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PART I:
Understanding Socialization &
Cultural Norms
● variety or difference; the fact
or quality of being diverse
● with people – often refers to
cultural diversity
Diversity
Who Are You?
Stereotype, Prejudice, &
Discrimination
Oppression & Power
“The prejudice and discrimination of one
social group against another, backed by
institutional power. O...
“Privilege exists when one group has
something of value that is denied to
others simply because of the groups
they belong ...
PART II:
WHOMakes up the LGBTQ Community
● Because all stigmatized groups face unique problems &
challenges
● Because these problems & challenges can have a lot to...
L- Lesbian
G- Gay
B- Bisexual
T-Transgender
T-Transsexual
T-Two Spirited
Q- Queer
Q- Questioning
What does LGBTQ mean?
● Different terms in different communities
● Terms are always changing
● Self definition
● In group/out group words
Terms ...
Biological Sex – refers to your biological make-up, either male
or female.
Gender – social construction of biological sex....
Homophobia means a "fear of or contempt for homosexuality or
homosexuals" or the fear of becoming homosexual.
Heterosexism...
 “Homosexual Lifestyle” or “Gay Lifestyle” – These phrases tend to trivialize sexual
orientation.
 “Sexual/Gender Identi...
Respect how people choose to name themselves.
Remember that you are human and you will make
mistakes.
Be determined to ...
PART III:
Issues & Risks LGBTQ
Students Face
● Homosexuality was removed as a psychiatric disorder from the
DSM in 1974
● Being LGBT does not mean you have a mental il...
● Double stigma
● Shame
● Judgment
● Harassment
● Heterosexism
Issues LGBTQ Students face
● Homophobia
● Ostracism
● Rejec...
Risks at School
LGBTYouth are four times more likely to attempt suicide than
heterosexual youth.
Resiliency
Emotional and physical “survival skills”
Increased appreciation for family/community
Greater sense of personal ...
Need to be understood
Need to be supported
Need to be accepted for who they are
Need to feel safe and secure
Need to feel ...
PART IV:
Promoting Resiliency
1. Understand the complex social structures that exist to
drive the Cycle of Privilege and Oppression.
2. Know who makes u...
Stages of LGBTQ Cultural Competency
to Promote Resiliency
An inclusive climate is one in which all staff
and students feel valued and have the same
opportunities to achieve their a...
Be an ALLY!
1) Be VISIBLE
2) SUPPORT all students
3) RESPOND to anti-LGBTQ words/actions
4) LISTEN
5) LEARN more
Questions?
Lgbtqia gcs mental_health_summit_draft_1
Lgbtqia gcs mental_health_summit_draft_1
Lgbtqia gcs mental_health_summit_draft_1
Lgbtqia gcs mental_health_summit_draft_1
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Lgbtqia gcs mental_health_summit_draft_1

  1. 1. PART I: Understanding Socialization & Cultural Norms
  2. 2. ● variety or difference; the fact or quality of being diverse ● with people – often refers to cultural diversity Diversity
  3. 3. Who Are You?
  4. 4. Stereotype, Prejudice, & Discrimination
  5. 5. Oppression & Power “The prejudice and discrimination of one social group against another, backed by institutional power. Oppression occurs when one group is able to enforce its prejudice and discrimination throughout society because it controls the institutions” (Sensoy & DiAngelo, 2012, 40). Categories of Oppression: •exploitation •marginalization •powerlessness •cultural imperialism •violence
  6. 6. “Privilege exists when one group has something of value that is denied to others simply because of the groups they belong to, rather than because of anything they’ve done or failed to do” (Johnson, 2006, 21). Privilege “A systematically conferred dominance and the institutional processes by which the beliefs and values of the dominant group are ‘made normal” and universal. The key criterion is social and institutional power” (Sensoy & DiAngelo, 2012, 57).
  7. 7. PART II: WHOMakes up the LGBTQ Community
  8. 8. ● Because all stigmatized groups face unique problems & challenges ● Because these problems & challenges can have a lot to do with their mental health & mental illness ● Because if we understand these problems & challenges we can help our students understand & address them ● Because they’re key to real understandings & solutions ● Because no doing so means students remain at risk for relapse for both psychiatric symptoms & substance abuse Why Even talk about sexuality & gender identity?
