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A Tale of Two Bikeways

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Bicycle and Pedestrian Improvements for Two New Brunswick Populations. Final group project for Dr. Pucher's Bike-Ped Seminar, Fall 2011, Rutgers Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. Authors: Jonathan Hawkins, Aimee Jefferson, Dorothy Le, David Nelson, Tiffany Pryce, Sofia Recalde

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A Tale of Two Bikeways

  1. 1. Bicycling’s New Image
  2. 2. The “unseen” population …where’s everybody else?
  3. 3. Bike Infrastructure Inequity - NYC
  4. 4. Bike Infrastructure Inequity - NYC
  5. 5. A Tale of Two BikewaysGOALCreate equitable bicycle and pedestriancorridors in New Brunswick to ensure allresidents have access and receive the benefitsof cycling infrastructure and resourcesdistributed by the city.
  6. 6. Study Area and Corridors
  7. 7. Considerations forNew Brunswick Residents Access to Access to jobs Low-moderate and transit campus income Language Bicycle barriers infrastructure needs Bicycling as a Basic bicycle positive status education Stigma of bicycling symbol/culture Rutgers Local New Brunswick Students Residents
  8. 8. New Brunswick Demographics Key Demographic Data for New Brunswick, 2010 CensusPopulation, 2010 55,181Black persons, percent, 2010 16.0%Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin, percent, 2010 49.9%Foreign-born residents, percent, 2010 35.5%Residents who speak other language than English, percent* 50.5% Non-native English speakers who speak English well, percent * 29.2% Non-native English speakers who speak Spanish or Creole* 87.0%Per capita income in past 12 months* $17,391Median household income* $45,645People of all ages in poverty, percent* 25.6%Owner-Occupied Households, percent 23.9% Source: US Census, 2010; *American Community Survey 2005-2009
  9. 9. Rutgers Student Body Characteristics of Rutgers Student Body Academic Year 2010 - 2011Total Enrollment 38,912Undergraduate 30351Graduate 8912Undergraduates who live on-campus, percent 44.2%White 16,915 (47.6%)Asian 7,929 (22.3%)Latino 3,525 (9.9%)Black 2,699 (7.6%)International 2,117 (6.0%)Other (includes multi-race/ethnicity and unknown) 1,608 (4.5%)American Indian 41 (0.1%) Source: Rutgers University Headcount Enrollment Fall 2010 & Common Data Set: 2010-11, http://oirap.rutgers.edu/;
  10. 10. Percent households earningless than $25,000 annually Source: 2005-2009 ACS
  11. 11. Percent Latino/Hispanic Source: 2010 Census
  12. 12. Percent Spanish speakers who reportedspeaking English “less than well” Source: 2005-2009 ACS
  13. 13. Percent Black/African American Source: 2010 Census
  14. 14. Percent individuals who walk to work Source: 2005-2009 ACS
  15. 15. Percent individuals who take publictransit to work Source: 2005-2009 ACS
  16. 16. Focusing on Rutgers Students…
  17. 17. Evaluation• Existing: – Groups: Outdoors Club, Rutgers Cycling Team, WBBB – Survey results – Master Plan: • "Of central importance is College Avenue itself" • More housing behind Student Center and College Avenue Gym• Long term: – Bicycle Friendly University status – Bicycle Master Plan – Ped/Bike advisory board Image credits: League of American Bicyclists (top 2)
  18. 18. The Master Plan Proposed campus bike College Avenue Campus network Image credit: Rutgers University Image credit: Rutgers University Master Plan Master Plan
  19. 19. Mode Choice Shift Current College Ave Potential College Ave Mode Choice Mode Choice Car 10% Car* 10% Bus Bus Bicycle 12% 23% 4% Walk Bicycle 28% Walk 50% 63% *No data collected for car shift• 51% of College Ave students would replace within-campus bus trips with bike-share trips• 55% of College Ave students would replace within-campus walk trips with bike-share trips*Source: Knight Biking Studio
