Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Banners tell the story - 301 Washington

76 views

Published on

The story of the Irwin-Sweeny-Miller family and their connections to 301 Washington Street

Published in: Art & Photos
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Banners tell the story - 301 Washington

  1. 1. The story of the Irwin-Sweeney-Miller family business & 301 Washington in Columbus, Indiana As told through the banners on display at 301 Washington...
  2. 2. CLICK THE ARROWS ICON TO VIEW FULL-SCREEN THEN, ON YOUR KEYBOARD, USE THE ARROW KEYS TO GO FORWARD/BACK
  3. 3. WHEN FINISHED... USE ESCAPE TO EXIT FULL-SCREEN MODE
  4. 4. Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), th Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, b manager of Cummins Engine Comp the transformation of Cummins fr company to a global leader in engin Company. The banking operations moved to another building, allowing Union Starch & Refining to move downstairs. J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society LET’S GO!
  5. 5. The story of the Irwin-Sweeney-Miller family business & 301 Washington in Columbus, Indiana As told through six banners on display at 301 Washington... A decade after establishing his bank in 1871, J.I. Irwin constructed a new building at 301 Washington emblazoned with “Irwin’s Bank 1881” on its cornice. The Daily Evening Republican described it as the city’s “handsomest and most imposing building for business purposes.” Eventually J.I. Irwin sold his interest in the dry goods store and began to invest in real estate and industry. To support these ventures, he built county roads, installed Columbus’ first telephone in 1878, and launched an interurban transit system with his son, William Glanton Irwin, in 1900. Joseph Ireland Irwin (1824–1910) began work as a clerk in a dry goods store in 1846. By 1850 he owned the store, and eight years later, with his business partner Francis P. Smith, he bought the building at 301 Washington Street. Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Joseph Ireland Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society At the turn of the century, they had a new family member join, Hugh Thomas Miller (1867–1947). In addition to being in the Indiana General Assembly and serving as the state’s lieutenant governor, Hugh Thomas Miller later would become president of the bank. In 1919, the Indianapolis architecture firm D.A. Bohlen and Son redesigned the interior of the bank and added elaborate metalwork at the entrance. William Glanton Irwin (1866–1943) worked closely with his father and oversaw the day-to-day operations of the family’s businesses. Not only did they build the interurban transit system, but they also started Union Starch & Refining Company which manufactured corn-based products.William Glanton Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Hugh Thomas Miller Bartholomew County Historical Society < NOT HIGH-RES. Through the family’s patronage and the Cummins Foundation Architecture Program, Columbus came to signify design excellence. In 1947, J. Irwin Miller was recalled from his naval service in the Pacific to become president of Cummins and Irwin-Union Trust. Together with his wife, Xenia Simons Miller (1917–2008), they would expand the Irwin-Sweeney- Miller family’s philanthropic efforts to include art, architecture, and design. J. Irwin Miller used his office at 301 Washington for his many business roles, and in 1958 he started Irwin Management Company as the family’s wealth management company. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Francis Galbraith, Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives J. Irwin Miller Xenia Simons Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Today, 301 Washington Street tells a story of architecture and design that spans a century. Architect Alexander Girard (1907– 1993) deftly brought modern design to this nineteenth-century structure. In the mid-1960s, Girard oversaw a facelift of Washington Street façades. He had two interior projects at 301, J. Irwin Miller’s office and the reception area in 1962 and the remainder of the offices in 1972. All three projects were featured on the covers of national design journals. Alexander Girard © 2017 Eames Office, LLC (eamesoffice.com) Photo courtesy of Hadley Fruits Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), the son of Hugh Thomas Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, began work as the general manager of Cummins Engine Company in 1934. He oversaw the transformation of Cummins from a small, unprofitable company to a global leader in engine manufacturing. In 1928, Irwin’s Bank and Union Trust merged to become Irwin-Union Trust Company. The banking operations moved to another building, allowing Union Starch & Refining to move downstairs. Also in 1919, W.G. Irwin backed a diesel engine venture initiated by his chauffeur, Clessie Lyle Cummins (1888–1968). The result of their partnership was Cummins Engine Company, known today as Cummins Inc. