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CityVerve Human Centred Design Induction

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CityVerve Human Centred Design, Induction Workshop, 27 July 2016

Selection of slides from the Human Centred Design induction workshop for project teams with whom FutureEverything will be working in CityVerve.

Authors: Drew Hemment, Simone Carrier, Matt Skinner

Published in: Design
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CityVerve Human Centred Design Induction

  1. 1. CityVerve 
 Human Centred Design Induction Induction Workshop, 27 July 2016
  2. 2. The objective over the next weeks: 
 To develop our ideas in the best possible way, so people will have a great experience using them.
  3. 3. What you get Human centred design methods and tools. Understanding of user needs. Insights on best practice and common barriers to user acceptance. Engagement with citizens and users, visibility and attention. What you give Time to attend human centred design workshops. Be ready to be challenged and adapt your solution to user feedback. Engage citizens as contributors and stakeholders. Be open and share learnings from the process. Human Centred Design Advice and Support Human centred design leads to products and services that are usable, 
 useful and likely to be used. CityVerve project teams will be introduced 
 to human centred and participatory design methods, and supported to 
 implement them during design, deployment and analysis.
  4. 4. FutureGov
 FutureGov the digital and design company for public services, are collaborating with FutureEverything on Human Centred Design support. Simone Carrier
 Head of Service Design Matt Skinner
 Head of Product Design Chris Evans
 Product Designer Drew Hemment
 Creative Director Daniel Santos
 Design Lead Vimla Appadoo
 Service Designer Feimatta Conteh
 Programme Manager Natalie Kane
 Curator and Editor Tom Rowlands
 Producer Callum Kirkwood
 Junior Producer Human Centred Design Team FutureEverything, Manchester’s innovation lab for digital culture and smarter cities, is lead on human centred design and culture & public realm in CityVerve.
  5. 5. Who are FutureEverything? MANCHESTER’S INNOVATION LAB FOR DIGITAL CULTURE. LEAD ON HUMAN CENTRED DESIGN AND 
 CULTURE & PUBLIC REALM IN CITYVERVE.
  6. 6. Who are FutureGov? WE ARE THE DIGITAL AND DESIGN COMPANY FOR PUBLIC SERVICES.
  7. 7. Introduction
  8. 8. WE, CITIZENS OF ALL CITIES, TAKE THE FATE OF THE PLACES WE LIVE IN INTO OUR OWN HANDS. WE CARE ABOUT THE BUILDINGS AND THE PARKS, THE SHOPS, THE SCHOOLS, THE ROADS AND THE TREES. BUT ABOVE ALL, WE CARE ABOUT THE QUALITY OF THE LIFE WE LIVE IN OUR CITIES. WE KNOW THAT OUR LIVES ARE INTERCONNECTED, AND WHAT WE DO HERE WILL IMPACT THE OUTCOMES OVER THERE. WHILE WE CAN NEVER PREDICT THE EVENTUAL EFFECT OF OUR ACTIONS, WE TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE THIS WORLD A BETTER PLACE. Frank Kresin, A Manifesto for Smart Citizens, in Drew Hemment & Anthony Townsend (eds), Smart Citizens, FutureEverything Publications, 2013 Smart Citizens We engage citizens as stakeholders and contributors not just users.
  9. 9. 01. DON’T BELIEVE THE HYPE 02. DESIGN USEFUL THINGS 03. AIM FOR THE WIN-WIN-WIN 04. KEEP EVERYONE AND EVERY THING SECURE 05. BUILD AND PROMOTE A CULTURE OF PRIVACY 06. BE DELIBERATE ABOUT WHAT DATA WE COLLECT 07. MAKE THE PARTIES ASSOCIATED WITH AN IOT PRODUCT EXPLICIT 08. EMPOWER USERS TO BE THE MASTERS OF THEIR OWN DOMAIN 09. DESIGN THINGS FOR THEIR LIFETIME 10. IN THE END, WE ARE HUMAN BEINGS iotmanifesto.org @iotmanifesto IoT Design Principles We will draw on and contribute to work on best practice so we can address barriers to user acceptance.