  20. 20. Education • Short term: – Repair classes – Group rides • Long term: – Skills classes – Collaborate with enforcement – Create bicycle repair space • GSA has pump • Outdoor Club’s “The Image credits: WBBB (top), Stanford (left), Rutgers Cycling Club (bottom) Shed”
  21. 21. Encouragement• Short term: – Register bike and get free lights (Stanford) – Bike route map in welcome packet – Fun rides (Critical Mass)• Long term: – Commute Club: incentives for motorists (Stanford)…and bus riders? Image credit: movementbureau.blogs.com (top), SF Weekly (web) (bottom)
  22. 22. Campus Commuting (all campuses)NJ Transit or Bicycle Otherother non- Local shuttle 1% 0%Rutgers Bus 1% Service Walk 1% Train 10% Vanpool 3% 0% Droppoed off by someone not going to campus 1% Dont commute to Carpool or dropped campus off by someone 45% going to campus 1% Drive car 37% Overcrowded buses  Need for alternative transportation Image credit: Knight Riding studio*Source: 2010 Rutgers University Transportation Survey
  23. 23. Enforcement• Short term: – “Fix-It tickets” (Davis) – Target certain areas• Long term: – Bicycle citation diversion classes (Davis, Pima etc.) – Motorist education classes (Northwestern) – Vulnerable Roadway User law (Oregon)
  24. 24. EngineeringShort term Long term – Bike racks – Separate facilities • Prioritization list – Close off campus core • Make more secure (Davis) – Make bike racks more – Codify into Master Plan secure Image credit: VERTICES, LLC
  25. 25. College Avenue
  26. 26. College Avenue
  27. 27. College Avenue Perspective
  28. 28. Route 18 Trail Link
  29. 29. Huntington Street Split
  30. 30. Brower Plaza
  31. 31. Brower Plaza Perspective
  32. 32. R U Hungry Plaza
  33. 33. Chelsea Traynor Memorial Bridge
  34. 34. Focusing on local New Brunswick residents…
  35. 35. Pedestrians and Bicyclists as an Afterthought
  36. 36. Challenges of Bicycling in Low IncomeCommunities (LIC) - Biking is seen as a recreational activity - Concern for personal safety – Wide roads, cars drive at high speeds – Higher rates of crime – Quality of physical environment • Dimly lit streets • Lonely areas, vacant lots • Poor road/sidewalk conditions
  37. 37. Additional Challenges to LIC • Initial Costs – $100+ • “Where do we put them?” • Stigma that biking is for the poor
  38. 38. Potential Benefits to LIC • Minimal maintenance costs • Increased flexibility • Accessible to the non-licensed • Positive health impacts
  39. 39. Transportation to Work Mode Share0.700.600.500.400.30 Whites Blacks0.20 Latinos0.100.00 Car, truck, or van - Car, truck, or van - Public transportation Walked Taxicab, motorcycle, Worked at home drove alone carpooled (excluding taxicab) bicycle, or other means Source: 2005-2009 American Community Survey
  40. 40. Increasing City-Wide Cycling • Community Organizations • City Government • Rutgers University
  41. 41. Partnering with Local Organizations Unity Square Partnership
  42. 42. New Brunswick Government • Infrastructure improvements • Bicycle plan • More bike racks • Improved lighting, roads • Increase presence of law enforcement • Safe Routes to School
  43. 43. French and Suydam Corridor
  44. 44. French St and Joyce Kilmer Ave
  45. 45. French St and Joyce Kilmer Ave
  46. 46. French St Cross Section
  47. 47. French St and Bayard St
  48. 48. French St and Bayard St
  49. 49. Suydam St Cross Section
  50. 50. French St and Suydam St
  51. 51. French St and Suydam St
  52. 52. Suydam St and Commercial Ave
  53. 53. Suydam St and Commercial Ave
  54. 54. Town-Gown Relationships • Civic Engagement and Service Education Partnerships (CESEP) • Ralph W. Voorhees Center for Civic Engagement 55
  55. 55. Light Up New Brunswick A Bike Light Giveaway Program
  56. 56. New Brunswick RidesBicycle Ambassador Program• Ambassadors from different neighborhoods• Bicycle Safety Education• Promote “Share the Road” spirit• Appear at local events• Public outreach at schools, senior centers, cultural centers• Monthly rides
  57. 57. New Brunswick Bike Hub
  58. 58. The End Questions?

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