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Creating Collaborations Through
Connecting National Writing
Guidelines to the Framework for
Information Literacy: Framewor...
Agenda
Background: Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing (2011)
Connecting the Framework for Success to the Frame...
Framework for Success:
Background
Context of development
• response to Common Core Standards (K-12)
• “college readiness”
...
Framework for Success:
Structure
Introduction
8 Habits of Mind
5 Experiences with Writing, Reading, and Critical Analysis
...
Framework for Success:
Habits of Mind
#acrlframework
CC BY-NC
Habits of Mind Habits of Mind
Curiosity the desire to know m...
Framework for IL: Structure
Introduction
6 Frames
• Concept Name
• Description
• Knowledge Practices
• Dispositions
#acrlf...
Framework for IL: Frames
Authority Is Constructed and Contextual
Information Creation as Process
Information Has Value
Res...
Habits of Mind in the Frames
Frames Habits of Mind Frames Habits of Mind
Authority is Constructed
and Contextual
Openness
...
Frames in the Habits of Mind
#acrlframework
Habits of Mind Frames Habits of Mind Frames
Curiosity Scholarship as Conversat...
Other Intersections
Mapping exercises not included in today’s presentation:
◦ IL Frames in the Experiences with Writing, R...
Facilitating Collaboration
“Imagine that you enter a parlor. You come late. When you arrive, others
have long preceded you...
Facilitating Collaboration
First-Year Writing (FYW) Programmatic Outcomes align with IL Program
Outcomes
FYW committee par...
Facilitating Collaboration
Targeted collaboration leads to more intentional pedagogy
• Example: Remaking the FYW “one-shot...
References
Burke, Kenneth. The Philosophy of Literary Forms. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1941.
Costa, Arthur...
Contacts
Teresa Grettano
Email: teresa.grettano@scranton.edu
Twitter: @tgrett
Donna Witek
Email: donna.witek@scranton.edu
...
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Creating Collaborations Through Connecting National Writing Guidelines to the Framework for Information Literacy: Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing

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Presenters: Teresa Grettano and Donna Witek (co-panelists: Barbara D'Angelo and Barry Maid)
ACRL Framing the Framework Webcast Series, January 5, 2016

Abstract:
In 2000, the Council of Writing Program Administrators (CWPA) created the WPA Outcomes Statement for First-Year Composition (WPA OS), which was amended in 2008 and updated into its current form in 2014. In 2011, the CWPA teamed up with the National Council of Teachers of English and the National Writing Project to develop the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing. These two documents together articulate the behaviors, understandings, and habits of mind that college students should develop in order to thrive in both their college education and beyond. These documents also share considerable overlap with the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (Framework for IL).

This webcast will introduce the professional academic library community to the WPA OS and the Framework for Success with the goal of outlining how they align with the Framework for IL. Participants will learn the ways that information literacy is already embedded in the writing instruction context, making campus writing programs and instructors promising collaborators in using the Framework for IL to transform classroom praxis. The presenters will share ways the connections between these disciplinary learning frameworks can be leveraged as tools for meaning-making and shared pedagogy in order to build strong collaborations around information literacy with faculty across disciplines.

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Creating Collaborations Through Connecting National Writing Guidelines to the Framework for Information Literacy: Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing

