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"You Have Standards?": Disciplinary Frameworks as a Bridge to Collaboration

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PA Forward Information Literacy Summit, July 24, 2013, State College, PA

Abstract: Collaboration between academic librarians and teaching faculty thrives when it is built on shared goals. The ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education outline the goals of information literacy instruction and provide librarians a framework within which to develop in students a disposition toward curiosity, inquiry, and learning how to learn. The disciplines whose faculty we aim to collaborate with also operate within frameworks that articulate what a student studying in that field should know and be able to do. This presentation will make a case for drawing on these disciplinary frameworks as a valuable resource for both understanding the goals our colleagues in other disciplines have for their students and becoming proficient in the vocabulary and language of the disciplines we seek to partner with in information literacy instruction.

The presenter will offer her own experience of building a successful collaboration with a writing professor colleague at her institution based on the areas of overlap and complement identified in the ACRL Standards framework and the framework utilized in the discipline of writing and composition, the WPA Outcomes Statement for First-Year Composition. Methods for both identifying and reading the frameworks of other disciplines will be modeled by the presenter. Participants will then put these methods into practice by working in groups to read a framework in a discipline other than LIS and make connections between it and the ACRL Standards framework. Participants will leave the session with multiple strategies for how to use these connections to facilitate and/or enhance collaboration with faculty.

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"You Have Standards?": Disciplinary Frameworks as a Bridge to Collaboration

  1. 1. “You Have Standards?” Disciplinary Frameworks as a Bridge to Collaboration Donna Witek, The University of Scranton PA Forward Information Literacy Summit Penn State University, July 24, 2013 donna.witek@scranton.edu
  2. 2. Image by Flickr user TschiAe via CC BY 2.0 ACRL Information Literacy Standards = learning framework for IL “The competencies presented here outline the process by which faculty, librarians and others pinpoint specific indicators that identify a student as information literate. Students also will find the competencies useful, because they provide students with a framework for gaining control over how they interact with information in their environment.” --Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education
  3. 3. Some considerations… •WHO am I collaborating with? •WHAT is their learning framework? •WHERE can I find it? •WHEN should I do this? •WHY does this matter? •HOW do I do it?
  4. 4. WHO am I collaborating with? • department • subject area • major • interdisciplinary?
  5. 5. WHAT is their learning framework? • tied to discipline… • …or tied to subject area/major • learning framework = goals for students studying this subject • what is the scope? “This statement describes the common knowledge, skills, and attitudes sought by first-year composition programs in American postsecondary education.” -- WPA Outcomes Statement for First- Year Composition
  6. 6. WHERE can I find it? • scholarly/ professional association for discipline • accrediting body • locally on your campus • subject-specific information literacy standards documents • look for outcomes re: research skills Council of Writing Program Administrators
  7. 7. WHEN should I do this? • prep for IL instruction you’ve done already • prep for reaching out to faculty/ department you’ve not taught IL to yet • to disclose or not to disclose? Chart by Dr. Teresa Grettano, The University of Scranton Faculty are trained in their disciplines at different times and may approach learning goals accordingly…
  8. 8. WHY does this matter? • shared goals = better collaboration • common vocabulary • collegiality • IL as discipline • a place to begin Information Literacy Program + First-Year Writing Program @
  9. 9. HOW do I do it? • start with the ACRL IL Standards • read learning framework for discipline you’re collaborating with • identify connections • begin a conversation! Mama Bullet 1: Understand a writing assignment as a series tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources (II.2) Considers the costs and benefits of acquiring the needed information (I.3) Selects the most appropriate investigative methods or information retrieval systems for accessing the needed information (II.1) Constructs and implements effectively-designed search strategies (II.2) Retrieves information online or in person using a variety of methods (II.3) Refines the search strategy if necessary (II.4) Extracts, records, and manages the information and its sources (II.5) Determines whether the initial query should be revised (III.7) Understand a writing assignment as a series tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources (II.2) Identifies a variety of types and formats of potential sources of information (I.2) Reevaluates the nature and extent of the information need (I.4) Refines the search strategy if necessary (II.4) Articulates and applies initial criteria for evaluating both the information and its sources (III.2) Compares new knowledge with prior knowledge to determine the value added, contradictions, or other unique characteristics of the information (III.4) Understand a writing assignment as a series tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources (II.2) Identifies a variety of types and formats of potential sources of information (I.2) Refines the search strategy if necessary (II.4) Extracts, records, and manages the information and its sources (II.5) Summarizes the main ideas to be extracted from the information gathered (III.1) Articulates and applies initial criteria for evaluating both the information and its sources (III.2) Compares new knowledge with prior knowledge to determine the value added, contradictions, or other unique characteristics of the information (III.4) Determines whether the new knowledge has an impact on the individual's value system and takes steps to reconcile differences (III.5) Understand a writing assignment as a series tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources (II.2) Synthesizes main ideas to construct new concepts (III.3) Compares new knowledge with prior knowledge to determine the value added, contradictions, or other unique characteristics of the information (III.4) Determines whether the new knowledge has an impact on the individual's value system and takes steps to reconcile differences (III.5) Applies new and prior knowledge to the planning and creation of a particular product or performance (IV. 1) Mapped connections between WPA Outcome II.2 and ACRL Standards
  10. 10. Disciplinary Frameworks • Information Literacy: “Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education” (Association of College and Research Libraries) • First-Year Writing: “WPA Outcomes Statement for First-Year Composition” (Council of Writing Program Administrators) • Sociology: “Sample Goals for Undergraduate Research Training”, p. 82 in Liberal Learning and the Sociology Major Updated (American Sociological Association) • Journalism: “The Core Principles of Media Literacy Education” (National Association for Media Literacy Education) • Education: “Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions” in Unit Standards in Effect 2008 (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) • Psychology: APA Guidelines for the Undergraduate Psychology Major (American Psychological Association)
  11. 11. Disciplinary Frameworks, cont. • Nursing: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice and Took Kit (American Association of Colleges of Nursing) • Engineering/Applied Sciences: “General Criterion 3: Student Outcomes”, accessible from Table of Contents of Criteria for Accrediting Applied Science Programs (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) • Business: National Standards for Business Education, 4th ed. (2013); price: $90 (National Business Education Association) • Humanities: Literature, Philosophy, History, Theology -- MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th ed., Chapter 1: “Research and Writing” (Modern Language Association) • Political Science and Literature have subject-specific IL documents approved by ACRL • Other subject-specific IL documents can be found at IL Standards Committee website

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