Content Management Without the Killing

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These don't make a huge amount of sense without the commentary. See http://allinthehead.com for a more formal write-up.

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Content Management Without the Killing

  1. 1. content management (without the killing) drew mclellan, edgeofmyseat.com
  2. 2. o hai!
  3. 3. edgeofmyseat.com a specialist web development agency experienced in building web applications from content management systems, e-commerce applications, to the systems that run your business.
  4. 4. so, content management then.
  5. 5. http://flickr.com/photos/hddod/536392298/
  6. 6. http://flickr.com/photos/neilw/138493599/
  7. 7. a tool for preparing eggs should be as simple as possible, but no simpler. - Eggbert Einstein
  8. 8. eggxactly.
  9. 9. “A boiled egg makes an almost perfect breakfast. It's the most nutritional breakfast money can buy. The downside is that it's a bit of a hassle to prepare. First you have to wait 5 minutes for the water to boil, place the egg in the boiling water, remembering to set the timer, fish it out when it's cooked and finally you have to wash up the pan.” - James Seddon
  10. 10. as simple as possible, but no simpler.
  11. 11. say when.
  12. 12. so controlling. you’re not the boss of me
  13. 13. you don’t understand my needs that’s all I’m saying
  14. 14. you’re not my type.
  15. 15. offline management
  16. 16. online management
  17. 17. build something, anything.
  18. 18. your site, your way.
  19. 19. it’s not you, it’s me.
  20. 20. common features.
  21. 21. /shiny/happy/urls
  22. 22. use readable, reliable and hackable URLs - Tom Coates
  23. 23. /news/technology/messy-urls-are-evil
  24. 24. data feeds
  25. 25. data stored in an open format
  26. 26. customisable and accessible administration interface
  27. 27. search
  28. 28. multi-site support
  29. 29. multi-language support
  30. 30. caching
  31. 31. web 2.0 features (cringe)
  32. 32. user generated content (cringe)
  33. 33. off the shelf systems
  34. 34. weblog management systems
  35. 35. weblog management systems • posts / articles • categories and tags • comments • sections • flat site structures • simple to set up and use
  36. 36. beware the pimped out blog site don’t launch a new site with a weblog cms already stretched to its limits.
  37. 37. case study webstandards.org
  38. 38. state of existing site • CVS proving too awkward for casual edits • Movable Type was painfully slow to publish • wanted the ability to turn on comments • considering a full redesign anyway
  39. 39. choice to use WordPress • continued to be free of charge • new ‘pages’ feature to handle site content • integrated blog • no republishing for comments • moderation and spam filtering • Matt Mullenweg was part of WaSP
  40. 40. lessons learned • dynamic rendering is a lot more expensive • the ‘pages’ feature was immature and slow
  41. 41. lessons learned • dynamic rendering is a lot more expensive • the ‘pages’ feature was immature and slow • hacking WordPress was a bad idea
  42. 42. solutions • unhack WordPress • re-implement our hacks with the plugin API • upgrade to faster hosting
  43. 43. avoid getting into an unsupportable configuration at all costs.
  44. 44. medium scale content management
  45. 45. medium scale features • weblogs, photo gallery, events calendar • user / membership systems • structure / hierarchy management tools • more powerful search • workflows • versioning
  46. 46. beware! • complicated way to cook an egg • more power results in less simplicity • set up / configuration • maintenance and patching • ease of use
  47. 47. enterprise level content management
  48. 48. building your own
  49. 49. case study edgeofmyseat.com cms platform
  50. 50. edgeofmyseat.com projects • content management at core • bespoke requirements on top • design-led • built for phased development & future expansion
  51. 51. our goals • reusable core functionality • avoid monotonous tasks • decrease the skill level required • be more competitive on smaller projects • structured data • high performance
  52. 52. buy or build?
  53. 53. we decided to build
  54. 54. platform • PHP 5.2, MySQL 4.1 • good performance • easy and inexpensive to host • inexpensive to develop • reliable • in house expertise
  55. 55. design decisions • flexible templating • multiple levels of caching • structured and extensible data types • embeddable applications • ability to exercise control of IA • simple administrative concepts
  56. 56. planning for the future
  57. 57. top tips
  58. 58. know your plugins authenticity, licensing & support
  59. 59. beware hidden costs update charges & maintenance time
  60. 60. be a licensing boffin know what you own & avoid lock-in
  61. 61. plan for the future don’t buy it today
  62. 62. don’t push the limits from day one leave room to expand
  63. 63. be aware of design constraints design for the platform you have
  64. 64. avoid per-user licensing you’re probably being ripped off
  65. 65. speak with existing customers (everyone hates their cms)
  66. 66. know your exit route understand the data import & export options
  67. 67. questions?
  68. 68. edgeofmyseat.com

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