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Brand engagement with mobile gamification apps from a developer perspective

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Excelling at what your company offer is often synonymous of success, but having a loyal customer base is not easy. Applying gamification elements to products or services can help brands to keep customers engaged, but it's not exempt of risks. This talk will present an introduction to gamification and will show success stories, specially focusing on apps promoting a positive behaviour change. Manuel will also share some lessons learned from app development and what opportunities gamification can bring to multiple disciplines.

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Brand engagement with mobile gamification apps from a developer perspective

  1. 1. Brand engagement with mobile gamification apps from a developer perspective Manuel Martin Salvador R&D Engineer @ Base AI researcher @ Bournemouth University 05/12/2016 CMC Masterclass Series Bournemouth University
  2. 2. Outline 1. Introduction 2. Gamification 3. Apps encouraging a positive change 4. Lessons from a developer 5. Opportunities
  3. 3. Let’s play a game! 6 questions Every right answer = 1 point Prize = a box of Heroes (raffle between top winners) Self-assessment: please write down your answers
  4. 4. Introduction
  5. 5. Question #1: What is this logo? Introduction
  6. 6. Source The Logo Company
  7. 7. Branding ● Logo ● Colour scheme ● Font ● Language (formal, informal) ● Culture (e.g. open, cool, modern, formal) ● Physical shop: window and decoration ● Online shop: layout and images “Inconsistency is a brand killer” → Design brand guidelines Introduction
  8. 8. Question #2: What company has this tagline? “every little helps” Introduction
  9. 9. Loyalty Do people often think in your company when need to buy a product or hire a service? E.g. soft drink, detergent, barber shop, mobile phone Introduction
  10. 10. Engagement How often do customers interact with your brand? ● This will vary depending on the life span of the product (e.g. milk vs car) How do customers react when you offer something new? ● E.g. you may want to try a new Oreo’s flavour Introduction
  11. 11. Main challenges Brand recognition: can people identify my logo/tagline? Customer loyalty: how can I keep a customer and avoid him/her to go to a competitor? Customer engagement: how can I make customers like my brand and react positively to my offer? Introduction
  12. 12. Gamification
  13. 13. Definition “Gamification is the use of game-design elements and game principles in non-game contexts.” Deterding et al. From game design elements to gamefulness: defining "gamification". MindTrek 2011 Gamification
  14. 14. Main applications Marketing: loyalty (e.g. Tesco Clubcard), customer engagement. Workplace: motivate employees to complete tasks. Education: encourage students to learn. Health: encourage people to exercise more (e.g. Fitbit). Crowdsourcing: collect hard-to-get information from many users (e.g. Foursquare). Gamification
  15. 15. Point system Users get points based on their actions You can choose a word that fits well within your strategy (e.g. coins, health points, experience points) Source Gamification
  16. 16. Incentives / Rewards Give value to the points (e.g. 1000 points = £10 voucher) Known rewards (rules) ● E.g. get a free coffee with 300 points Unexpected rewards (because reasons) ● E.g. happy birthday! Have a free cookie on us! Gamification Source
  17. 17. Leaderboards Being part of a community Competitive: beat your friends Refresh it periodically (e.g. every week) to avoid frustration Gamification Source
  18. 18. Badges People like collecting things Don’t confuse badges with value Gamification
  19. 19. Unlock achievements Set stages to complete (e.g. level 1 in Spanish) Feeling of progressing Gamification
  20. 20. Risks If used badly, gamification has the potential to be counterproductive Moral drift / cheating Addictive behaviour Illusion of fun: Just pretending something is fun does not make it fun. Anxiety vs Boredom More Gamification
  21. 21. Flow Mihály Csíkszentmihályi Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, 1990 Source (too easy) (too hard) Gamification
  22. 22. Apps encouraging a positive change
  23. 23. Change of behaviour Most humans try to avoid boring or difficult tasks Learning a new skill or create a new habit take time Apps encouraging a positive change
  24. 24. Question #3 How much time does it take to create a new habit? Apps encouraging a positive change
  25. 25. Change of behaviour Most humans try to avoid boring or difficult tasks Learning a new skill or create a new habit take time: ● 21 days to build a new habit (Maxwell Maltz. Psycho-Cybernetics, A New Way to Get More Living Out of Life, 1960) ● 66 days to build a new habit (Lally et al. How are habits formed: Modelling habit formation in the real world, 2009) Apps encouraging a positive change
  26. 26. Wellness / Fitness Nike+ Fitocracy Apps encouraging a positive change
  27. 27. Environment Oroeco Recyclebank Apps encouraging a positive change
  28. 28. Public Transport Apps encouraging a positive change My Open Road SASAbus
  29. 29. Productivity Habitica Supper Better Apps encouraging a positive change
  30. 30. Finances Smarty Pig Mint Apps encouraging a positive change
  31. 31. Question #4: What’s the name of this app? Apps encouraging a positive change
  32. 32. Education Duolingo Brilliant Khan Academy Apps encouraging a positive change
  33. 33. Lessons from a developer
  34. 34. I want to gamify my business What’s your goal? What’s your budget? Do you have an app? A. My app is my business B. My app is a complement to my business C. I don’t have an app Lessons from a developer
  35. 35. “The perfect plan” Source Lessons from a developer
  36. 36. Be Agile Source Lessons from a developer
  37. 37. Be Agile Lessons from a developer
  38. 38. Notifications Don’t abuse Smart notifications: notify at the right moment (e.g. Subway does at lunch time) Lessons from a developer
  39. 39. UX / Design Make your gamification strategy consistent with your brand Lessons from a developer
  40. 40. User feedback Listen to your users (and answer them) Accept critics → Improve Help to prioritise roadmap Lessons from a developer
  41. 41. Question #5: What’s the Android market share in UK? Source
  42. 42. Question #5: What’s the Android market share in UK? Source
  43. 43. Track everything* Analyse events and flows Source Fabric Lessons from a developer * Everything you need
  44. 44. Privacy Respect people's privacy. Not everybody wants to share his/her progress. Check the Data Protection Act (in the UK) and international legislation if you operate abroad. Be specially careful when you audience are kids Lessons from a developer Source
  45. 45. Backwards compatibility People don’t update apps as often as developers would like Source Oct 2016 Lessons from a developer Question #6: In what year was Windows 7 launched?
  46. 46. Backwards compatibility People don’t update apps as often as developers would like Source Oct 2016 2009! 2011! Lessons from a developer
  47. 47. Opportunities
  48. 48. Is gamification dead? Opportunities 2015 2016 ?
  49. 49. Steady rise in the market growth 2012: $242 million 2015: $1700 million 2016: $2800 million Source It’s effective! ● Domino’s Pizza: created the gaming app Pizza Hero and increased sales revenue by 30% by letting customers create their own pizza with an app. ● Popchips: uses games to personalize mobile advertising and has seen its sales rise 40% leading to $100 million in sales. ● Bell Media: increased customer retention by 33% by incorporating “social loyalty” rewards on its website. Source Gamification is here to stay Source Opportunities Interest over time
  50. 50. Multidisciplinary Psychology Software developers Marketing (e.g. increase brand awareness, re-engage with users) HR (e.g. increase productivity, engage employees with some activities) Opportunities
  51. 51. Think out of the box Tram in Amsterdam (Daniel Disselkoen)Piano stairs in Brussels (Dole) Opportunities 66% more people used the stairs!
  52. 52. Thanks! Email manuel@wearebase.com msalvador@bournemouth.ac.uk Twitter: @draxus Who’s the winner?

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