8 Essential Roles within Strong Teams

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  • Today we are going to be taking a look at your Health & Safety Management Systems. We are going to be looking at the Structure of Health & Safety Legislation and reviewing Internal Responsibility System as it related to this presentation. We also will be taking a look how the legislation shapes the System Application in your workplace and how will impact how you communicate in the workplace.
  • “A real team is made up of a group of people who share a passion for a common and collective goal. They know that achieving the goal demands a high level of interdependency amongst team members, as it is something that can only be accomplished together. There are also clear and stable expectations so that membership is not constantly changing, and it is easy to tell who is on the team.”- Adapted from J. Richard Hackman, Groups that Work (and Those that Don’t)
  • When teams are working well, they create synergy by having multiple people with different skills and abilities converge on a specific problem or opportunity. Simply translated, synergy means that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. When a team is put into place - especially a team dialed-in for success - it increases the chance to maximize synergy. Maximizing synergy gives your organization the opportunity to accomplish more with the same number of people.When teams aren’t functioning well, not only do organizations lose synergy, they actually find the whole to be less than the sum of its parts. This situation has a suffocating effect on productivity that directly affects bottom-line performance.
  • Functional teams perform specific organizational functions and include members from several vertical levels of the hierarchy. In other words, a functional team is composed of a manager and his or her subordinates for a particular functional area. Accounting, personnel, and purchasing departments are examples of functional teams.Cross-functional teams are made up of experts in various specialties (or functions) working together on various organizational tasks. Team members come from such departments as research and development, design, engineering, marketing, and distribution. These teams are often empowered to make decisions without the approval of management. Self-directed work teams, operate without managers and are responsible for complete work processes or segments that deliver products or services to external or internal customers. Self-directed work teams (SDWTs) are designed to give employees a feeling of “ownership” of a whole job. Virtual Teams - Virtual teams consist of individuals who are separated by distances and connected through computer. Here individuals communicate with each other online through internet. Sam at Los Angeles can form a team with Mandy at Mexico and Sara at Denver all working for a common objective but the communication is totally digital through internet. Such teams are helpful when employees need to connect with each other and are located at different places.
  • • Has a clear and unifying goal for which each team member has passion for• Each member of the team is doing what they love to do - leveraging their strengths and talents • Is solution focused—always asking the question, “How can we?” • Consistently achieves extraordinary results • Positive, exciting, engaging team culture that supports the free flow of ideas and creativity • Team members regularly acknowledge each other’s contributions and also deliver honest, timely feedback in the spirit of continuous improvement • Team members make the effort to get to know each other very well • Demonstrate high levels of trust in each other
  • • walking into a room with a dysfunctional team feels like walking into a mine field!!!!Team goal is unclear so individual goals become paramount (e.g. getting a promotion) • Work is not enjoyable; it becomes a boring, necessary evil • Problem focused; always looking for what will go wrong and all the reasons for “why we can’t” • Business results are mediocre at best and often go unmeasured • Negative, blame-based culture that stifles new ideas due to the fear of “looking bad” • Team members regularly engage in “closed door sessions” and complaining around the water cooler about the work and each other • Team members stay distant, choosing not to get to know each other outside of roles/functions • Demonstrate low levels of trust in the motivations and intentions of other team members
  • Clear, unifying goals give the team a reason for being, and bringing individual members together for a common purpose. They also provide a sense of direction and a reference point from which to measure their progress.It is important to understand that in a team setting, both individual and group goals exist. The group goals must be relevant to the individual goals of members. Team members try to achieve both individual and team goals. The degree to which they can accomplish this has a positive effect on the success of the team. Without a common, unifying team goal, people often work for their individual goals (job promotion for example) in order to fulfill personal satisfaction. Teams without goals have higher stress, are more error-prone and uncooperative. These conditions lead to frustration and, ultimately, to team breakdown.To find out if your team has a clear, unifying goal, ask the individual members to write down on a piece of paper what they believe is the most important goal of the team. Collect all the papers and read out what has been written. If the answers are consistently the same and aligned with what you believe the goal of the team to be, you are well on your way. If not, then you need to establish a clear, unifying goal that is universally understood.
  • Leaders of companies that go from good to great start... by getting the right people on the bus, the wrong people off the bus, and the right people in the right seats.”- Jim Collins, Good to Great A thriving team - one that creates magic - has the right people in place, doing the right things. Using a sports team analogy, players are selected with specific skills and attributes that enable them to play their roles perfectly. In football, offensive linemen are picked for their strength, size and agility, all to enable the quarterback (picked for his judgment, throwing ability and courage) to excel in his position. When the quar­terback excels, the team usually does very well.
  • What are your Team’s High Traits?What are your Team’s Low Traits?In what areas is your Team ‘flexing’ the most? What are the strengths associated with your Team Composite?What are the weaknesses associated with your Team Composite?What are the consequences of your Team’s Strengths and Weaknesses?Understanding personality styles is the secret to effective leadership and communication!Make an effort to recognize different personality stylesUnderstand yourself, others and your teamLearn to adjust your personality and behavioursPut it into practice!
