Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Simon TannerKing’s College LondonE:simon.tanner@kcl.ac.ukT: @SimonTanner
Measuring Impact for Digital Resources  The Arcadia Fund have provided funds to explore methods and  techniques for impact...
Measuring impact for the REF  The REF factors impact as meaning:  The assessment of impact will be based on expert review ...
Making an impact or just a splash?                                     © H de Smet
www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/inspiring.html Inspiring Research, Inspiring Scholarship
New areas of research enabled“Old Bailey Online reaches out to communities, such as family historians, who are keen to fin...
Effective, efficient and world leadingwww.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/inspiring.html
Bringing                                     collections out                                       of the darkwww.kdcs.kcl...
Bestowing economic & community benefits   Glasgow Museums Collection is the city’s biggest single fiscal asset   valued at...
Interdisciplinary & collaborative“The Freeze Frame archive isinvaluable in charting changes inthe polar regions. Making th...
On the other hand...“You want a massive digital collection: SCAN THE STACKS!... You agonize over                   digital...
Measuring the Impact                       © H de Smet
The Balanced Value Model      Know what you want      to assess.      Know why you want      to assess it.      Know what ...
The Balanced Value Modelwww.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html
Impact = 4 Perspectiveswww.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html
Our case for ImpactWe are more effective and efficient in delivering change andbenefits to the external and internal stake...
Where is the Human in DH? Are we so focussed upon the digital aspects and the Humanities subjects they afford in a Digital...
Do we dare to ask?  Who benefits from our research?  What do those benefits look like?  Do the beneficiaries have any say ...
Simon Tanner, King’s College London   Email: simon.tanner@kcl.ac.uk      Twitter: @SimonTanner
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Simon Tanner

494 views

Published on

Presented as part of "Realising the Opportunities of Digital Humanities" (#RODH2012)

Oct 23-25, 2012, Ireland.

More info: www.dri.ie/programme

  • Be the first to comment

Simon Tanner

  1. 1. Simon TannerKing’s College LondonE:simon.tanner@kcl.ac.ukT: @SimonTanner
  2. 2. Measuring Impact for Digital Resources The Arcadia Fund have provided funds to explore methods and techniques for impact and value assessment for digital resources. Factoring impact as meaning: the measurable outcomes arising from the existence of a digital resource that demonstrate a change in the life or life opportunities of the community for which the resource is intended. www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html
  3. 3. Measuring impact for the REF The REF factors impact as meaning: The assessment of impact will be based on expert review of case studies submitted by higher education institutions. Case studies may include any social, economic or cultural impact or benefit beyond academia that has taken place during the assessment period, and was underpinned by excellent research produced by the submitting institution within a given timeframe.. www.ref.ac.uk/pubs/2011-01/ A recorded or otherwise auditable occasion of influence from academic research on another actor or organization. a. Academic impacts from research are influences upon actors in academia or universities. b. External impacts are influences on actors outside higher education, that is, in business, government or civil society. http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/
  4. 4. Making an impact or just a splash? © H de Smet
  5. 5. www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/inspiring.html Inspiring Research, Inspiring Scholarship
  6. 6. New areas of research enabled“Old Bailey Online reaches out to communities, such as family historians, who are keen to find a personal history, reflected in a national story, and in the process re-enforces the workings of a civil society. Digital resources both create a new audience, and reconfigure our analysis to favour the individual.” Professor Tim Hitchcock, University of Hertfordshire “Digitised resources allow me to discover the hidden lives of disabled people, who have not traditionally left records of their lives. I have found disability was discussed by many writers in the Eighteenth Century and that disabled men and women played www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/inspiring.html
  7. 7. Effective, efficient and world leadingwww.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/inspiring.html
  8. 8. Bringing collections out of the darkwww.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/inspiring.html
  9. 9. Bestowing economic & community benefits Glasgow Museums Collection is the city’s biggest single fiscal asset valued at £1.4 billion. It contains around 1.2 million objects. On average only 2% of the collection is exhibited to the public at any one time. Digital access is opening up further access to these collections. A major impact sought is to increase self-confidence in the populace – to feel less marginalised, less insignificant, less unheard. Increased feelings of self-worth through interaction with the Museums will spill over into every aspect of their lives. Digitised content & JISC Collections negotiations save the sector ~£43 million per year www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/inspiring.html
  10. 10. Interdisciplinary & collaborative“The Freeze Frame archive isinvaluable in charting changes inthe polar regions. Making thematerial available to all will helpwith further research intoscientific studies aroundglobal warming andclimate change”Pen Hadow,Polar Explorer www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/inspiring.html
  11. 11. On the other hand...“You want a massive digital collection: SCAN THE STACKS!... You agonize over digital metadata and the purity thereof... And you offer crap access. If I ask you to talk about your collections, I know that you will glow as you describe the amazing treasures you have.  When you go for money for digitization projects, you talk up the incredible cultural value... But then if I look at the results of those digitization projects, I find the shittiest websites on the planet.  It’s like a gallery spent all its money buying art and then just stuck the paintings in supermarket bags and leaned them against the wall.” Nat Torkington (@gnat) http://bit.ly/rNHMVr “Libraries: Where It All Went Wrong” The text of a Speech delivered to provoke the National and State Librarians of Australasia, November 2011
  12. 12. Measuring the Impact © H de Smet
  13. 13. The Balanced Value Model Know what you want to assess. Know why you want to assess it. Know what you will do with the results. Know how much it is worth for you to know this information.www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html
  14. 14. The Balanced Value Modelwww.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html
  15. 15. Impact = 4 Perspectiveswww.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html
  16. 16. Our case for ImpactWe are more effective and efficient in delivering change andbenefits to the external and internal stakeholders (InternalImpact);Our organisation or our stakeholders are gaining strategicadvantage through the innovation inherent in this digital activity(Innovation Impact);We are delivering a strong economic benefit to our stakeholdersthat demonstrate the worth and value of our endeavours in clearmonetary terms (Economic Impact); andthe community of stakeholders has been changed by the resourcein beneficial ways that can be clearly identified (Social Impact)
  17. 17. Where is the Human in DH? Are we so focussed upon the digital aspects and the Humanities subjects they afford in a Digital Humanities context that we forget the human part? Who are the Humanities for? Does DH serve them equally, better or worse than just the Humanities? Have we lost touch with those who benefit from our endeavours? We have to square the dichotomy of instrumentalist versus intangible value viewpoints.
  18. 18. Do we dare to ask? Who benefits from our research? What do those benefits look like? Do the beneficiaries have any say in what the Humanities are or should be? Are there others out there who care but do not directly benefit? For whom are we responsible? When we benefit someone do we care? If we allowed our beneficiaries to define success what would that look like? Would we like their conclusions and are we capable of change? If we measure it, does that change it or us or them?
  19. 19. Simon Tanner, King’s College London Email: simon.tanner@kcl.ac.uk Twitter: @SimonTanner

×