arab Mother Survey</li></ul>Results<br /><ul><li>Arab Family Involvement
Communication Styles
Teacher Efficacy and Approach to Culture
Perceived Support From School Administration / District and Arab Families
Teacher’s Comments</li></ul>Discussion<br />
Description<br />Type of research: Quantitative ( Survey ) – Qualitative ( Interviews)<br />Researchers: Samira Moosa, Stu...
Teacher survey design <br />Each survey included cover letter that assured the anonymity participants <br />The teachers b...
Surveys was divided to 5 sections <br />
Arab mothers survey <br />The survey have a lot of information such as<br />Date of birth<br /> Country of origin <br />Le...
The interview were conducted around 5 topics:<br />
Results<br />
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Research question project ppt

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Research question project ppt

  1. 1. University of Bahrain<br />Bahrain Teachers College<br />Research Methods for Educators – TCPB 124<br />Second Semester 2009 / 2010<br />Teacher Perceptions of Arab Parental Involvement in Elementary Schools<br />
  2. 2. Content<br />Description<br />Methods<br /><ul><li>Teacher population, Sample, and Survey Procedure
  3. 3. Arab Parent Sample and Procedure
  4. 4. Teacher Survey Design
  5. 5. Arab Mother Survey</li></ul>Results<br /><ul><li>Arab Family Involvement
  6. 6. Communication Styles
  7. 7. Teacher Efficacy and Approach to Culture
  8. 8. Perceived Support From School Administration / District and Arab Families
  9. 9. Teacher’s Comments</li></ul>Discussion<br />
  10. 10. Description<br />Type of research: Quantitative ( Survey ) – Qualitative ( Interviews)<br />Researchers: Samira Moosa, Stuart A. Karabenick, and Leah Adams<br />Research Question: what are the teachers’ perceptions of Arab parent involvement in America? <br />Purpose (Objectives):Researchers hope that school communities will act with increased sensitivity to the needs of Arab families, and indeed all families, in the days ahead. They also hope researchers will work quickly to add to their current knowledge resulting in better service to Arab American families.<br />Sample:<br />Structured surveys of Arab (n =45) and non-Arab (n = 87) teachers<br />Interviews of 39 first-generation Arab mothers<br />6. Methods: Surveys – interviews<br />
  11. 11. Teacher survey design <br />Each survey included cover letter that assured the anonymity participants <br />The teachers been told how value is<br /> the research, and they’ve been asked<br /> to return the surveys in 3 weeks . <br />
  12. 12. Surveys was divided to 5 sections <br />
  13. 13. Arab mothers survey <br />The survey have a lot of information such as<br />Date of birth<br /> Country of origin <br />Level of education <br />Years and reasons of <br /> immigration to USA <br />
  14. 14. The interview were conducted around 5 topics:<br />
  15. 15. Results<br />
  16. 16. 1. Teachers perceptions of Arab Family Involvement<br /><ul><li>Arab parents consider schools as authority thusthe lack of parents involvement is because they feel alienated.
  17. 17. Education is important to Arab families . The more teachers believed that Arab parents are interested in participating the more they attributed the lack of it to financial resources and time.
  18. 18. Parents could assist their children if provided with the appropriate skills. 87% of teacher believe that all parents could learn ways to assist their kids with school work if shown how to do it.</li></ul>Language is a barrier to Arab parents in helping their kids and that English immersion is the best ways for Arab children to succeed in school <br />
  19. 19. 2. Communication Styles<br /><ul><li>According to teachers, parents who had better English language skills tended to ask more questions and get more involved in the school.
  20. 20. Parents preferred the written letters to be translated into Arabic. This might explain why Arab teachers thought that letters were more effective with non-Arab parents than with Arab parents, especially that if those written letters were in English only.
  21. 21. More than half of the parents preferred to be contacted by telephone, followed by meetings at the school. they found it to be more easier to interact with teachers in order to convey their point of view. It seems that Arab in general prefer personal contact. </li></li></ul><li>3. Teacher Efficacy and Approach to Culture<br /><ul><li>Teachers who included more culturally relevant material believed they were more capable of teaching an ethnically diverse school population.</li></ul>the association between efficacy and cultural relevance<br />and the dimensions discerned<br /><ul><li> Teacher efficacy was significantly correlated with teacher’s perception of parents’ interest and importance.
  22. 22. The more that teachers believed they were capable of teaching and interacting with the Arab population, the more they believed that Arab parents were interested in their children’s education and the more important they considered Arab parent involvement in the schools.
  23. 23. Teachers’ use of culturally relevant material was similarly related to their perceptions of how interested Arab parents were in their children’s school and school involvement</li></li></ul><li>4. Perceived Support From School Administration / District and Arab Families<br /><ul><li> Teachers who perceive themselves proficient also perceive their school administration/district to be culturally supportive and resourceful.
  24. 24. The more that teachers perceived that Arab parents don’t question teachers, the less support and resources they perceive are available from</li></ul>their schools.<br /><ul><li> While those same teachers perceive the parents as being passive, 55% of the teachers tend to believe that Arab parents ask fewer questions than do non- Arab parents and 79% believe that most Arab parents do not question a teacher’s expertise or decisions.</li></li></ul><li>5. Parent Education Programs<br /><ul><li>Inspection of the average importance of the education programs indicates relatively little differentiation, although teachers considered somewhat less important the involvement by families in committees and decision making, as well as after school activities for students.
  25. 25. ESL classes for parents believed by teachers to be much more important than providing parents with information on citizenship, job training, and events.
  26. 26. Teachers considered after school programs more important than did mothers.
  27. 27. Information on becoming US citizens was also considered more important by mothers than by teachers.
  28. 28. Most mothers indicated such information, in addition to U.S. laws and ESL classes, to be of importance.
  29. 29. Teachers considered information about community events more important than did the mothers.</li></li></ul><li>6. Discussion<br />Problems occurred because teachers didn’t understand the Arab culture but it can solved by meetings. <br />Do you think fathers should have been included in the research?. <br />Arab have differences between them and teachers should know that. How?<br />
  30. 30. Group Members<br />

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