  • This role is about turning ideas that come from the team or individuals into practical, workable and well-organized outcomes. People in this role are very effective when the tasks have known precedents; clear-cut guidelines and the outcomes of the work are usually concrete and measurable. This role is useful when the team needs a plan quickly to get started on a project.
  • People in this role have a prime concern for how the team works together to achieve its goals. Their focus is on ensuring that the gifts and talents of the individuals within the group are optimized. This role is needed when the team has become over-reliant on a few individuals and needs to draw out the contributions of everyone.
  • In this role, individuals derive considerable satisfaction from the process of finding new ways of doing things - often dreaming up innovative angles, concepts and techniques. They are likely to be unconcerned with practical details. This role is needed when the team’s objective is to develop a product or service requiring unusual solutions.
  • These individuals are essentially lively communicators who easily make contact with many different people - finding out who is doing what, who knows what, who controls what - and drawing upon them as resources. They are likely to be enthusiastic starters of projects, and when enthused, are likely to be excellent at enthusing others. This role is needed when the success of the team is predicated ontheir ability to work with and access support from other internal organizations or external parties.
  • This is the calm critic. They have sound judgment, understand what makes things work and what stops them from working, and will be quick to point out the flaws in plans and ideas. This aptitude makes them a major source of quality control. This is a needed role on projects where there is a high cost to mistakes. They will have a particular contribution to make when the work process or product is at a stage where it must be checked out to ensure that it is realistic, practicable, consistent, of high quality, and immune to logical criticisms.
  • These people gain considerable personal satisfaction from maintaining and improving human relations within the group, thus promoting team spirit. They will normally be somewhat outgoing, supportive, considerate, and good listeners. They will draw the best from individuals and; indeed, teams that contain several Supportive types are often very effective teams, even where their level of expertise is low. This role is useful when the team works together on a long-term basis - when the possibility of losing momentum increases with time.
  • These people tend to be highly attentive to detail, and generally tidy, meticulous, orderly and conscientious. Their major drive is to get things ‘just so’, and they will spend much of their energy keeping an eye on detail, the small print, and time urgencies. The Detail Type is needed in those situations requiring particular attention and quality control.
  • There is no such thing as a high performance team without great leadership. Teams need a framework of ground rules for which to operate. They want clear direction.It is the job of the leader to create an environment where the team members can do their best work. What makes a great leader is the right balance of task and relationship orientation.
  • Understanding personality styles is the secret to effective leadership and communication!Make an effort to recognize different personality stylesUnderstand yourself, others and your teamLearn to flex your personality and behavioursPut it into practice!
  • 8 Essential Roles within Strong Teams

    1. 1. For audio, it is recommended you dial in A copy of the slides + recording will be available post webinar AUDIO: 1-877-668-4493 Access Code: 667 945 794 Event Password: 1234 WebEx Support: 1-866-863-39108 Necessary Roles Within All Strong Teams February 20, 2013Presented by: Maysa Hawwash, National Manager – Talent Management Solutions
    2. 2. AgendaWhat is a Team?Why a Team?Types of TeamsLet’s Talk Personality8 Essential RolesEffective Tools
    3. 3. What is a Team?“A real team is made up of a group of people who share apassion for a common and collective goal”- Adapted from J. Richard Hackman, Groups that Work(and Those that Don’t) 3
    4. 4. Why a Team?• Creates synergy  Contributions as a whole are greater than the sum of its parts• Maximizing synergy• Directly affects bottom-line performance 4
    5. 5. Types of Teams• Permanent/Functional Teams• Cross Functional Teams• Self Directed Teams• Virtual Teams 5
    6. 6. High Performing TeamsHigh Performing Teams• Clear and unifying goal• Leverage strengths and talents• Solutions-focused• Consistently achieves extraordinary results• Engaged team culture• Regular acknowledgement• High levels of trust 6
    7. 7. Dysfunctional TeamsUnder-Performing Teams• Unclear goals• Work is not enjoyable• Problem-focused• Mediocre results• Negative, blame-based culture• “Closed Door Sessions”• Distant team members• Low levels of trust 7
    8. 8. The Power of Alignment• Clear goals and a common purpose• Individual and group goals CAN co-existTry this exercise:Ask the individual members to write down on a piece ofpaper what they believe is the most important goal of theteam. Collect all the papers and read out what has beenwritten. 8
    9. 9. Team Composition“Leaders of companies that go from good to great start…bygetting the right people on the bus, the wrong people offthe bus, and the right people in the right seats.”- Jim Collins, Good to Great 9
