Two College Students And A Team Of Snowboarders Become The Change Duane Bratsch, left, and Andrew Guddat, right, started N...
Bratsch and Guddat, who are both Western Nevada College students, started No Way! in 2010 because they were tired of how t...
Running a business takes money, and Bratsch and Guddat are dedicated to their business. They spend their money on the esse...
Because of the cost of running a business, Guddat has decided that he needs a more consistent income until No Way! takes o...
“ Having a job is great,” Guddat said. “All you have to do is show up on time and put in your full effort for a set amount...
According to an article on  Entrepreneur.com  there is a shift in the workforce and blazing your own trail may be the way ...
After a snowstorm hit Reno on February 17, I was invited to spend a night with the No Way! team. Guddat, out of the pictur...
I thought we were going to be going to a lot of places and getting a lot of shots, but I was wrong. I had no idea how much...
Before the riders can begin “hitting the rail” they have to build a jump, a runway to the jump and the landing. Photo by D...
Next, the riders wax their boards to ensure they do not stick to the rail or the snow. Odom, 22, finishes waxing his board...
It took Johnson, a University of Nevada student and professional snowboarder, about ten tries before he was able to nail t...
After Johnson, yellow pants, had hit the rail five times he notices that Odom, who owns Steezie Beanies, had not hit the r...
After five and a half hours, 7 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., the team packs up and heads to the second, and last, rail they would hi...
Upon arriving at the second location the No Way! team begins preparing the rail. Odom begins clearing snow off the stairs ...
Bratsch sets up the lights that are used to light the rail for video quality and the safety of the rider. Photo by Devin S...
Johnson uses a torch to melt any ice off the rail. If there is ice the rider has a higher probability of falling. Photo by...
It takes an hour of setting up before the rail is ready for Johnson. Photo by Devin Sizemore
“ Before I hit a rail, I am thinking about what trick I am going to be doing,” Johnson said. “ I think about the ATML, whi...
“ This rail is less difficult than the first, but has higher consequences,” Johnson said. Throughout the night, the though...
After three falls, one over the rail and two under, Johnson heads back up to try again. “ I put it out of my mind and focu...
An hour and a half, three falls, and a couple of clean runs later, Johnson finally lands the trick he had been trying for....
After eight and a half hours, 7 p.m. to 3:30 a.m., of shooting, the No Way! team was able to get two useable shots. All of...
“ The most rewarding part about No Way! is that I am doing something that I believe in,” Bratsch said. “I think the curren...
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College Students And A Team Of Snowboarders Become The Change

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This slideshow was put together for a journalism class I am taking at the University of Nevada, Reno. The slideshow features No Way! Snowboarding and looks into what college students are doing to make money and why. Produced by Devin Sizemore http://www.devinsizemore.com

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College Students And A Team Of Snowboarders Become The Change

