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Baharul Lcd Addis 22 May 2008

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ICT for the Disabled : Convention on Rights of the Disabled: Addis Ababa, May 2008

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Baharul Lcd Addis 22 May 2008

  1. 1. ICT Opportunities and Challenges for Increasing Social Inclusion Dr Baharul Islam Chairman & CEO South Asia Development Gateway Guwahati (India) UN Convention on the Rights and Dignity of Persons with Disability: A call for action on poverty, discrimination and lack of access Addis Ababa, 19-22 May 2008
  2. 2. OUTLINE <ul><li>Emergence of “Information Society” </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge Economy </li></ul><ul><li>ICT as creators of another divide with new forms of exclusion. </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges thrown up by the ICT and Policy issues of inclusion/exclusion of persons with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>National policy perspectives from Africa and Asia </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities and the need to address the inclusion impacts of ICT diffusion </li></ul><ul><li>Pro-active action on poverty, lack of access to ICT avenues. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Information Society <ul><li>WSIS Declaration of Principles say Information Society should pay particular attention to the special needs of persons with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>It should address capacity building, and provides that the “use of ICTs in all stages of education, training and human resources development taking into account the special needs of persons with disabilities…etc. </li></ul><ul><li>ICT infrastructure should address the special requirements of persons with disabilities, using appropriate educational, administrative and legislative measures </li></ul><ul><li>WSIS-Tunis also advocated universal design concepts and the use of assistive technologies that helps persons with disabilities </li></ul>
  4. 4. Knowledge Economy <ul><li>In Knowledge Economies ICT has significant economic implications </li></ul><ul><li>Information goods and services are recognized as central components of the new economics of development </li></ul><ul><li>ICT catalysts for change and social re-engineering based on “accessibility for all” </li></ul><ul><li>Accessibility is not solely the concern of persons with disabilities </li></ul><ul><li>Equalization of opportunities by, for and with persons with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on service-side solutions rather than client-specific fixes to promote accessibility in the work place and among program constituencies. </li></ul><ul><li>Two challenges are - accessibility requires constant vigilance and always is &quot; under construction &quot;. </li></ul>
  5. 5. ICT as creators of another divide with new forms of exclusion <ul><li>The Digital Divide in 2025 (BT) digital exclusion as not having access to the internet at home. </li></ul><ul><li>Problems of access often associated with income and ability to pay for technology (home computing and internet access) but also issues such as disability and skills gaps. </li></ul><ul><li>Problems of engagement whereby people do not see the need to engage with new technology and do not perceive the benefits of the online world. </li></ul><ul><li>Digital optimists believe that convergence and the emergence of more user-friendly technology will diminish the impact of the digital divide going forward. </li></ul><ul><li>Digital pessimists question many of these assumptions. </li></ul><ul><li>The intangible nature of the digital divide means the problem is perceived to be less concrete and therefore less real. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Challenges thrown up by the ICT and Policy issues of inclusion/exclusion SOURCE: European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education Belgium (Flemish Community), Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden The general ICT policy includes statements of equity of educational opportunity with respect to and through the use of ICT Austria, Belgium, Cyprus (under development), Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, UK General – not special needs education specific – ICT policies that include statements and objectives on the five areas Evident in Element of ICT policy
  7. 7. SOURCE: European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education Austria, Belgium (Flemish Community), Denmark Finland, Greece, Ireland, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain (at a regional level), Sweden, Switzerland, UK Some form of evaluation of general ICT policy is being conducted Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK Different bodies are responsible for policy implementation Austria, Belgium (Flemish Community), Cyprus (applies to secondary and special schools only), Czech Republic, France, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Sweden, UK As an element of educational policy, ICT is embodied within the school curriculum that applies to all pupils, including those with SENs
  8. 8. SOURCE: European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK Policies have a direct impact upon a teacher’s access to training, support and information relating to ICT Czech Republic, Lithuania, Norway Policy is being implemented and evaluated via dedicated ICT projects at a national level Cyprus, Portugal, Slovakia ICT is incorporated as a particular element of national disability and SEN policy and legislation
  9. 9. National policy perspectives from Africa and Asia <ul><li>NICI Policies of Africa </li></ul><ul><li>ICT Policies of Asian Countries: UNESCAP Recommendations on Policy/Legislative Guidelines concerning ICT accessibility for Persons with Disabilities in the Asian and Pacific Region, June 2002. </li></ul><ul><li>Asian Tele-center survey </li></ul><ul><li>Community Access Centers in India </li></ul><ul><li>Community Access Centers in Africa </li></ul>
  10. 10. Opportunities of ICT diffusion
  11. 11. Pro-active action on poverty, lack of access to ICT avenues
  12. 12. <ul><li>Thank You </li></ul>

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