    10. 10. Selection of Team Members• What are your team’s core competencies?• What are the gaps?• Who is the unofficial leader in your team?• Is there an alignment between personal and group goals?• Is your compensation strategy aligned with what you want the team to achieve?• What are the consequences of your team’s Strengths and Weaknesses? 10
    11. 11. 8 Essential Roles of Strong Teams1. Practical2. Consulting3. Driving4. Creative5. Catalyst6. Critical Judge7. Supportive8. Detailed 11
    12. 12. 8 Essential Roles – Practical• Turn ideas into practical, workable, well-organized outcomes• Useful when getting started on a project quickly 12
    13. 13. 8 Essential Roles – Consulting• Concerned about how team works together towards achieving goals• Useful for drawing out everyone’s contributions. 13
    14. 14. 8 Essential Roles – Driving• Pushes all individuals towards meeting objectives.• Useful when performing on tight deadlines. 14
    15. 15. 8 Essential Roles – Creative• Finds new ways of performing tasks.• Useful in developing products or services that require unusual solutions. 15
    16. 16. 8 Essential Roles – Catalyst• Lively communicator who finds out who is doing what, who knows what, and who controls what.• Useful when projects require additional support from external parties. 16
    17. 17. 8 Essential Roles – Critical Judge• Calm critic who quickly points out the flaws in plans and ideas.• Useful on projects where there is a high cost if mistakes are made. 17
    18. 18. 8 Essential Roles – Supportive• Promotes team spirit by maintaining and improving human relations within the group.• Useful when team works together on a long-term basis, when the possibility of losing momentum increases with time. 18
    19. 19. 8 Essential Roles – Detailed• Highly attentive to detail, orderly, and generally conscientious.• Useful when providing quality control/assurance on a project. 19
    20. 20. Choosing the Right Leader• Get the right people on the bus• Clear direction• Creates an environment that fosters synergy• Right balance of task and relationship orientation• Able to leverage the strengths within their teams, and look for ways to fill the gaps 20
    21. 21. Tools for Better Teams• Personality Assessments• Team Communication Profiles and Reports• 360 as a feedback tool 21
    22. 22. Team Communication Report• Work more effectively with the individual members of your team.• Learn how to adjust your behaviours for optimal communication• Create a more open, positive relationship with your team members.• Maximize your influence when communicating with peers, team members and your manager 22
    23. 23. Trait Interaction with your Team Members - Sample• DOMINANCE: Both you and Jane have Dominance above the midline. Because you are accountable for improved communication, you should stretch your Dominance lower and allow Jane to feel more in control of your interactions. you need to remember that it will be important to focus on getting results. 23
    24. 24. Trait Interaction with your Team Members - Sample• EXTROVERSION: Both your and Janes Extroversion are above the midline. You should be able to communicate effectively and enjoy the process. However, you will need to be accountable for bringing discussions to a successful and timely conclusion. You must ensure that socializing and other digressions do not side-track discussions. 24
    25. 25. Trait Interaction with your Team Members - Sample• PATIENCE: Both your and Janes Patience are above the midline. Since you are accountable for the success of the communication, you will need to stretch your Patience lower and move the discussion along. Probe to discover Janes concerns regarding timing - and then position yourself accordingly. 25
    26. 26. Trait Interaction with your Team Members - Sample• CONFORMITY: Your Conformity trait is above the midline while Janes Conformity is below. Jane is an independent and creative thinker who resists being bound by structure. Occasionally, you will need to gently remind Jane of your organizations standard operating procedures. If you feel you must discuss details and systems, focus on how they fit into Janes "big picture." 26
    27. 27. How does a Team Communication Report help?• Understand your team’s priorities• Learn how to create rapport with team members• Learn how to communicate effectively through adjusting your style• Determine the sensitive areas to consider and/or avoid 27
    28. 28. In ConclusionStrong teams don’t just happen, they are a result of adeliberate process that involves the following: – Selection of team members according to competencies needed for type of team – Understanding of individual’s goals and priorities to create an alignment with team goals – Adjusting communication style to effectively motivate and drive the right behaviours – Leveraging team member’s strengths 28
    29. 29. Questions8 Essential Roles Q&A Within Strong with Maysa Hawwash, National Manager, Teams Talent Management Solutions 29
    30. 30. Free Offer• We’re offering a free 60-minute Team Consultation that can include:  Exploring current challenges within your team  Effective team communication strategies  Learning the different functions within your teamContact Maysa to take advantage of this exclusive offer!mhawwash@na.drakeintl.com416.216.1067 30
    31. 31. Upcoming WebinarsRegister at http://drake-webinars.comMarch 13, 12pm EST10 Essentials to Managing the Employment RelationshipPresented by: Matthew Vella – Vella Labour LawApril 10, 12pm ESTDeath of an Employment RelationshipPresented by: Matthew Vella – Vella Labour Law 31
    32. 32. Drake Mobile 32
    33. 33. Thank You for AttendingFor questions, please contact Maysa Hawwash mhawwash@na.drakeintl.com 416.216.1067 33

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