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins Clessie Lyle Cummins Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society William Glanton Irwin J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society THE IRWIN-SWEENEY-MILLER FAMILY 301The members of the Irwin- Sweeney-Miller family helped shape Columbus through their activities in business, religion, art, and philanthropy. This building, perhaps more than any other in Columbus, tells their story. & Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Nettie Sweeney Miller, Linnie Irwin Sweeney, Joseph Ireland Irwin, Joseph Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  6. 6. A decade after establishing his bank in 1871, J.I. Irwin constructed a new building at 301 Washington emblazoned with “Irwin’s Bank 1881” on its cornice. The Daily Evening Republican described it as the city’s “handsomest and most imposing building for business purposes.” Eventually J.I. Irwin sold his interest in the dry goods store and began to invest in real estate and industry. To support these ventures, he built county roads, installed Columbus’ first telephone in 1878, and launched an interurban transit system with his son, William Glanton Irwin, in 1900. Joseph Ireland Irwin (1824–1910) began work as a clerk in a dry goods store in 1846. By 1850 he owned the store, and eight years later, with his business partner Francis P. Smith, he bought the building at 301 Washington Street. Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Joseph Ireland Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society At the turn of the century, they had a new family member join, Hugh Thomas Miller (1867–1947). In addition to being in the Indiana General Assembly and serving as the state’s lieutenant governor, Hugh Thomas Miller later would become president of the bank. In 1919, the Indianapolis architecture firm D.A. Bohlen and Son redesigned the interior of the bank and added elaborate metalwork at the entrance. William Glanton Irwin (1866–1943) worked closely with his father and oversaw the day-to-day operations of the family’s businesses. Not only did they build the interurban transit system, but they also started Union Starch & Refining Company which manufactured corn-based products.William Glanton Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Hugh Thomas Miller Bartholomew County Historical Society THE IRWIN-SWEENEY-MILLER FAMILY 301The members of the Irwin- Sweeney-Miller family helped shape Columbus through their activities in business, religion, art, and philanthropy. This building, perhaps more than any other in Columbus, tells their story. & Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Nettie Sweeney Miller, Linnie Irwin Sweeney, Joseph Ireland Irwin, Joseph Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  7. 7. < NOT HIGH-RES. Through the family’s patronage and the Cummins Foundation Architecture Program, Columbus came to signify design excellence. In 1947, J. Irwin Miller was recalled from his naval service in the Pacific to become president of Cummins and Irwin-Union Trust. Together with his wife, Xenia Simons Miller (1917–2008), they would expand the Irwin-Sweeney- Miller family’s philanthropic efforts to include art, architecture, and design. J. Irwin Miller used his office at 301 Washington for his many business roles, and in 1958 he started Irwin Management Company as the family’s wealth management company. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Francis Galbraith, Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives J. Irwin Miller Xenia Simons Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Today, 301 Washington Street tells a story of architecture and design that spans a century. Architect Alexander Girard (1907– 1993) deftly brought modern design to this nineteenth-century structure. In the mid-1960s, Girard oversaw a facelift of Washington Street façades. He had two interior projects at 301, J. Irwin Miller’s office and the reception area in 1962 and the remainder of the offices in 1972. All three projects were featured on the covers of national design journals. Alexander Girard © 2017 Eames Office, LLC (eamesoffice.com) Photo courtesy of Hadley Fruits Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), the son of Hugh Thomas Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, began work as the general manager of Cummins Engine Company in 1934. He oversaw the transformation of Cummins from a small, unprofitable company to a global leader in engine manufacturing. In 1928, Irwin’s Bank and Union Trust merged to become Irwin-Union Trust Company. The banking operations moved to another building, allowing Union Starch & Refining to move downstairs. Also in 1919, W.G. Irwin backed a diesel engine venture initiated by his chauffeur, Clessie Lyle Cummins (1888–1968). The result of their partnership was Cummins Engine Company, known today as Cummins Inc. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins Clessie Lyle Cummins Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society William Glanton Irwin J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  8. 8. A decade after establishing his bank in 1871, J.I. Irwin constructed a new building at 301 Washington emblazoned with “Irwin’s Bank 1881” on its cornice. The Daily Evening Republican described it as the city’s “handsomest and most imposing building for business purposes.” Eventually J.I. Irwin sold his interest in the dry goods store and began to invest in real estate and industry. To support these ventures, he built county roads, installed Columbus’ first telephone in 1878, and launched an interurban transit system with his son, William Glanton Irwin, in 1900. Joseph Ireland Irwin (1824–1910) began work as a clerk in a dry goods store in 1846. By 1850 he owned the store, and eight years later, with his business partner Francis P. Smith, he bought the building at 301 Washington Street. Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Joseph Ireland Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society At the turn of the century, they had a new family member join, Hugh Thomas Miller (1867–1947). In addition to being in the Indiana General Assembly and serving as the state’s lieutenant governor, Hugh Thomas Miller later would become president of the bank. In 1919, the Indianapolis architecture firm D.A. Bohlen and Son redesigned the interior of the bank and added elaborate metalwork at the entrance. William Glanton Irwin (1866–1943) worked closely with his father and oversaw the day-to-day operations of the family’s businesses. Not only did they build the interurban transit system, but they also started Union Starch & Refining Company which manufactured corn-based products.William Glanton Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Hugh Thomas Miller Bartholomew County Historical Society THE IRWIN-SWEENEY-MILLER FAMILY 301The members of the Irwin- Sweeney-Miller family helped shape Columbus through their activities in business, religion, art, and philanthropy. This building, perhaps more than any other in Columbus, tells their story. & Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Nettie Sweeney Miller, Linnie Irwin Sweeney, Joseph Ireland Irwin, Joseph Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society LET’S TAKE A CLOSER LOOK THE EARLY YEARS <
  9. 9. Joseph Irwin Miller Linnie Irwin Sweeney Nettie Sweeney Miller Joseph Ireland Irwin
  10. 10. A decade after establishing his bank in 1871, J.I. Irwin constructed a new building at 301 Washington emblazoned with “Irwin’s Bank 1881” on its cornice. The Daily Evening Republican described it as the city’s “handsomest and most imposing building for business purposes.” Eventually J.I. Irwin sold his interest in the dry goods store and began to invest in real estate and industry. To support these ventures, he built county roads, installed Columbus’ first telephone in 1878, and launched an interurban transit system with his son, William Glanton Irwin, in 1900. Joseph Ireland Irwin (1824–1910) began work as a clerk in a dry goods store in 1846. By 1850 he owned the store, and eight years later, with his business partner Francis P. Smith, he bought the building at 301 Washington Street. Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Joseph Ireland Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society At the turn of the century, they had a new family member join, Hugh Thomas Miller (1867–1947). In addition to being in the Indiana General Assembly and serving as the state’s lieutenant governor, Hugh Thomas Miller later would become president of the bank. In 1919, the Indianapolis architecture firm D.A. Bohlen and Son redesigned the interior of the bank and added elaborate metalwork at the entrance. William Glanton Irwin (1866–1943) worked closely with his father and oversaw the day-to-day operations of the family’s businesses. Not only did they build the interurban transit system, but they also started Union Starch & Refining Company which manufactured corn-based products.William Glanton Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Hugh Thomas Miller Bartholomew County Historical Society THE IRWIN-SWEENEY-MILLER FAMILY 301The members of the Irwin- Sweeney-Miller family helped shape Columbus through their activities in business, religion, art, and philanthropy. This building, perhaps more than any other in Columbus, tells their story. & Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Nettie Sweeney Miller, Linnie Irwin Sweeney, Joseph Ireland Irwin, Joseph Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  11. 11. A decade after establishing his bank in 1871, J.I. Irwin constructed a new building at 301 Washington emblazoned with “Irwin’s Bank 1881” on its cornice. The Daily Evening Republican described it as the city’s “handsomest and most Joseph Ireland Irwin (1824–1910) began work as a clerk in a dry goods store in 1846. By 1850 he owned the store, and eight years later, with his business partner Francis P. Smith, he bought the building at 301 Washington Street. Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  12. 12. A decade after establishing his bank in 1871, J.I. Irwin constructed a new building at 301 Washington emblazoned with “Irwin’s Bank 1881” on its cornice. The Daily Evening Republican described it as the city’s “handsomest and most Joseph Ireland Irwin (1824–1910) began work as a clerk in a dry goods store in 1846. By 1850 he owned the store, and eight years later, with his business partner Francis P. Smith, he bought the building at 301 Washington Street. Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Joseph Ireland Irwin Joseph’s son, William Glanton Irwin