  10. 10. WE DESIGN USEFUL THINGS Value comes from products that are purposeful. Our commitment is to design products that have a meaningful impact on people’s lives; IoT technologies are merely tools to enable that.
  11. 11. WE ARE DELIBERATE ABOUT WHAT DATA WE COLLECT This is not the business of hoarding data; we only collect data that serves the utility of the product and service. Therefore, identifying what those data points are must be conscientious and deliberate.
  12. 12. WE BUILD AND PROMOTE A CULTURE OF PRIVACY Equally severe threats can also come from within. Trust is violated when personal information gathered by the product is handled carelessly. We build and promote a culture of integrity where the norm is to handle data with care.
  13. 13. WE EMPOWER USERS TO BE THE MASTERS OF THEIR OWN DOMAIN Users often do not have control over their role within the network of stakeholders surrounding an IoT product. We believe that users should be empowered to set the boundaries of how their data is accessed and how they are engaged with via the product.
  14. 14. Some IoT platforms are ‘citizen led’ – 
 made and maintained by a community of users
  15. 15. Maker culture Is there scope for people to contribute to and change your project?
  16. 16. Citizens as stakeholders? Taxi drivers on streets protest about Uber… NOT what success looks like!
  17. 17. Experimenting with the process all in one day The human centred design process
  18. 18. Outline of the program Intro to HCD Doing research with service users Analysing research and developing ideas Prototyping ideas and testing them with service users Creating a delivery plan 27/07 Teams work independently Teams work independently Teams work independently Teams work independently Teams indepen work dently Community Champions
  19. 19. Be aware: 
 It might feel a little uncomfortable at times. But it’ll be alright.
  20. 20. What makes the difference between good and bad design? The focus on people’s needs who are using the designs.
  21. 21. An example from the IOT world
  22. 22. Philips Hue
  23. 23. Philips Hue
  24. 24. The design process
  25. 25. If you asked a designer
  26. 26. CITIZENS MEANINGFULLY ENGAGED IN ‘OPEN PROTOTYPING’ The challenges Insight Definition ActionIdeas Embed DISCOVER DEFINE DEVELOP DEPLOY Speak to members of the public and professionals to understand what their needs are. Based on the gained insights, define the problem you want to focus on solving. Develop ideas and prototypes which respond to existing user needs in collaboration with service users. Implement a pilot version to learn from before thinking of scaling. MOBILISE Engage people, create relationships, build community. ITERATE Make changes and repeat the process, learning the whole time.
  27. 27. DESIGN IS AN ITERATIVE PROCESS ! MEASURE BUILD LEARN Design is not an linear process - it is iterative and agile
  28. 28. Design is not an linear process - it is iterative and agile MOBILISE DISCOVER DEFINE DEVELOP DELIVER DISCOVER DEFINE DEVELOP DELIVER DISCOVER DEFINE DEVELOP DELIVER
  29. 29. Mobilise
  30. 30. MOBILISE
 How do you engage users?
  31. 31. Users are people, just like you.
  32. 32. Community 
 Performance 
 Indictors Collaborate with citizens as stakeholders to define and measure success.
  33. 33. CITYVERVE COMMUNITY CHAMPIONS Local young people, trained in role play, facilitation and filmmaking
  34. 34. Supporting user research – workshops and role play to engage residents and service users
  35. 35. CITYVERVE CULTURE & PUBLIC REALM Art and experiences engaging the public in CityVerve
  36. 36. Art and experiences engaging the public in CityVerve CITYVERVE CULTURE & PUBLIC REALM
  37. 37. Discover
  38. 38. DISCOVER
 What is design research?
  39. 39. What is design research? It creates empathy. It helps to understand the problem you are trying to solve. It inspires new ideas. 

