Presentation online mentoring-15min

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Presentation online mentoring-15min

  1. 1. ONLINE-MENTORING IN HIGHER EDUCATION AS A MEANS FOR PERSISTENCE, RETENTION AND GRADUATION GLORIA NATIVIDAD, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS
  2. 2. “Mentoring is a developmental partnership through which one person shares knowledge, skills, information and perspective to foster the personal and professional growth of someone else. We all have a need for insight that is outside of our normal life and educational experience. The power of mentoring is that it creates a one-of-a-kind opportunity for collaboration, goal achievement and problem-solving.” - Indiana University. Health Education home page. MENTORING - DEFINITION
  3. 3. • The issue of high attrition rates for undergraduate students enrolled in face-to-face and online courses has become a priority concern for higher education administrators and several foundations. • Online–Mentoring is being considered as a means to address persistence, retention and graduation. The reason for the study
  4. 4. • Over the past three decades the number of students entering higher education has dramatically increased. • Recent student-retention studies indicate that only two thirds of first year students stay in school, and that only one third of those students would earn a bachelor’s degree. The problem:
  5. 5. These numbers are estimates based on a Chronicle analysis of the Entering fall 2004 class at 3,800 colleges. 4.3 MILLION FRESHMEN STARTED COLLEGE IN FALL 2004
  6. 6. 2.1 MILLION DIDN’T OFFICIALLY GRADUATE These numbers are estimates based on a Chronicle analysis of the Entering fall 2004 class at 3,800 colleges.
  7. 7. Highest Graduation Rates
  8. 8. GRADUATION RATES BY STATE
  9. 9. • The development of the personal computer, Internet and other technologies have allowed a much broader and diverse population to enroll in postsecondary education. • Creating a new category of learners (Halsne & Gatta, 2002), quite different from traditional on-campus students. • Therefore, new ways are needed in which to address the problem of retention (Del Valle, R. and Duffy, T. M., 2006).
  10. 10. • Institutions have employed online technologies to provide courses to those students who would not otherwise be served. • Unfortunately, online student retention has been noted as one of the greatest weaknesses in online education (Bierema & Merriam, 2002). Actions taken:
  11. 11. MENTORING FUNCTIONS AND RELATIONSHIPS
  12. 12. Miscommunication Slower Dev. Relationships Increased Writing and Technical Skills Tech Problems Privacy Greater access to Mentors Reduced costs Status Equalization Decreased importance of Demographics Record of Interactions Opportunities Challenges CMC Primary CMC Only CMC Supplemental F-t-F Mentoring Coaching Friendships Counseling Learning Type of Mentoring Mentor Roles Summary of Research Propositions
  13. 13. • Mentoring programs have proven to be effective in academic environments to increase success and retention of students; however, very few educational institutions have incorporated mentoring as part of their pedagogy (George, 2012). Recommendation:
  14. 14. • Offering and incorporating online- mentoring programs at our institutions will provide: a) A means to provide emotional support b) To help students perform better c) To encourage underrepresented groups d) To provide greater access and support to all members (no geographical limitations e) Reduced cost (time and financial cost of meetings) f) And ultimately… PERSIST, STAY AND GRADUATE!
  15. 15. “A great mentor has a knack for making us think we are better than we think we are. They force us to have a good opinion of ourselves, let us know they believe in us. They make us get more out of ourselves, and once we learn how good we really are, we never settle for anything less than our very best." The Prometheus Foundation MENTOR - DEFINITION
  16. 16. References Barab, S.A., & Hay, K.E. (2001). Doing science at the elbows of experts: Issues related to the science apprenticeship camp. Journal of Research in Science Teaching 38(1), 70-102. Freire, P. (1997). A response. In P. Freire, with J. W. Fraser, D. Macedo, T. McKinnon, & W. T. Stokes (Eds.), Mentoring the mentor: A critical dialogue with Paulo Freire (pp. 303-329). New York: Peter Lang. U.S. Department of Education. OPE Office of Postsecondary Education. Federal TRiO Programs. http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/trio/index.html George, M. P. (2012). A model for student mentoring in business schools. International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education. 1(2), 136-154. Ensher, E.A., Heun, C., and Blanchard, A. (2003). Online mentoring and computer- mediated communication: New directions in research. Journal of Vocational Behavior 63, 264-288. Del Valle, R. and Duffy, T. M. (2007). Online learning: Learner characteristics and their approaches to managing learning. Learning Strategies in Distance Education. DOI 10.1007/s11251-007-9039-0 The Chronicle of Higher Education. College completion: Who graduates from College, who doesn’t, and why it matters. http://collegecompletion.chronicle.com/about/

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