  1. 1. Creating Collaborations Through Connecting National Writing Guidelines to the Framework for Information Literacy: Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing TERESA GRETTANO, PhD - @tgrett DONNA WITEK, MA, MLIS - @donnarosemary THE UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON ACRL Framing the Framework Webcast Series, January 5, 2016 #acrlframework CC BY-NC
  2. 2. Agenda Background: Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing (2011) Connecting the Framework for Success to the Framework for IL (2015) Framework for Success and Framework for IL as basis for collaboration #acrlframework CC BY-NC
  3. 3. Framework for Success: Background Context of development • response to Common Core Standards (K-12) • “college readiness” • scope: “This document...describes habits of mind and experiences with writing, reading, and critical analysis that serve as foundations for writing in college-level, credit-bearing courses” (2). Process of development (O’Neill, et al, 2012) • spring 2010: task force of 23 members, from 3 organizations: CWPA, NCTE, & NWP • 4 team leaders: 1 from each organization + the task force chair • iterative process: task force members respond to questionsteam leaders compose a drafttask force gives feedbackleaders of 3 organizations give feedbackmembers of the profession give feedback • January 2011: Framework for Success finalized Connection to WPA OS • Framework for Success intentionally modeled after WPA OS #acrlframework CC BY-NC
  4. 4. Framework for Success: Structure Introduction 8 Habits of Mind 5 Experiences with Writing, Reading, and Critical Analysis #acrlframework CC BY-NC
  5. 5. Framework for Success: Habits of Mind #acrlframework CC BY-NC Habits of Mind Habits of Mind Curiosity the desire to know more about the world Persistence the ability to sustain interest in and attention to short- and long-term projects Openness the willingness to consider new ways of being and thinking in the world Responsibility the ability to take ownership of one’s actions and understand the consequences of those actions for oneself and others Engagement a sense of investment and involvement in learning Flexibility the ability to adapt to situations, expectations, or demands Creativity the ability to use novel approaches for generating, investigating, and representing ideas Metacognition the ability to reflect on one’s own thinking as well as on the individual and cultural processes and systems used to structure knowledge
  6. 6. Framework for IL: Structure Introduction 6 Frames • Concept Name • Description • Knowledge Practices • Dispositions #acrlframework CC BY-NC
  7. 7. Framework for IL: Frames Authority Is Constructed and Contextual Information Creation as Process Information Has Value Research as Inquiry Scholarship as a Conversation Searching as Strategic Exploration #acrlframework CC BY-NC
  8. 8. Habits of Mind in the Frames Frames Habits of Mind Frames Habits of Mind Authority is Constructed and Contextual Openness Responsibility Research as Inquiry Curiosity Openness Creativity Persistence Information Creation as a Process Flexibility Persistence Scholarship as Conversation Creativity Curiosity Openness Flexibility Information Has Value Responsibility Searching as Strategic Exploration Persistence Creativity Flexibility Metacognition* #acrlframework *What about Engagement and Metacognition? CC BY-NC
  9. 9. Frames in the Habits of Mind #acrlframework Habits of Mind Frames Habits of Mind Frames Curiosity Scholarship as Conversation Research as Inquiry Authority is Const. & Context. Info Creation as a Process Information Has Value Persistence Searching as Strat. Exploration Research as Inquiry Info Creation as a Process Openness Research as Inquiry Authority is Const. & Context. Info Creation as a Process Scholarship as Conversation Searching as Strat. Exploration Responsibility Scholarship as Conversation Information Has Value Research as Inquiry Engagement Research as Inquiry Scholarship as Conversation Searching as Strat. Exploration Info Creation as a Process Flexibility Scholarship as Conversation Info Creation as a Process Searching as Strat. Exploration Creativity Research as Inquiry Authority is Const. & Context. Info Creation as a Process Scholarship as Conversation Searching as Strat. Exploration Metacognition Authority is Const. & Context. Info Creation as a Process Scholarship as Conversation Searching as Strat. Exploration CC BY-NC
  10. 10. Other Intersections Mapping exercises not included in today’s presentation: ◦ IL Frames in the Experiences with Writing, Reading, and Critical Analysis ◦ Findings very similar to the work in previous presentation that mapped the Framework for IL to the WPA OS ◦ Shared concepts across all sections of both documents ◦ Places where Introductions to both documents are doing the same work Where to find them: ◦ “The Frameworks, Comparative Analysis, and Sharing Responsibility for Learning and Assessment” (Grettano and Witek), forthcoming chapter in Rewiring Research & Writing: Frameworks for Information Literacy in a Digital Age (ed. Randall McClure, 2016, ACRL Press) Comparative / textual analyses as exercises in shared meaning-making ◦ You can do this too! ◦ And by so doing, you will situate the resulting maps and intersections within the needs of your own campus curricula. #acrlframework CC BY-NC
  11. 11. Facilitating Collaboration “Imagine that you enter a parlor. You come late. When you arrive, others have long preceded you, and they are engaged in a heated discussion, a discussion too heated for them to pause and tell you exactly what it is about. In fact, the discussion had already begun long before any of them got there, so that no one present is qualified to retrace for you all the steps that had gone before. You listen for a while, until you decide that you have caught the tenor of the argument; then you put in your oar. Someone answers; you answer him; another comes to your defense; another aligns himself against you, to either the embarrassment or gratification of your opponent, depending upon the quality of your ally's assistance. However, the discussion is interminable. The hour grows late, you must depart. And you do depart, with the discussion still vigorously in progress.” –Kenneth Burke, The Philosophy of Literary Form, 110-111 #acrlframework CC BY-NC
  12. 12. Facilitating Collaboration First-Year Writing (FYW) Programmatic Outcomes align with IL Program Outcomes FYW committee participation Assessment (FYW final papers) General Education / Eloquentia Perfecta Program #acrlframework CC BY-NC
  13. 13. Facilitating Collaboration Targeted collaboration leads to more intentional pedagogy • Example: Remaking the FYW “one-shot” • Research as Inquiry  Curiosity, Openness, Creativity, Persistence • Searching as Strategic Exploration  Persistence, Creativity, Flexibility • METACOGNITION #acrlframework CC BY-NC
  14. 14. References Burke, Kenneth. The Philosophy of Literary Forms. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1941. Costa, Arthur, L., and Bena Kallick. Habits of Mind: A Developmental Series. Alexandria, VA: Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2000. Fister, Barbara. “Burke's Parlor Tricks: Introducing Research as Conversation.” Library Babel Fish | Inside Higher Education. 2011, Nov. 11. Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Association of College and Research Libraries. 2015. Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing. Council of Writing Program Administrators, National Council of Teachers of English, and National Writing Project. 2011. Grettano, Teresa, and Donna Witek. “The Frameworks, Comparative Analysis, and Sharing Responsibility for Learning and Assessment.” Forthcoming in Rewiring Research & Writing: Frameworks for Information Literacy in a Digital Age. Ed. Randall McClure. ACRL Press, 2016. Mazziotti, Donna, and Teresa Grettano. “‘Hanging Together’: Collaboration Between Information Literacy and Writing Programs Based on the ACRL Standards and the WPA Outcomes.” [pdf] Declaration of Interdependence: The Proceedings of the ACRL 2011 Conference, March 30-April 2, 2011, Philadelphia, PA. Ed. Dawn M. Mueller. Association of College and Research Libraries, 2011. 180-90. O’Neill, Peggy, et al. “Symposium: On the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing.” College English 74.6 (2012): 520-533. WPA Outcomes Statement for First-Year Composition. Council of Writing Program Administrators. 2014, 2008, 2000. #acrlframework CC BY-NC
  15. 15. Contacts Teresa Grettano Email: teresa.grettano@scranton.edu Twitter: @tgrett Donna Witek Email: donna.witek@scranton.edu Twitter: @donnarosemary #acrlframework CC BY-NC

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