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Role-playing and Emoting for Language Learning in Virtual worlds: Setting Scenarios and Writing Stories

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Emoting and Roleplaying
Emoting and Roleplaying
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Role-playing and Emoting for Language Learning in Virtual worlds: Setting Scenarios and Writing Stories

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A role-playing game (RPG) is a game in which players assume the roles of characters in a fictional setting. Players take responsibility for acting out these roles within a narrative, either through literal acting or through a process of structured decision-making or character development.

A role-playing game (RPG) is a game in which players assume the roles of characters in a fictional setting. Players take responsibility for acting out these roles within a narrative, either through literal acting or through a process of structured decision-making or character development.

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Role-playing and Emoting for Language Learning in Virtual worlds: Setting Scenarios and Writing Stories

  1. 1. ROLE-PLAYING AND EMOTING FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING IN VIRTUAL WORLDS: SETTING SCENARIOS AND WRITING STORIES. Evo Village 2016 Interactive Scenarios, Global Simulations and Role-Play games applied in Virtual Environments Dr. Doris Molero Webheads in Action Maracaibo, Venezuela
  2. 2. ROLE PLAYING GAME  A role-playing game (RPG) is a game in which players assume the roles of characters in a fictional setting. Players take responsibility for acting out these roles within a narrative, either through literal acting or through a process of structured decision-making or character development.
  3. 3. EMOTING  used for expressing oneself visually, as opposed to verbally.  done in 3rd person.  most often used to express feelings, gestures, and creating images.  Emoting uses an action-reaction- emotional response element.  Characters do something (or something is done to them), they react to it, and they feel something about that reaction.
  4. 4. HOW ROLE PLAYING AND EMOTING HELP STUDENTS LEARN AND PRACTICE ENGLISH  Students improve their use of vocabulary and expressions, writing skills as well as their critical thinking skills.  Low level students role play in a slower pace. One liner reactions. Higher level students can work on more thoughtful exchanges.  Students get time to think, write, read and consider what they want to communicate.  Back channeling allows student to get help when needed from the teacher or fellow role players.
  5. 5.  Students get the chance to use language in different contexts, with different characters and different scenarios.  It allows student to discover and experiment with new ways to express ideas, feelings and emotions.  Students learn from models and the counseling of more experience role players. HOW ROLE PLAYING AND EMOTING HELP STUDENTS LEARN AND PRACTICE ENGLISH
  6. 6. SAMPLE ACTIVITIES THAT CAN BE USED IN THE EFL CLASS THAT ROLE PLAYS.  Elements of Literature  Debates About Cultures  Keeping a Journals  Character Analysis  Participating in festivals or celebrations  Character Posters Design  Oral Presentations  Quizzes / Tests  Interviews  Machinima Making  Situational Role play  Participating on quests
  7. 7. Emote text : You usually use it when your character is doing something. It is similar to speaking in local chat except that you add "/me" in front. For example if your Second life display name is Gwen, typing "/me looks at Pionia" would appear as "Gwen looks at Pionia“ Simply using /me is enough to describe an action. /me
  8. 8. If you want to speak while making an emote, you would additionally need to use quotation marks. Example: Pionia is busy sharpening her blade when she hears the distinct sound of footsteps on the pavement behind the trash bin she was sitting next to. "Who the hell is there!?" She calls out as she rises quickly switch blade in hand. This one's a little more dynamic. All of the text will show up as an emote, but the quotation marks denote that John said something. “ Quotation Marks “
  9. 9. Sometimes you can also include what it is in your mind while you are emoting. You do so by using asterisks. Let’s look at the example: Ellie Stewart walks through the doors of the potions room, gathers all of her belongings placing them at her feet before pulling out her parchment and quills. Sighs *I’m not ready for classes to begin again!* Her head is still in the clouds from having such a wonderful summer. Her attention is drawn to the door when she hears it pushed open and she spots her best friend Emma walking into the classroom. "About time you got here!" She says quietly as she grins at her friend. *asterisks*
  10. 10. (OOC) Out of Character: Using brackets (( )) around your text let's other role-players know that it is you (the typist) and not your character who is speaking. Most role play SIMs limit OOC text in local chat. If you must direct OOC communication to a specific person, Do so in IMs. Use OOC in local chat only if you need to address everyone in the vicinity. For example ((Brb)). Please note that abbreviations such as Brb, l8r, cya which are okay for OOC chatter but they must never be used in role play. OOC brackets (( ))