  9. 9. L- Lesbian G- Gay B- Bisexual T-Transgender T-Transsexual T-Two Spirited Q- Queer Q- Questioning What does LGBTQ mean?
  10. 10. ● Different terms in different communities ● Terms are always changing ● Self definition ● In group/out group words Terms and Definitions
  11. 11. Biological Sex – refers to your biological make-up, either male or female. Gender – social construction of biological sex. • “I was born a baby, not a boy.” –Janet Mock •Transgender and Genderqueer – these identities do not always have to do with sexual orientation. Definitions to Understand
  12. 12. Homophobia means a "fear of or contempt for homosexuality or homosexuals" or the fear of becoming homosexual. Heterosexism describes the presumption that everyone is heterosexual & that heterosexuality is the norm. Most “ism’s” are learned and not intentional. Definitions to Understand
  13. 13.  “Homosexual Lifestyle” or “Gay Lifestyle” – These phrases tend to trivialize sexual orientation.  “Sexual/Gender Identity Confusion” – These terms should not be used to describe conflict or ambivalence about sexual orientation.  “Sexual Preference” – Sexual orientation is a complex bio-psycho-social phenomenon, not merely a preference, such as preferring red wine to white wine. This would imply choice, and there is evidence to support the fact that sexual orientation is an inherent quality of everyone’s being.
  14. 14. Respect how people choose to name themselves. Remember that you are human and you will make mistakes. Be determined to keep on learning.
  15. 15. PART III: Issues & Risks LGBTQ Students Face
  16. 16. ● Homosexuality was removed as a psychiatric disorder from the DSM in 1974 ● Being LGBT does not mean you have a mental illness, although there are many societal and internal stressors that may contribute to depression, anxiety and other mental health symptoms ● Do not recommend therapy or counseling to a youth without identifying the purpose, i.e. acceptance, coping skills, substance abuse, etc LGBTQ and Mental Health
  17. 17. ● Double stigma ● Shame ● Judgment ● Harassment ● Heterosexism Issues LGBTQ Students face ● Homophobia ● Ostracism ● Rejection ● Exploitation ● Oppression
  18. 18. Risks at School
  19. 19. LGBTYouth are four times more likely to attempt suicide than heterosexual youth.
  20. 20. Resiliency Emotional and physical “survival skills” Increased appreciation for family/community Greater sense of personal insight/understanding Courage Strengths of LGBT Students
  21. 21. Need to be understood Need to be supported Need to be accepted for who they are Need to feel safe and secure Need to feel loved unconditionally Need to feel whole as a person Need opportunities to succeed Need to find their voice Need to know they are not alone THESE NEEDS ARE NO DIFFERENT THAN THE NEEDS OF ALL HUMAN BEINGS Common Needs for LGBT Students
  22. 22. PART IV: Promoting Resiliency
  23. 23. 1. Understand the complex social structures that exist to drive the Cycle of Privilege and Oppression. 2. Know who makes up the LGBTQ Community. 3. Examine your own beliefs. 4. Recognize the issues and risks that LGBTQ youth face. 5. Work towards LGBTQ Cultural Competency: ● Make yourself a visible member of the LGBTQ community or as an ally ● Don’t assume heterosexuality ● Use affirming & inclusive language ● Educate yourself about LGBTQ issues ● Explore ways to creatively integrate WhatYOU Can do!
  24. 24. Stages of LGBTQ Cultural Competency to Promote Resiliency
  25. 25. An inclusive climate is one in which all staff and students feel valued and have the same opportunities to achieve their academic potential. Developing an inclusive climate is about identifying and proactively tackling any barriers that might prevent groups of people from being fully engaged or being able to fulfill their academic potential. What is an Inclusive Climate?
  26. 26. Be an ALLY! 1) Be VISIBLE 2) SUPPORT all students 3) RESPOND to anti-LGBTQ words/actions 4) LISTEN 5) LEARN more
  27. 27. Questions?

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