  13. 13. A decade after establishing his bank in 1871, J.I. Irwin constructed a new building at 301 Washington emblazoned with “Irwin’s Bank 1881” on its cornice. The Daily Evening Republican described it as the city’s “handsomest and most imposing building for business purposes.” Eventually J.I. Irwin sold his interest in the dry goods store and began to invest in real estate and industry. To support these ventures, he built county roads, installed Columbus’ first Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Joseph Ireland Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  14. 14. Eventually J.I. Irwin sold his interest in the dry goods store and began to invest in real estate and industry. To support these ventures, he built county roads, installed Columbus’ first telephone in 1878, and launched an interurban transit system with his son, William Glanton Irwin, in 1900. Bartholomew County Historical Society Joseph Ireland Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  15. 15. Eventually J.I. Irwin sold his interest in the dry goods store and began to invest in real estate and industry. To support these ventures, he built county roads, installed Columbus’ first telephone in 1878, and launched an interurban transit system with his son, William Glanton Irwin, in 1900. Bartholomew County Historical Society Joseph Ireland Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society 301 Washington
  16. 16. Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  17. 17. A decade after establishing his bank in 1871, J.I. Irwin constructed a new building at 301 Washington emblazoned with “Irwin’s Bank 1881” on its cornice. The Daily Evening Republican described it as the city’s “handsomest and most imposing building for business purposes.” Eventually J.I. Irwin sold his interest in the dry goods store and began to invest in real estate and industry. To support these ventures, he built county roads, installed Columbus’ first telephone in 1878, and launched an interurban transit system with his son, William Glanton Irwin, in 1900. Joseph Ireland Irwin (1824–1910) began work as a clerk in a dry goods store in 1846. By 1850 he owned the store, and eight years later, with his business partner Francis P. Smith, he bought the building at 301 Washington Street. Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Joseph Ireland Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society At the turn of the century, they had a new family member join, Hugh Thomas Miller (1867–1947). In addition to being in the Indiana General Assembly and serving as the state’s lieutenant governor, Hugh Thomas Miller later would become president of the bank. In 1919, the Indianapolis architecture firm D.A. Bohlen and Son redesigned the interior of the bank and added elaborate metalwork at the entrance. William Glanton Irwin (1866–1943) worked closely with his father and oversaw the day-to-day operations of the family’s businesses. Not only did they build the interurban transit system, but they also started Union Starch & Refining Company which manufactured corn-based products.William Glanton Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Hugh Thomas Miller Bartholomew County Historical Society THE IRWIN-SWEENEY-MILLER FAMILY 301The members of the Irwin- Sweeney-Miller family helped shape Columbus through their activities in business, religion, art, and philanthropy. This building, perhaps more than any other in Columbus, tells their story. & Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Nettie Sweeney Miller, Linnie Irwin Sweeney, Joseph Ireland Irwin, Joseph Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  18. 18. William Glanton Irwin (1866–1943) worked closely with his father and oversaw the day-to-day operations of the family’s businesses. Not only did they build the interurban transit system, but they also started Union Starch & Refining Company which manufactured corn-based products.William Glanton Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society
  19. 19. At the turn of the century, they had a new family member join, Hugh Thomas Miller (1867–1947). In addition to being in the Indiana General Assembly and serving as the state’s lieutenant governor, Hugh Thomas Miller later would become president of the bank. In 1919, the Indianapolis architecture firm D.A. Bohlen and Son redesigned the interior of the bank and added elaborate metalwork at the entrance. William Glanton Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives Hugh Thomas Miller Bartholomew County Historical Society