  40. 40. EMPATHY
  41. 41. UNDERSTANDING PRACTITIONERS “Understanding everything out there is overwhelming. I can’t do that at the same time as doing an assessment” Understanding practitioners and service providers as shortcut to users
  42. 42. Ethnographic research to understand citizens
  43. 43. Ethnographic research to understand citizens
  44. 44. Tips to “discover” Don’t consult - observe. Be curious and listen. Be brave and leave your desk.
  45. 45. What kind of research
 do you do in your everyday practise?
  46. 46. Define
  47. 47. DEFINE:
 Solving the right problem
  48. 48. UNPACKING INSIGHTS TO DEFINE A BRIEF Interpret your research Build insights. Share with others. Create an inspiring design brief.
  49. 49. A design brief How can we redesign a vase for flowers?
  50. 50. A better design brief How could we live with more plants inside our homes?
  51. 51. Creating a good design brief Original brief: 
 Solve youth unemployment in rural Albania. Refined brief: 
 How might we inspire young people in Albania to think about the dream job?
  52. 52. Tips to “define” Really understand the problem. Put the user in the centre. Avoid solutions.
  53. 53. What’s your experience with focusing on one problem at a time? Does it make things easier or more difficult?
  54. 54. Exercise: Discover Find out as much as you can about what your users current experience is. What is good about it? What are they struggling to do?
  55. 55. Plan your research Who are your users? What do you think you know already? Where will you find them? What do you want to find out? What open and interesting questions can you ask? 15 min
  56. 56. Go out, talk to people and document what was said Listen carefully. Ask why. 45 min
  57. 57. Welcome back! How was your experience?
  58. 58. Market Research What people say What people will buy Large sample sizes Broad insights Design Research What people do How people use a product / service Small sample sizes Deep, focused insight
  59. 59. FOR GREAT IDEAS GO DEEP – NOT WIDE ! For great ideas - go deep not wide
  60. 60. Source: Jakob Nielson & Tom Landauer Discovered Usability issues 0 3 6 9 12 15 25% 50% 75% 100% Amount of participants Source: Jakob Nielson & Tom Landauer Amount of participants Discovered usability issues Quality, not quantity
  61. 61. Exercise: Define Build insights from your research. Produce three design briefs phrased as “How might we” question. For example: “How might we make it easier for people to understand when it is safe to exercise outside?” 30 min
  62. 62. How might we… … make it easier … for Mancunians … to understand when it is safe to exercise outside? do what? for who? what for?
  63. 63. Develop & iterate ideas
  64. 64. DEVELOP IDEAS
 How to come up with good ideas?
  65. 65. How to come up with good 
 with ideas? 
 Agree on the problem you 
 want to solve. Aim high and go a little crazy.
  66. 66. HOW CAN THIS… Get inspired by things outside your sector
  67. 67. INFORM THIS?
  68. 68. BE OPEN TO MAD IDEAS (AT LEAST TO BEGIN WITH)
  69. 69. Tips to “develop ideas” Don’t do it alone. Visualize. Go for quantity. Judge later.
  70. 70. How do you come up with new ideas?
  71. 71. Exercise: Develop ideas Chose one of your “How-might-we” statements. Don’t restrain yourself and think wildly - create at least 6 ideas how to improve your existing idea and come up with a new one. Chose your best idea. 30 min
  72. 72. Deliver
  73. 73. DELIVER
 How to deliver quickly and well?
  74. 74. How to deliver quickly 
 an well? It’s not about delivering the perfect solution, but something you can get feedback on.
  75. 75. Fail early, fail often learn learn How to deliver quickly and well? Through agile delivery.
  76. 76. What a prototype might look like
  77. 77. Learn in a safe environment
  78. 78. Paper prototypes
  79. 79. Testing a service experience
  80. 80. Tips to “deliver” Be brave and share your work early. Seek feedback to iterate - (not to get a pad on your back).
  81. 81. How do you deliver projects? What’s your experience with starting small or agile delivery?
  82. 82. Exercise: Develop ideas You only have 20 minutes time and the materials available in the room - how would you start prototyping your idea? 20 min
  83. 83. But doesn’t this process make things more expensive? It’s less expensive than creating something people don’t want or can’t use.
  84. 84. Next steps
  85. 85. What we’d like you to do before we meet next time 1. Each team on Slack. 2. Plan your user research based on tools today. 3. Gather existing research and identify gaps.
  86. 86. What we’d like you to do before we meet next time 4. Could you find and identify a user to interview?
  87. 87. Next Time? 3 half days workshops with each team to go over research plans and go out and do more
  88. 88. Please leave some feedback for us.
  89. 89. Thank you!

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