Doctor Eye Institute
What is Cataract ?

All About Cataract ?
What are the symptoms of cataracts?

What are the different ...
All About Cataract ?
Since last 48 years in service, The Doctor Eye Institute Pvt. Ltd. has been the pioneer in providing
...
What is Cataract ?
A cataract is the clouding of the lens of our eye and is a natural part of the ageing process. There
is...
What are the different types of Cataracts ?
•Age-related cataract:
Most cataracts are related to aging.
•Congenital catara...
What are the different types of cataract surgery?
Extra capsular cataract surgery
- conventional technique
- incision size...
Phacoemulsification: (for SICS and MICS)
known as phaco surgery
uses ultrasonic energy to cut, break and suck the cataract...
What is Glaucoma?
Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness, is responsible for fifteen percent of world blindness. It
is a f...
What are the symptoms of glaucoma?
In most cases, glaucoma is asymptomatic (has no symptoms). By the time an individual
ex...
Diabetic Retinopathy
If you have Diabetes, you need to pay special attention to your EYES before it is too late. Failing
v...
Pediatric Ophthalmology
Pediatric ophthalmologists focus on the development of the visual system and the various
diseases ...
Infections (conjunctivitis).
Strabismus is a misalignment of the eyes that affects 2-4% of the population; it is often
ass...
Genetic disorders often cause eye problems for affected children. Since approximately 30% of
genetic syndromes affect the ...
What is a corneal transplant? Is it safe?
A corneal transplant involves replacing a diseased or scarred cornea with a new ...
What problems can develop from a corneal transplant?
Even with a fairly high success rate, some problems can develop, such...
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Doctor Eye Institute Pvt. Ltd. is successfully treating all sorts of optical disorders (eye diseases) for past 48 years in Mumbai (India). It is an ISO 9001 - 2008 certified hospital with following facilities

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  1. 1. Doctor Eye Institute What is Cataract ? All About Cataract ? What are the symptoms of cataracts? What are the different types of Cataracts ? What are the different treatments available? What are the different types of cataract surgery? What is Glaucoma? What are the symptoms of glaucoma? What is a corneal transplant? Is it safe? What problems can develop from a corneal transplant?
  2. 2. All About Cataract ? Since last 48 years in service, The Doctor Eye Institute Pvt. Ltd. has been the pioneer in providing many world class treatments for Total Eye Care in Mumbai, India. For decades we have provided the best equipment and facilities keeping updated with changing times and technology – a pursuit for excellence has been our tradition. With the varied set up of highly sophisticated equipments and technology, we have a team of highly qualified Ophthalmologists with us. Our team includes highly qualified Anterior segment Surgeons with over 50 years of experience performing different types of Eye surgeries at our hospital The precision and refinement of today’s modern Day Care Eye Surgeries including Phacoemulsification surgeries for Cataract Removal enables us to maximize results in treating every patient’s unique eye problem. Till date thousands of successful Ophthalmic Surgeries have been performed at the institute with consistent results.
  3. 3. What is Cataract ? A cataract is the clouding of the lens of our eye and is a natural part of the ageing process. There is no Medication, Drops or Diet available that can prevent or slow down cataract formation. Surgical removal is the only known effective cure for cataract. After Cataract Surgery Intra Ocular Lens (IOL) is implanted through the opening created and placed inside the eye in place of the natural lens that has been removed. What are the symptoms of cataracts? • Painless blurring of vision • Glare and reduction of vision in bright light. • Double vision in one eye, • Fading of colors. • Frequent change in eye glass power
  4. 4. What are the different types of Cataracts ? •Age-related cataract: Most cataracts are related to aging. •Congenital cataract: Some babies are born with cataracts or develop them in childhood, often in both eyes. These cataracts may not affect vision. If they do, they may need to be removed. •Secondary cataract: Cataracts are more likely to develop in people who have certain other health problems, such as diabetes. Also, cataracts are sometimes linked to steroid use. •Traumatic cataract: Cataracts can develop soon after an eye injury, or years later. What are the different treatments available? Choose No needle - No stitch - No patch Cataract surgeries by Phacoemulsification with Foldable IOL implantation at Doctor Eye Institute State of the Art Technology at Doctor Eye Institute includes; * Latest Whitestar Signature Phaco system * Ellips SX Headpiece * HIR - 900 Microscope * Motorised Slit lamp with EBIOS system * Micro incision Phaco Surgery with Monofocal / Multifocal / Toric IOL implants WHITESTAR COLD PHACO Technology of Signature system is clinically proven to produce clearer corneas on post-op day 1. This is one of its types as it can perform Phacoemulsification and Posterior Vitrectomy with the same system.