  20. 20. In 1919, the Indianapolis architecture firm D.A. Bohlen and Son redesigned the interior of the bank and added elaborate metalwork at the entrance. Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives Hugh Thomas Miller Bartholomew County Historical Society
  21. 21. Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  22. 22. Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), the son of Hugh Thomas Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, began work as the general manager of Cummins Engine Company in 1934. He oversaw the transformation of Cummins from a small, unprofitable company to a global leader in engine manufacturing. In 1928, Irwin’s Bank and Union Trust merged to become Irwin-Union Trust Company. The banking operations moved to another building, allowing Union Starch & Refining to move downstairs. Also in 1919, W.G. Irwin backed a diesel engine venture initiated by his chauffeur, Clessie Lyle Cummins (1888–1968). The result of their partnership was Cummins Engine Company, known today as Cummins Inc. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins Clessie Lyle Cummins Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society William Glanton Irwin J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society < NOT HIGH-RES. Through the family’s patronage and the Cummins Foundation Architecture Program, Columbus came to signify design excellence. In 1947, J. Irwin Miller was recalled from his naval service in the Pacific to become president of Cummins and Irwin-Union Trust. Together with his wife, Xenia Simons Miller (1917–2008), they would expand the Irwin-Sweeney- Miller family’s philanthropic efforts to include art, architecture, and design. J. Irwin Miller used his office at 301 Washington for his many business roles, and in 1958 he started Irwin Management Company as the family’s wealth management company. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Francis Galbraith, Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives J. Irwin Miller Xenia Simons Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Today, 301 Washington Street tells a story of architecture and design that spans a century. Architect Alexander Girard (1907– 1993) deftly brought modern design to this nineteenth-century structure. In the mid-1960s, Girard oversaw a facelift of Washington Street façades. He had two interior projects at 301, J. Irwin Miller’s office and the reception area in 1962 and the remainder of the offices in 1972. All three projects were featured on the covers of national design journals. Alexander Girard © 2017 Eames Office, LLC (eamesoffice.com) Photo courtesy of Hadley Fruits Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), the son of Hugh Thomas Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, began work as the general manager of Cummins Engine Company in 1934. He oversaw the transformation of Cummins from a small, unprofitable company to a global leader in engine manufacturing. In 1928, Irwin’s Bank and Union Trust merged to become Irwin-Union Trust Company. The banking operations moved to another building, allowing Union Starch & Refining to move downstairs. Also in 1919, W.G. Irwin backed a diesel engine venture initiated by his chauffeur, Clessie Lyle Cummins (1888–1968). The result of their partnership was Cummins Engine Company, known today as Cummins Inc. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins Clessie Lyle Cummins Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society William Glanton Irwin J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  23. 23. Also in 1919, W.G. Irwin backed a diesel engine venture initiated by his chauffeur, Clessie Lyle Cummins (1888–1968). The result of their partnership was Cummins Engine Company, known today as Cummins Inc. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins Clessie Lyle Cummins Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins
  24. 24. Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), the son of Hugh Thomas Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, began work as the general manager of Cummins Engine Company in 1934. He oversaw the transformation of Cummins from a small, unprofitable company to a global leader in engine manufacturing. In 1928, Irwin’s Bank and Union Trust merged to become Irwin-Union Trust Company. The banking operations moved to another building, allowing Union Starch & Refining to move downstairs. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress
