Everyday dilemmas

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NACADA 2012 Region 6 Conference

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Everyday dilemmas

  1. 1. Everyday Dilemmas: WHAT IS YOUR ETHICAL STYLE? Drew Puroway University of St. Thomas
  2. 2. What is Ethics?World English Dictionary accessed online via: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Ethics 1. ( functioning as singular ) See also meta-ethics the philosophical study of the moral value of human conduct and of the rules and principles that ought to govern it; moral philosophy 2. ( functioning as plural ) a social, religious, or civil code of behaviour considered correct, esp that of a particular group, profession, or individual 3. ( functioning as plural ) the moral fitness of a decision, course of action, etc: he doubted the ethics of their verdict
  3. 3. “Briefly put, ethics is the attempt to thinkcritically about what is right and what iswrong, what is good and what is bad, in humanconduct...Ethics asks not only what is the rightthing to do? but also How does one knowwhat is the right thing to do” (Gordon, Habley,Grites, & Associates, 2008, p. 37).
  4. 4. HaroldHarold is a twenty year old transfer student, about to enter hissecond semester at your institution. When he first met withyou as a newly admitted student, his mother came along and satin on the appointment where you discussed the curricularrequirements and assisted him with registration. While it iscommon for a traditional-aged transfer student to bring a parentto their initial appointment, you are a bit shocked when shearrives with Harold for his next appointment. You rememberfrom your first interaction that, while his mother was a verypleasant person, she dominated the conversation and was veryjudgmental of his ideas about possible majors. You worry thatHarold’s mother may be unintentionally impeding hisdevelopment and undermining his autonomy.Do you allow Harold’s mother into the appointment?
  5. 5. Principle Based Approach Problem or dilemma  Where do we get them? oriented  Someone who “views Can be said of the three moral norms as central” styles to be the  Principles leave room for modernist approach – judgment think enlightenment  Do you subscribe to Focused on Actions principles that proscribe Two fundamental actions and/or shape questions: your behavior? What are the principles?
  6. 6. Principle Based ApproachAdvantages: Criticisms: Concrete  Who sets? Might have flexibility  What do we do when Professional principles conflict? organization provides  Interests of individual vs. interests of the community  Rigidity
  7. 7. Harold Harold is a twenty year old transfer student, about to enter his second semester at your institution. When he first met with you as a newly admitted student, his mother came along and sat in on the appointment where you discussed the curricular requirements and assisted him with registration. While it is common for a traditional-aged transfer student to bring a parent to their initial appointment, you are a bit shocked when she arrives with Harold for his next appointment. You remember from your first interaction that, while his mother was a very pleasant person, she dominated the conversation and was very judgmental of his ideas about possible majors. You worry that Harold’s mother may be unintentionally impeding his development and undermining his autonomy. What principles might be at play in this case? What policies, institutional values or common practices might guide your actions? Is there a way to respect Harold’s Autonomy and respect his mother at the same time?
  8. 8. Situation Based Approach You look at cases to explore that paradigm Post-modern Inductive – or bottom up approach Can involve a principle but that is not the focus The particulars of the case itself and not the moral norms are of the greatest concern Process:  Describe the unique features of the case – clarity of facts  Place the case into a context of similar cases  Evaluate the movement between different cases
  9. 9. Situation Based ApproachAdvantages: Criticisms: Allows for revision  Highly relativistic Avoids making humans  Individual v. “slaves to the law or Community principles”  From where can its Avoids rigidity moral authority be derived?
  10. 10. Harold Harold is a twenty year old transfer student, about to enter his second semester at your institution. When he first met with you as a newly admitted student, his mother came along and sat in on the appointment where you discussed the curricular requirements and assisted him with registration. While it is common for a traditional-aged transfer student to bring a parent to their initial appointment, you are a bit shocked when she arrives with Harold for his next appointment. You remember from your first interaction that, while his mother was a very pleasant person, she dominated the conversation and was very judgmental of his ideas about possible majors. You worry that Harold’s mother may be unintentionally impeding his development and undermining his autonomy. What precedents or cases might guide your actions? Are there circumstances or is there information that would change your mind about this case? Is there a way to respect Harold’s Autonomy and respect his mother at the same time?