  5. 5. What are the different types of cataract surgery? Extra capsular cataract surgery - conventional technique - incision size from 10 to 12 mm - needs stitches to close the wound. Small incision cataract surgery The advantages associated with the smaller incision have made phacoemulsification the ideal technique for cataract surgery and the preferred one where the resources are available. However, this technique cannot be employed as the standard procedure in developing countries due to certain reasons. Manual small incision cataract surgery offers similar advantages with the merits of wider applicability, better safety, a shorter learning curve and lower cost. Certain cataracts, like hypermature Morgagnian or traumatic cataracts are difficult to handle with phacoemulsification. Manual SICS can be performed in almost all types of cataracts and time spent on nucleus delivery does not vary with the cataract.
  6. 6. Phacoemulsification: (for SICS and MICS) known as phaco surgery uses ultrasonic energy to cut, break and suck the cataract. incision size varies from 0.9 to 3 mm No stitches hence no irritation less healing time , so early recovery less postoperative complication. No patch to cover the eye No injection or anesthesia. Advantages of Phacoemulsification: There are no stitches. There is less trauma to the eye. Patients have improved vision sooner usually between 3 to 5 days. Patients can resume their daily activities almost immediately.
  7. 7. What is Glaucoma? Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness, is responsible for fifteen percent of world blindness. It is a family of ocular diseases characterized by progressive damage to the optic nerve, which is the part of the eye that carries the images we see to the brain. Often called the "sneak thief of sight" most forms of glaucoma do not produce symptoms until the optic nerve is already severely damaged. But if diagnosed early, the disease can be controlled and permanent vision loss can be prevented. Key points to remember about Glaucoma 1. Glaucoma generally has no signs or symptoms until serious loss of vision has occurred. 2. If you have a family history of Glaucoma you are at a higher risk and hence need a regular eye check up. Everyone, from babies to senior citizens, is at a risk of developing this disease. 3. The best way to protect the damage is early diagnosis, proper treatment and regular follow ups. 4. You and your doctor will need to become partners and work together to control your condition and prevent it from advancing. It is a chronic condition and needs lifetime monitoring and treatment
  8. 8. What are the symptoms of glaucoma? In most cases, glaucoma is asymptomatic (has no symptoms). By the time an individual experiences decreased vision, the disease is frequently in its latter stages. Since early warning signs of glaucoma are rare, it is important --- especially for those at risk --- to have medical eye examinations at appropriate intervals, as described in this section. Symptoms depend on the type of glaucoma the individual has. Those who have chronic glaucoma may not be aware of any symptoms because the disease develops slowly and patients rarely notice loss of peripheral vision. Those who have an acute form of glaucoma may develop severe symptoms because ocular pressure rises quickly and they may experience: Blurred vision, especially at night Halos or rainbows around lights Severe headaches or eye pain Nausea EX-PRESS™* Glaucoma Filtration Device is the latest and most effective device implanted during the Glaucoma Surgery to control the eye pressure. The EX-PRESS™ Glaucoma Filtration Device enables the drainage system of the eye, which has been damaged by glaucoma, to be bypassed.
  9. 9. Diabetic Retinopathy If you have Diabetes, you need to pay special attention to your EYES before it is too late. Failing vision could be the first sign of damage being caused to your vital organs due to diabetes. Here’s why Doctor Eye Institute with its latest and finest treatment is the preferred place for you to address your Diabetic Retinopathy (damage caused to retina) Oculoplasty Most common oculoplasty disorders are : Ptosis ie low or drooping upper lids Entropion or Inward turning of lids Ectropion or Outward turning of lids Eye Bags ie puffy upper or lower lids Correction of all these disorders requires surgery and our institute is fully equipped to perform all the above surgeries.
  10. 10. Pediatric Ophthalmology Pediatric ophthalmologists focus on the development of the visual system and the various diseases that disrupt visual development in children. Pediatric ophthalmologists also have expertise in managing the various ocular diseases that affect children. Pediatric ophthalmologists are qualified to perform complexeye surgery as well as to manage children's eye problems using glasses and medications. Many ophthalmologists and other physicians refer pediatric patients to a pediatric ophthalmologist for examination and management of ocular problems due to children's unique needs. In addition to children with obvious vision problems, children with head turns, head tilts, squinting of the eyes, or preferred head postures (torticollis) are typically referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist for evaluation. Pediatric ophthalmologists typically also manage adults with eye movement disorders (such as nystagmus or strabismus) due to their familiarity with strabismus conditions.