  25. 25. Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), the son of Hugh Thomas Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, began work as the general manager of Cummins Engine Company in 1934. He oversaw the transformation of Cummins from a small, unprofitable company to a global leader in engine manufacturing. J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society William Glanton Irwin J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  26. 26. J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society William Glanton Irwin J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  27. 27. Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), the son of Hugh Thomas Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, began work as the general manager of Cummins Engine Company in 1934. He oversaw the transformation of Cummins from a small, unprofitable company to a global leader in engine manufacturing. In 1928, Irwin’s Bank and Union Trust merged to become Irwin-Union Trust Company. The banking operations moved to another building, allowing Union Starch & Refining to move downstairs. Also in 1919, W.G. Irwin backed a diesel engine venture initiated by his chauffeur, Clessie Lyle Cummins (1888–1968). The result of their partnership was Cummins Engine Company, known today as Cummins Inc. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins Clessie Lyle Cummins Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society William Glanton Irwin J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society < NOT HIGH-RES. Through the family’s patronage and the Cummins Foundation Architecture Program, Columbus came to signify design excellence. In 1947, J. Irwin Miller was recalled from his naval service in the Pacific to become president of Cummins and Irwin-Union Trust. Together with his wife, Xenia Simons Miller (1917–2008), they would expand the Irwin-Sweeney- Miller family’s philanthropic efforts to include art, architecture, and design. J. Irwin Miller used his office at 301 Washington for his many business roles, and in 1958 he started Irwin Management Company as the family’s wealth management company. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Francis Galbraith, Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives J. Irwin Miller Xenia Simons Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Today, 301 Washington Street tells a story of architecture and design that spans a century. Architect Alexander Girard (1907– 1993) deftly brought modern design to this nineteenth-century structure. In the mid-1960s, Girard oversaw a facelift of Washington Street façades. He had two interior projects at 301, J. Irwin Miller’s office and the reception area in 1962 and the remainder of the offices in 1972. All three projects were featured on the covers of national design journals. Alexander Girard © 2017 Eames Office, LLC (eamesoffice.com) Photo courtesy of Hadley Fruits Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), the son of Hugh Thomas Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, began work as the general manager of Cummins Engine Company in 1934. He oversaw the transformation of Cummins from a small, unprofitable company to a global leader in engine manufacturing. In 1928, Irwin’s Bank and Union Trust merged to become Irwin-Union Trust Company. The banking operations moved to another building, allowing Union Starch & Refining to move downstairs. Also in 1919, W.G. Irwin backed a diesel engine venture initiated by his chauffeur, Clessie Lyle Cummins (1888–1968). The result of their partnership was Cummins Engine Company, known today as Cummins Inc. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins Clessie Lyle Cummins Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society William Glanton Irwin J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  28. 28. Through the family’s patronage and the Cummins Foundation Architecture Program, Columbus came to signify design excellence. In 1947, J. Irwin Miller was recalled from his naval service in the Pacific to become president of Cummins and Irwin-Union Trust. Together with his wife, Xenia Simons Miller (1917–2008), they would expand the Irwin-Sweeney- Miller family’s philanthropic efforts to include art, architecture, and design. J. Irwin Miller Xenia Simons Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  29. 29. Through the family’s patronage and the Cummins Foundation Architecture Program, Columbus came to signify design excellence. and design. J. Irwin Miller used his office at 301 Washington for his many business roles, and in 1958 he started Irwin Management Company as the family’s wealth management company. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Francis Galbraith, Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  30. 30. < N y’s Courtesy of Lib al Archives
  31. 31. Work by “the Godfather of graphic design,” Paul Rand