  11. 11. God Mode is to effect another character's actions or story without specific permission. Respect the actions of the people around you, and don't assume you can act, speak or react for their characters. Look at the example: ::Grabs Meg by the hair and drags her outside:: this gives Meg no chance to react, dodge or fight back. She is made to go along with this action with no recourse. The way to do it would be: ::Makes a snatch at Meg's hair to try and pull her outside:: This gives her a way out or to smack your fingers with a wood spoon if she's quick enough. NO GOD MODING
  12. 12. Fast paced = quick response or the one liner” Bob throws the ball. Jane misses the ball and starts to cry. Bobs laughs at her. "Silly girl, don't cry. It’s just a game!" He gets ready to throw it again. This example is a basic form of emoting. It shows a dramatization, description of an action or reaction, dialog and a prompt. This is suitable for beginner role-players or lower level students. New role player or Low level students
  13. 13. Role player – High level student Slower paced = longer more thoughtful response. The elf jumps as she listens to her partner scream. Drops to the floor, hands over her head, her whole body shaking. *We’re gonna die!* Footsteps echo in the hall, coming closer. *This can’t be happening, not to me*. Tears burns her eyes, she wipes them away. Shakes her head and tells herself.. you have to see. You have to know. Calls her friend’s name…”Zuly…What’s happening? Is there someone out there? Are they here? Are we all going to die?" The second example uses reaction, description of the scene, dramatization, showing what you are actually thinking as well as dialog and prompts the other character to react to stimulus.
  14. 14. Getting started 1. Ask a question. This may be asking where you may find a room for the night or asking where the nearest bar is. 2. Observe and react. Find a group of people conversing between themselves . it's a good idea to just emote your way in and situate your character near them. At this point you can try and figure out what the current conversation is about and react accordingly. 3. Take proactive action. If you can initiate role play, people automatically want to role play with you. And initiating role play is easy if you set yourself upon a quest. People will come and help. 4. Be patient and go with the flow. Wait to read what others say . It takes a while. People usually think and write their reactions.
  15. 15. Let's look at the following example and discuss about it. What elements of role-play can you identify? How can this be used in a language class? Pionia Destiny looks out the window. The village street is black, and not even the sliver of moon cast enough light to see into the shadows. She sighs and keeps looking into the dark. Cyber Placebo gets a little nervous.. "Are they still out there?" Pionia Destiny scans the darkness with attentive eyes and ears listening to a faint groan. "Doesn't look like it, but I can hear something groaning.“ Cyber Placebo creeps up to the broken window and peers over Pionia's shoulder. "Maybe it's not a minion." "Maybe someone is hurt and needs our help.“ Pionia Destiny gasps looking at Cyber like she'd lost her mind. "You want to go out there?" Cyber Placebo folds her arms across her chest. "No," But I wouldn't want to leave someone out there either.“ Randall Sandler sighs and rubs his eyes. "Maybe I can get a better view from the second floor.“ Cyber Placebo gasps and tries to grab his arm. "But that means going outside. This door is locked!“ Randal Sandler ignores Pionia's funny look and pats Cyber's hand. "Yeah, it does." Activity 1: Looking at an example
  16. 16. Now, it’s your turn to role play a little scene. 1. Get in pairs. 2. Use private Instant message to role play your little scene with your partner. Try to use slow paced or fast paced emoting. Don’t forget to use the /me and a verb in third person. Include description of your feelings or actions in the scene, dialog, thinking and give your role play partner a hint to follow in the role play. 3. Copy your chat script on a card and send it to Pionia Destiny. Activity 2: Role playing a scene
  17. 17. Activity 3: Visiting a Role-play Sim 1. We are visiting a Role-play Sim in Second life. Avilion is a fantasy role play sim where you can be either a human, an elf, a dragon, a fairy, or an animal. Please, wear medieval fantasy clothing. You can also talk and act as your character. This is the landmark or the portal to cross worlds.. http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Avilion%20Nexus/128/135/7 7 2. Get ready to meet experienced role-players and have fun emoting and creating a story. You can take pictures and record the experience. Save the script of he role play. 3. Reflect on how can roleplaying and emoting enhance your students creative writing and critical thinking skills. Blog or post about this experience. Share your thoughts in our community.

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