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Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) Solution-Focused Approach
Berg & Kelly (2000); Bloom (2006); Christensen, Todahl & Barrett (199...
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Solution Focused Therapy and Trauma Informed Care - Theoretical Similarities

Solution Focused Therapy and Trauma Informed Care - Theoretical Similarities

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Solution Focused Therapy and Trauma Informed Care - Theoretical Similarities

  1. 1. Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) Solution-Focused Approach Berg & Kelly (2000); Bloom (2006); Christensen, Todahl & Barrett (1999); DeJong & Berg (1998); de Shazer & Dolan (2007); Harris & Fallot (2001); Hodas (2006). Green, Krause & Muto (2010). Susan Green - sagreen@buffalo.edu Denise Krause - dkrause@buffalo.edu Jesslyn Muto - jh62@buffalo.edu Safety (emotional & physical) This is the number one priority in child welfare, as well as in TIC. This includes the respect and attentiveness to discomfort by all the personnel who interact with the family or child. When assessing for safety and creating a safety plan, a child welfare worker can use solution-focused methods like scaling and relationship questions to respectfully inquire about the family/child’s perception of safety and ways they feel safety can be improved. Trustworthiness To build trust requires the conveying of information in a clear, consistent manner. The worker will strive to respect the boundaries of informed consent in order to engage and build trust. In solution-focused work, the worker is a partner, not an expert, so the sharing and clarification of information about the child welfare process is inherent in the relationship. The use of a “not-knowing” attitude, coping questions, and exception finding are important components to building trust. Choice Families and children should have the opportunity to exercise choice over the services they receive. Part of having choice means the family/child must be informed of their rights as responsibilities throughout the process. The miracle question, relationship questions, an exception finding are all useful solution-focused ways of providing families/children with choice over their services in a way they can have ownership over and follow through on. Collaboration This means being “with” rather than doing “for” or “to.” Families/children will have a significant role in planning and evaluating services as well as in the process of goal setting and service priorities. In solution-focused work, the process is built on collaboration. The family/child is the “expert” on their problems and the child welfare worker is there is help facilitate realistic solutions. Coping and exception questions are useful in helping maintain the sense of partnership. This may require work in parallel process and scaling questions make tangible the evaluation of progress. Empowerment It is important to recognize the family’s’/child’s strengths and skills and building on those to create hope for the future Empowerment is a core philosophy of solution-focused work. Exception finding, compliments, miracle question, scaling, and choice encourage the family/child to find and own workable solutions to their problems without force or coercion. Shift of Perspective Away from the traditional problem-solving method, toward an approach that asks: “What has happened to this person” rather that “What is wrong with this person.” Solution-focused work is not a pathological approach to service provision, but rather one that focuses on strengths and resources of a family/child. Language The use of “everyday” language, as opposed to legal or clinical jargon facilitates a better connection and may encourage a shift toward more positive thinking. Solution-focused language is clear, helpful, and positive. The child welfare worker will speak with the language of solutions to foster hope.

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Solution Focused Therapy and Trauma Informed Care - Theoretical Similarities

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