  32. 32. Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), the son of Hugh Thomas Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, began work as the general manager of Cummins Engine Company in 1934. He oversaw the transformation of Cummins from a small, unprofitable company to a global leader in engine manufacturing. In 1928, Irwin’s Bank and Union Trust merged to become Irwin-Union Trust Company. The banking operations moved to another building, allowing Union Starch & Refining to move downstairs. Also in 1919, W.G. Irwin backed a diesel engine venture initiated by his chauffeur, Clessie Lyle Cummins (1888–1968). The result of their partnership was Cummins Engine Company, known today as Cummins Inc. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins Clessie Lyle Cummins Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society William Glanton Irwin J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society < NOT HIGH-RES. Through the family’s patronage and the Cummins Foundation Architecture Program, Columbus came to signify design excellence. In 1947, J. Irwin Miller was recalled from his naval service in the Pacific to become president of Cummins and Irwin-Union Trust. Together with his wife, Xenia Simons Miller (1917–2008), they would expand the Irwin-Sweeney- Miller family’s philanthropic efforts to include art, architecture, and design. J. Irwin Miller used his office at 301 Washington for his many business roles, and in 1958 he started Irwin Management Company as the family’s wealth management company. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Francis Galbraith, Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives J. Irwin Miller Xenia Simons Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Today, 301 Washington Street tells a story of architecture and design that spans a century. Architect Alexander Girard (1907– 1993) deftly brought modern design to this nineteenth-century structure. In the mid-1960s, Girard oversaw a facelift of Washington Street façades. He had two interior projects at 301, J. Irwin Miller’s office and the reception area in 1962 and the remainder of the offices in 1972. All three projects were featured on the covers of national design journals. Alexander Girard © 2017 Eames Office, LLC (eamesoffice.com) Photo courtesy of Hadley Fruits Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), the son of Hugh Thomas Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, began work as the general manager of Cummins Engine Company in 1934. He oversaw the transformation of Cummins from a small, unprofitable company to a global leader in engine manufacturing. In 1928, Irwin’s Bank and Union Trust merged to become Irwin-Union Trust Company. The banking operations moved to another building, allowing Union Starch & Refining to move downstairs. Also in 1919, W.G. Irwin backed a diesel engine venture initiated by his chauffeur, Clessie Lyle Cummins (1888–1968). The result of their partnership was Cummins Engine Company, known today as Cummins Inc. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins Clessie Lyle Cummins Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society William Glanton Irwin J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society
  33. 33. Today, 301 Washington Street tells a story of architecture and design that spans a century. Architect Alexander Girard (1907– 1993) deftly brought modern design to this nineteenth-century structure. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress
  34. 34. In the mid-1960s, Girard oversaw a facelift of Washington Street façades. He had two interior projects at 301, J. Irwin Miller’s office and the reception area in 1962 and the remainder of the offices in 1972. All three projects were featured on the covers of national design journals. Alexander Girard © 2017 Eames Office, LLC (eamesoffice.com) Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Three architecture magazines that featured 301 Washington on their covers
  35. 35. In the mid-1960s, Girard oversaw a facelift of Washington Street façades. He had two interior projects at 301, J. Irwin Miller’s office and the reception area in 1962 and the remainder of the offices in 1972. All three projects were featured on the covers of national design journals. Alexander Girard © 2017 Eames Office, LLC (eamesoffice.com) Photo courtesy of Hadley Fruits
  36. 36. Photo courtesy of Hadley Fruits Courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art
  37. 37. THE IRWIN-SWEENEY-MILLER FAMILY 301The members of the Irwin- Sweeney-Miller family helped shape Columbus through their activities in business, religion, art, and philanthropy. This building, perhaps more than any other in Columbus, tells their story. & Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Nettie Sweeney Miller, Linnie Irwin Sweeney, Joseph Ireland Irwin, Joseph Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society (photo) Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society (letter) Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society PHOTO CREDITS