  11. 11. Virtue Based Approach Qualitatively different Focuses more on states of being rather than doing Pre-modern mindset Examples of virtues: Loyalty; Honesty; Kindness; Temperance In this system of ethics, the right action taken for the wrong reason is not virtuous Communally based or focused than problem based approaches
  12. 12. Harold Harold is a twenty year old transfer student, about to enter his second semester at your institution. When he first met with you as a newly admitted student, his mother came along and sat in on the appointment where you discussed the curricular requirements and assisted him with registration. While it is common for a traditional-aged transfer student to bring a parent to their initial appointment, you are a bit shocked when she arrives with Harold for his next appointment. You remember from your first interaction that, while his mother was a very pleasant person, she dominated the conversation and was very judgmental of his ideas about possible majors. You worry that Harold’s mother may be unintentionally impeding his development and undermining his autonomy. How ought one act in this situation? What does that virtue mean? What does the community of advisors expect? Do you have just intentions?
  13. 13. What informs our Ethics?
  14. 14. Ethical ChecklistBlanchard & Peale (1988) Is it Legal? Will I be violating civil law or institutional policy? Is it balanced? Is it fair to all concerned? Does it promote a win/win situation? How will it make me feel about myself? Will I be proud? Would I feel good if my hometown newspaper published my decision? Would I feel good if my family know about my choice?
  15. 15. Non-maleficence Enhance the student’s ability to make autonomous decisions Seek to enhance the student’s learning whenever possible Accord colleagues appropriate professional courtesy and respect
  16. 16. Beneficence Enhance the student’s ability to make autonomous decisions Seek to enhance the student’s learning whenever possible Maintain the credibility of the advising program
  17. 17. Justice Treat students equitably
  18. 18. Fidelity Support the institution’s educational philosophy and policies Maintain the credibility of the advising program Advocate for the student
  19. 19. Respect for persons Tell the truth (to students & others) Respect the confidentiality of communication with students Enhance the student’s ability to make autonomous decisions Advocate for the student
  20. 20. Maryce is in her fourth year at your institution, but is only a junior by credits as she has retaken several courses. She is seeking a Biology major with the goal of going to medical school. In reviewing her record, she has a 2.8 GPA but her GPA in pre-med courses is about a 2.2/4.0 and that is taking into account courses that she has retaken for improved grades. When you meet with Maryce you learn that she was referred to you by her faculty advisor in Biology to “explore possible alternatives to medicine.” However, Maryce has no interest in anything besides becoming a doctor, saying “I have worked too hard already and I have wanted to be a doctor since I was a child. I just have to find a way into med school.” She has not taken the MCAT (partially because she is retaking Organic Chemistry), but you see from her record that she has been very average in her performance on other standardized tests. Maryce’s plan to retake O-Chem, Calculus and Physics will delay her graduation and at this point she is unlikely to get into medical school. What do you tell Maryce as she seeks your approval for her plan? Do you frame this case in terms of ethics and does this case present a dilemma for you? If no, is there an added wrinkle that would make this a dilemma? What feelings do you experience when you are advising students who are pursuing courses of study that do not fit?
  21. 21. By the standards of the average student, you are a novice facebook user. However, you do keep an account and have found it to be a nice way to keep up with family and friends. You have been working with an advisee, Eldora, for four semesters. Eldora has struggled in school and has reached out to you for help throughout her struggles. You have mentored Eldora and feel a nice bond with her. You know that she will be studying abroad next semester and want to be able to keep in touch. You are also worried that she might struggle while abroad. You know that she does not respond well to email, but know that she is an avid facebooker. What ethical issues, if any, do you see in “friending” Eldora on Facebook? Would it make a difference if she was a graduating senior? Would it make a difference if she you knew that her facebook over-use was a partial cause of her academic difficulties? Would you accept her invitation if she friended you? If you friended her, would you have any ethical or legal duties?
  22. 22. Your Cases?
  23. 23. ReferencesBlanchard, K. & Peale, N.V. (1988). The Power of ethical management. New York: William Morrow & Co.Gordon, V.N., Habley, W.R., & Grites, T.J. (Eds.). (2008). Academic Advising: A Comprehensive handbook(2nd ed.). San Fransisco: Jossey-Bass.Lampkin, P.M., & Gibson, E.M. (1999). Mountains and passes: Traversing the landscape of student Affairs administration. Washington DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators.World English Dictionary. (n.d.). Retrieved April 26, 2011, from http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Ethics

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