  11. 11. Infections (conjunctivitis). Strabismus is a misalignment of the eyes that affects 2-4% of the population; it is often associated with amblyopia. The inward turning gaze commonly referred to as "crossed-eyes" is an example of strabismus. The term strabismus applies to other types of misalignments, including an upward, downward, or outward turning eye. Amblyopia (aka lazy eye) occurs when the vision of one eye is significantly better than the other eye, and the brain begins to rely on the better eye and ignore the weaker one. Amblyopia affects 4% of the population and is clinically diagnosed when the refractive error of one eye is more than 1.5 diopters different than the other eye. The management of amblyopia involves correcting of significant refractive errors and using techniques that encourage the brain to pay attention to the weaker eye such as patching the stronger eye.(occlusion therapy) Blocked tear ducts. Ptosis Retinopathy of prematurity Nystagmus Visual inattention Pediatric cataracts Pediatric glaucoma Abnormal vision development
  12. 12. Genetic disorders often cause eye problems for affected children. Since approximately 30% of genetic syndromes affect the eyes, examination by a pediatric ophthalmologist can help with the diagnosis of genetic conditions. Many pediatric ophthalmologists participate with multidisciplinary medical teams that treat children with genetic syndromes. Congenital malformations affecting vision or the tear drainage duct system can be evaluated and possibly surgically corrected by a pediatric ophthalmologist. Orbital tumours Refractive errors such as myopia (near-sightedness) and astigmatism can often be corrected with prescriptions for glasses or contacts. Accommodative insufficiency Convergence insufficiency and asthenopia Evaluation of visual issues in education, including dyslexia and attention deficit disorder. PAEDIATRIC PROCEDURES AT DOCTOR EYE INSTITUTE INCLUDE TREATMENTS FOR: Strabismus Ptosis Refractive errors like farsightedness, nearsightedness, astigmatism Cataract Glaucoma
  13. 13. What is a corneal transplant? Is it safe? A corneal transplant involves replacing a diseased or scarred cornea with a new one. When the cornea becomes cloudy, light cannot penetrate the eye to reach the light-sensitive retina. Poor vision or blindness may result. In corneal transplant surgery, the surgeon removes the central portion of the cloudy cornea and replaces it with a clear cornea, usually donated through an eye bank. A trephine, an instrument like a cookie cutter, is used to remove the cloudy cornea. The surgeon places the new cornea in the opening and sews it with a very fine thread. The thread stays in for months or even years until the eye heals properly (removing the thread is quite simple and can easily be done in an ophthalmologist's office). Following surgery, eye drops to help promote healing will be needed for several months. The chances of success of this operation have risen dramatically because of technological advances, such as less irritating sutures, or threads, which are often finer than a human hair; and the surgical microscope. Corneal transplantation has restored sight to many, who a generation ago would have been blinded permanently by corneal injury, infection, or inherited corneal disease or degeneration.
  14. 14. What problems can develop from a corneal transplant? Even with a fairly high success rate, some problems can develop, such as rejection of the new cornea. Warning signs for rejection are decreased vision, increased redness of the eye, increased pain, and increased sensitivity to light. If any of these last for more than six hours, you should immediately call your ophthalmologist. Rejection can be successfully treated if medication is administered at the first sign of symptoms. A study supported by the National Eye Institute (NEI) suggests that matching the blood type, but not tissue type, of the recipient with that of the cornea donor may improve the success rate of corneal transplants in people at high risk for graft failure. Approximately 20 percent of corneal transplant patients--between 6000-8000 a year--reject their donor corneas. The NEI-supported study, called the Collaborative Corneal Transplantation Study, found that high-risk patients may reduce the likelihood of corneal rejection if their blood types match those of the cornea donors. The study also concluded that intensive steroid treatment after transplant surgery improves the chances for a successful transplant. Are there alternatives to a corneal transplant? Phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) is one of the latest advances in eye care for the treatment of corneal dystrophies, corneal scars, and certain corneal infections. Only a short time ago, people with these disorders would most likely have needed a corneal transplant. By combining the precision of the excimer laser with the control of a computer, doctors can vaporize microscopically thin layers of diseased corneal tissue and etch away the surface irregularities associated with many corneal dystrophies and scars. Surrounding areas suffer relatively little trauma. New tissue can then grow over the now-smooth surface. Recovery from the procedure takes a matter of days, rather than months as with a transplant

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