  38. 38. A decade after establishing his bank in 1871, J.I. Irwin constructed a new building at 301 Washington emblazoned with “Irwin’s Bank 1881” on its cornice. The Daily Evening Republican described it as the city’s “handsomest and most imposing building for business purposes.” Eventually J.I. Irwin sold his interest in the dry goods store and began to invest in real estate and industry. To support these ventures, he built county roads, installed Columbus’ first telephone in 1878, and launched an interurban transit system with his son, William Glanton Irwin, in 1900. Joseph Ireland Irwin (1824–1910) began work as a clerk in a dry goods store in 1846. By 1850 he owned the store, and eight years later, with his business partner Francis P. Smith, he bought the building at 301 Washington Street. Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Joseph Ireland Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society (both images) Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society PHOTO CREDITS
  39. 39. At the turn of the century, they had a new family member join, Hugh Thomas Miller (1867–1947). In addition to being in the Indiana General Assembly and serving as the state’s lieutenant governor, Hugh Thomas Miller later would become president of the bank. In 1919, the Indianapolis architecture firm D.A. Bohlen and Son redesigned the interior of the bank and added elaborate metalwork at the entrance. William Glanton Irwin (1866–1943) worked closely with his father and oversaw the day-to-day operations of the family’s businesses. Not only did they build the interurban transit system, but they also started Union Starch & Refining Company which manufactured corn-based products.William Glanton Irwin Bartholomew County Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives Bartholomew County Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Hugh Thomas Miller Bartholomew County Historical Society Bartholomew County Historical Society (both images) Bartholomew County Historical Society (both images) Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society PHOTO CREDITS
  40. 40. Joseph Irwin Miller (1909–2004), the son of Hugh Thomas Miller and Nettie Sweeney Miller, began work as the general manager of Cummins Engine Company in 1934. He oversaw the transformation of Cummins from a small, unprofitable company to a global leader in engine manufacturing. In 1928, Irwin’s Bank and Union Trust merged to become Irwin-Union Trust Company. The banking operations moved to another building, allowing Union Starch & Refining to move downstairs. Also in 1919, W.G. Irwin backed a diesel engine venture initiated by his chauffeur, Clessie Lyle Cummins (1888–1968). The result of their partnership was Cummins Engine Company, known today as Cummins Inc. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins Clessie Lyle Cummins Photo courtesy of Lyle Cummins J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society William Glanton Irwin J. Irwin Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Photos courtesy of Lyle Cummins Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society (both) Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society PHOTO CREDITS
  41. 41. < NOT HIGH-RES. Through the family’s patronage and the Cummins Foundation Architecture Program, Columbus came to signify design excellence. In 1947, J. Irwin Miller was recalled from his naval service in the Pacific to become president of Cummins and Irwin-Union Trust. Together with his wife, Xenia Simons Miller (1917–2008), they would expand the Irwin-Sweeney- Miller family’s philanthropic efforts to include art, architecture, and design. J. Irwin Miller used his office at 301 Washington for his many business roles, and in 1958 he started Irwin Management Company as the family’s wealth management company. Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Francis Galbraith, Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives J. Irwin Miller Xenia Simons Miller Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress (photos 1 & 3) Francis Galbraith, Columbus Indiana Architectural Archives (photo 2) Don Nissen, Columbus Area Visitors Center (left) Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society Irwin-Sweeney-Miller Family Collection, Indiana Historical Society PHOTO CREDITS
  42. 42. Today, 301 Washington Street tells a story of architecture and design that spans a century. Architect Alexander Girard (1907– 1993) deftly brought modern design to this nineteenth-century structure. In the mid-1960s, Girard oversaw a facelift of Washington Street façades. He had two interior projects at 301, J. Irwin Miller’s office and the reception area in 1962 and the remainder of the offices in 1972. All three projects were featured on the covers of national design journals. Alexander Girard © 2017 Eames Office, LLC (eamesoffice.com) Photo courtesy of Hadley Fruits Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress Courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art Balthazar Korab, Courtesy of Library of Congress (left) Courtesy of Hadley Fruits (left) © 2017 Eames Office, LLC (eamesoffice.com) Courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art PHOTO CREDITS Don Nissen, Columbus Area Visitors Center (right)

×