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Age of Learning Research | ABCmouse Improves Academic Performance for Pre-k and Kindergarten Students

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Age of Learning CEO Doug Dohring Shares ABCmouse Efficacy Research: This longitudinal study of ABCmouse Early Learning Academy reveals that when young students complete more ABCmouse learning activities, their academic performance improves. The findings highlight the value of ABCmouse as a supplemental teaching resource in both pre-k and kindergarten, when students are learning the foundational skills in literacy and math that are essential to long-term success in school.

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Age of Learning Research | ABCmouse Improves Academic Performance for Pre-k and Kindergarten Students

  1. 1. 1 ABCmouse Significantly Improves Student Outcomes in Pre-K and Kindergarten —DeAnna Owens, Ph.D.†, Leslie Ponciano, Ph.D.††, and KP Thai, Ph.D.†††
  2. 2. Abstract Proprietary and Confidential. • 2 studies examined the impact of ABCmouse.com Early Learning Academy on the acquisition of literacy and math skills • In Study 1 (2013-14), all participating pre-k students were identified as at risk for school failure. Students completing more ABCmouse learning activities evidenced greater academic gains than those who completed fewer activities. • Study 2 (2014-15) followed the pre-k sample into kindergarten with a quasi-experimental design, demonstrating that regular ABCmouse use helped accelerate kindergarten growth in literacy and math across multiple assessments. 2
  3. 3. Participants Proprietary and Confidential. STUDY 1 • Children from 12 public school district pre-k (DPK) classrooms in Tupelo, MS • 51% girls, 49% boys • Enrollment prioritized for children at risk of school failure based on pretest scores, English language learners, children with developmental disabilities/delays, and/or children living in poverty or homelessness. 3
  4. 4. Participants Proprietary and Confidential. STUDY 2 • 571 kindergarten students in Tupelo, MS • 210 were students from Study 1 • 361 did not attend public pre-k (non-DPK) • 33 classrooms from 4 elementary schools 4
  5. 5. Design & Procedure Proprietary and Confidential. STUDY 1 • Naturalistic Design: DPK students had varying usage of ABCmouse during the school year. • The school district tested students at the beginning and end of the school year with the nationally validated Early Prevention of School Failure (EPSF) assessment. 5
  6. 6. Design & Procedure Proprietary and Confidential. STUDY 2 • Quasi-experimental Design: district assigned 2 elementary schools full access to ABCmouse for the entire school year (Full-access Group). • The other 2 schools in the district received restricted access to ABCmouse, including no access to most ABCmouse literacy activities for the first half of the year, and full access to the entire ABCmouse curriculum for the second half (Restricted-access Group). • Students tested at the beginning, middle, and end of the school year with the Classworks4 and STAR5 assessments, and with the DIBELS6 at the end of the school year. 6
  7. 7. ABCmouse Usage Proprietary and Confidential. • Full-access Group not only had greater access to the full ABCmouse curriculum but also completed many more ABCmouse learning activities, especially literacy activities, than the Restricted-access Group. • When Restricted-access Group switched to the full ABCmouse curriculum in the 2nd half of the school year, the 2 groups completed similar numbers of learning activities. • “Regular usage” refers to access type and higher usage of the Full-access Group; “limited usage” refers to limited access and lower usage of Restricted access Group. 7
  8. 8. Results: Finding 1 Proprietary and Confidential. The more ABCmouse learning activities a student completed, the greater his or her kindergarten readiness score at the end of pre-k, indicating a reduction in the level of risk for school failure. • Students who completed at least 35 activities (median activities completed) during pre-k demonstrated an additional 65% gain on the EPSF assessment than those who completed fewer than 35 activities, and there was no statistically significant difference in the students’ pretest scores administered before the pre-k year ( see Figure 1). 8
  9. 9. Results: Figure 1 Proprietary and Confidential. 9
  10. 10. Results: Finding 2 Proprietary and Confidential. Regular ABCmouse usage in kindergarten predicted students’ learning gains in literacy and math skills. • While students in the Full-access Group started in Fall with slightly lower scores on the Classworks assessment than the Restricted-access Group, they demonstrated an additional 120% gain on early literacy skills from Fall to Winter, compared to students in the Restricted-access Group (see Figure 2). • Students in the Full-access Group also showed an additional 150% gain on early mathematics skills, compared to students in the Restricted-access Group ( see Figure 3). There was no group difference in Fall scores on early mathematics skills. 10
  11. 11. Results: Figure 2 Proprietary and Confidential. 11
  12. 12. Results: Figure 3 Proprietary and Confidential. 12
  13. 13. Results: Figure 4 Proprietary and Confidential. 13
  14. 14. Results: Figure 5 Proprietary and Confidential. 14
  15. 15. Results: Finding 3 Proprietary and Confidential. The number of ABCmouse learning activities completed over both school years was a strong predictor of literacy and math outcomes. ABCmouse use over both school years reliably predicted students’ literacy and and math performance at the end of kindergarten, after controlling for effects of age, DPK enrollment, and ABCmouse access type in kindergarten. The multiple linear regression model on literacy outcomes predicts that for each 100 additional ABCmouse learning activities completed over both school years, students would realize an increase of .03 points on the DIBELS composite score, 9 points on the STAR Literacy, and 3 points on the Classworks Reading (see Table 1). 15
  16. 16. Results: Table 1 Proprietary and Confidential. 16
  17. 17. Results: Table 2 Proprietary and Confidential. 17
  18. 18. Conclusion TM & © 2016 Age of Learning, Inc. All rights reserved. The names of other companies, products, and services are the property of their respective owners. We thank the Tupelo School District for their partnership in this study. Author names are in alphabetical order and are not based on level of This longitudinal study reveals that when young students complete more ABCmouse learning activities, their academic performance improves. • The use of ABCmouse within the DPK program reduced the risk of school failure by the end of the prekindergarten year. This finding held constant during kindergarten. • Access to the full ABCmouse curriculum independently contributed to the academic growth of non-DPK students. • The findings from these studies highlight the value of ABCmouse as a supplemental teaching resource in both prekindergarten and kindergarten, when students are learning the foundational skills in literacy and math that are essential to long-term success in school. 18
  19. 19. Further Reading TM & © 2017 Age of Learning, Inc. All rights reserved. The names of other companies, products, and services are the property of their respective owners. • Download the complete research brief (PDF) here: http://www.ageoflearning.com/case_studies/ABCmouse_Research_Bri ef_Significantly_Improves_Student_Outcomes_in_Pre- K_and_Kindergarten.pdf • The brief is also available from the Journal of Applied Research on Children at: http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/childrenatrisk/vol7/iss2/8/ • Visit the Age of Learning website for additional ABCmouse research: http://www.ageoflearning.com/research/ 19

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