  1. 1. Two College Students And A Team Of Snowboarders Become The Change Duane Bratsch, left, and Andrew Guddat, right, started NW! or No Way! Snowboards because they “were tired of buying products from companies that couldn't care less about us” quoted from their Manifesto on their website: http://www.nowaysnowboards.com Photos by Devin Sizemore by Devin Sizemore
  2. 2. Bratsch and Guddat, who are both Western Nevada College students, started No Way! in 2010 because they were tired of how they were being treated. “ We were somewhat disappointed with the quality of product in the industry, as well as how impersonal snowboarding companies were being to their customers” Guddat said. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  3. 3. Running a business takes money, and Bratsch and Guddat are dedicated to their business. They spend their money on the essentials, like the camera Bratsch is using, and continue to push for their goal to start selling to the public in the 2011/2012 season. “ No Way! is currently on a very tight budget, both me and Duane had some money in savings that we lumped together and have been using it as effectively and strategically as possible,” Guddat said. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  4. 4. Because of the cost of running a business, Guddat has decided that he needs a more consistent income until No Way! takes off. Guddat and Bratsch do not only have to pay for the production of their snowboards, but the lighting, cameras, generator and production of all promotional materials. “ I am actually looking for a second part time job to bring in some more consistent money while No Way! Is getting off the ground,” Guddat said. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  5. 5. “ Having a job is great,” Guddat said. “All you have to do is show up on time and put in your full effort for a set amount of time. For the most part, jobs are semi consistent and provide a sense of financial stability. On the downside you most likely aren't doing anything to make a positive change or working on something you strongly believe in.” Photo by Devin Sizemore Guddat explains the benefits and drawbacks of having a job versus owning a business.
  6. 6. According to an article on Entrepreneur.com there is a shift in the workforce and blazing your own trail may be the way to go for the younger generation. Although Guddat and Bratsch are college students they believe that owning a business is the right thing to do. “ Owning a business is also great,” Guddat said. “You get to call the shots and work on something you really care about. It’s a dream come true. Much more stressful but much more rewarding.” Photo by Devin Sizemore
  7. 7. After a snowstorm hit Reno on February 17, I was invited to spend a night with the No Way! team. Guddat, out of the picture setting up video, and Bratsch, sitting in the tree, were joined by two of their sponsored riders, Chris Johnson, yellow pants, and Joey Odom, red sweater. The goal of the night was to get as many good shots as possible. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  8. 8. I thought we were going to be going to a lot of places and getting a lot of shots, but I was wrong. I had no idea how much work goes into setting up for a shoot. “ Earlier in the day we scoped out both spots and figured out what security would be like and how much work we would have to put into building each spot,” Guddat said. “That night we dragged our generator and lights about 700 feet through a snowy field for the first spot and it took about five hours including set up and tear down.” Photo by Devin Sizemore
  9. 9. Before the riders can begin “hitting the rail” they have to build a jump, a runway to the jump and the landing. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  10. 10. Next, the riders wax their boards to ensure they do not stick to the rail or the snow. Odom, 22, finishes waxing his board before heading to the top of the rail. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  11. 11. It took Johnson, a University of Nevada student and professional snowboarder, about ten tries before he was able to nail the trick that he wanted. Riding is not just a hobby for Johnson, it is a large source of income. “ Sixty percent of my yearly income comes from instructing, coaching, riding and competing,” Johnson said. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  12. 12. After Johnson, yellow pants, had hit the rail five times he notices that Odom, who owns Steezie Beanies, had not hit the rail yet. Johnson tackles him to try and help him get pumped up. Joey’s last major injury was on a similar rail so he was having a hard time preparing mentally. “ I taco’d (was bent in half over) a down-flat-down rail in November and had to get two cat scans,” Odom said. “I couldn’t walk for several weeks.” Photo by Devin Sizemore
  13. 13. After five and a half hours, 7 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., the team packs up and heads to the second, and last, rail they would hit. On a side note I took a detour and got my car stuck. After a short tow we were on our way. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  14. 14. Upon arriving at the second location the No Way! team begins preparing the rail. Odom begins clearing snow off the stairs and adding snow to the landing and the jump. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  15. 15. Bratsch sets up the lights that are used to light the rail for video quality and the safety of the rider. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  16. 16. Johnson uses a torch to melt any ice off the rail. If there is ice the rider has a higher probability of falling. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  17. 17. It takes an hour of setting up before the rail is ready for Johnson. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  18. 18. “ Before I hit a rail, I am thinking about what trick I am going to be doing,” Johnson said. “ I think about the ATML, which is the approach, the take off, the maneuver, and the landing.” Before he straps in Johnson takes a second to look at the landing, which was about eight feet below the rail. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  19. 19. “ This rail is less difficult than the first, but has higher consequences,” Johnson said. Throughout the night, the thought of falling is always present. The second rail is especially dangerous, because if the rider falls on the inside they will have to slide under the cross rail or they are going to clotheslined. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  20. 20. After three falls, one over the rail and two under, Johnson heads back up to try again. “ I put it out of my mind and focus on what I will do differently,” Johnson said. “I either get really pissed or super motivated and sometimes both.” Photo by Devin Sizemore
  21. 21. An hour and a half, three falls, and a couple of clean runs later, Johnson finally lands the trick he had been trying for. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  22. 22. After eight and a half hours, 7 p.m. to 3:30 a.m., of shooting, the No Way! team was able to get two useable shots. All of the digging, setting up and falls led to two shots that will be used to promote No Way! in the coming months. Photo by Devin Sizemore
  23. 23. “ The most rewarding part about No Way! is that I am doing something that I believe in,” Bratsch said. “I think the current trend in business is all about ignoring the consumer and creating the cheapest products, and I don't like that. I want to see more companies in America that care about the consumer and the quality of product. It feels good to be part of a company that does that.” Photo by Devin Sizemore Slideshow by Devin Sizemore ( www.devinsizemore.com )

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