Week 2 basic tourist reception & effective communication

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Week 2 basic tourist reception & effective communication

  1. 1. Basic Tourist Receptionand Effective Communication Week 2
  2. 2. Objectives•  Review of the Tourism Industry Structure•  Importance of Tourism•  Nature of basic tour guiding and reception•  Importance of first impression•  Effective Communication Skills
  3. 3. Tourists•  People who leave their homes to temporarily visit a place•  They should be spending and not earning money from the place they visit•  Reasons can be pleasure, meetings or seminars•  With the intention of learning something about the place like its history, people, culture and traditions
  4. 4. Types of Tourist•  Foreign Tourist – a non Filipino nationals visiting any of our tourist destinations or regions•  Local Tourist – a Filipino National visiting any places of our country and stays more than 24 hours. If less than a 24 hours we define as “excursionist”
  5. 5. Characteristics of Tourism•  Product is not brought to the consumer;•  The tourism product is not used up, it doesn’t exhaust the country’s natural resources;•  People-oriented;•  Labor-intensive;•  Multi-dimensional;•  Seasonal;•  Dynamic;•  Characterized by the changing ideas of its customers.
  6. 6. Nature of Tour Reception & Guiding•  First impression of tourists play a very important role•  Receiving tourists is just like receiving guests in your home•  Show the best without boasting or overdoing•  Guiding is not simply telling them “to your left, to your left”, there’s a lot more into it.
  7. 7. Tour Guide•  A tour guide is a person who leads groups of people around a town, museum, or other tourist venue.
  8. 8. Tour Guide•  The tour guide provides a commentary on the features and history of the location, the tours can be from as little as 10-15 minutes to extended periods over many days.
  9. 9. Tour Guide•  Considerable importance is placed on the guides knowledge of local stories, history and culture depending on the location of the tour.
  10. 10. Points to PonderOur attitude toward our visitors - whether they are from around the world, across the province or across the street - is a key element of service which forms a lasting memory of their visit.


  11. 11. 
 Points to PonderCourtesy, friendliness and professionalism are essential ingredients of successful tourism industry operations.We should be encouraged to take pride in ourselves, in what we do and in where we live.
  12. 12. 
 

 
 
 COMMUNICATION
  13. 13. THE COMMUNICATION PROCESS
•  Communication starts with an idea in the senders mind.•  The sender translates the idea into words and this becomes the message.•  The receiver translates the message back into an idea.•  When the receivers idea is the same as the senders idea, effective communication has taken place.


  14. 14. TIPS FOR IMPROVING COMMUNICATION
1. Ask questions to determine knowledge level.2. Listen to vocal clues.3. Watch for non-verbal clues.4. Use simple words.
  15. 15. TIPS FOR IMPROVING COMMUNICATION
5. Ask questions if you dont understand something, or feel you may have missed the point.6. Use pictures or diagrams whenever appropriate.7. Use gestures to assist you.
  16. 16. TIPS FOR IMPROVING COMMUNICATION
 Telephone Conversation SampleJay : So let me repeat it, maam. You will be an hour late. Mr. Klein can go ahead to the convention and youll just meet him there. Did I get it right?Mrs. Klein : Yes, Thats right. And please inform him that were sitting in front.Jay : I will, maam. Is there anything else?Mrs. Klein : Thats all. Thank you.Jay : Youre welcome.
  17. 17. Communication Skills•  Language proficiency•  Avoid using highfalutin words, use simple, easy to understand words•  Try to get rid of regional accent•  Use synonyms to explain, to describe something
  18. 18. Communication Skills•  Use non-verbal communication in a difficult thing or situation•  Speak audibly, not too soft and not too loud•  Conduct your commentary in a relaxed, entertaining manner (they came here to enjoy, remember)
  19. 19. COMMUNICATION GAME
  20. 20. Verbal Communication1.  Communicate clearly. - Clear communication: message sent = message received - Being a successful sender or receiver: NOT EASY - Necessary: repetition and feedback
  21. 21. Verbal Communication2. Communicate effectively. -Maintenance of customer’s self-esteem -Repetition and feedback -Use of easy and clear words -Listen and observe people’s verbals (words) and non-verbals (body language) -Focus on another person’s personality not his performance -Tone of voice: communicates as much, or more, of actual message as to words themselves -Use of body language
  22. 22. Verbal Communication3.
Say the right thing at the right time. -TO BE AVOIDED: language that can turn off customers -TO BE OBSERVED ALWAYS: tact in speaking and moving about
  23. 23. Verbal Communication4.
Communicate your best image. -ESSENTIAL: a good first impression -IMPORTANT: well-groomed personality with a positive attitude
  24. 24. Verbal Communication5.
Sell yourself through your body language. -High and steady head -Natural, unaffected arm movement -Relaxed facial muscles -Smiling face -Controlled body movement -Maintained eye contact
  25. 25. Verbal Communication6. Sell yourself through your tone of voice. -Knowing how to say something -Sophisticated and formal bur relaxed and warm manner of talking - Avoiding the following types of voicing: • Loud • Agitated/angry • Nervous • Fast – paced • Tired/ sickly/ weak • Upbeat/high on drugs • Authoritative/demanding • Meek/shy • Too serious/too scholarly
  26. 26. MAKING PEOPLEFEEL WELCOME  
  27. 27. Getting to Know You!•  First and last name•  Occupation•  clue to associateRemember : when we meet new people, one of the most effective ways of making them feel welcome and acknowledge is to use and remember their names.
  28. 28. Using and Remembering Names
•  Why do we like to use someone’s name? Or, why is it nice when someone remembers and uses our name?•  Why then don’t we remember and use names more often?
  29. 29. TIPS
FOR
USING
AND
 
 REMEMBERING
NAMES 
TECHNIQUES:1. Clear your mind so that you can listen to the name and hear it properly.2. Ask for the spelling and check the pronunciation.3. Repeat the name in conversation.4. Use the name when saying good-bye.5. Write the name down for future reference.
  30. 30. Additional points/tips for using and remembering Names1) Spelling




To
help
you
grasp
an
unfamiliar
name,
SPELL
 the
name.
 Example: Jon Tomson (no ‘h’ and no ‘p’)
  31. 31. 2) Clue or Association is a personal matter ASSOCIATE
the
name
with
something
 connected
to
the
person.
 Example: Tommy Lee Ling, an owner of canned meat company (malingco) who reminds you of the actor, Tommy Lee Jones.
  32. 32. 3.
Some
names
will
have
no
meaning
for
you
 and
form
no
pictures,
therefore,
you
may
have
 to
BREAK
the
name
apart.


 YOUR SUCCESS IN REMEMBERING NAMES DEPENDS UPON THE EFFORT YOU PUT INTO IT.
  33. 33. Making ConversationWho do you find it easy to converse with? •  Friends •  Family •  Co-workersWhy are conversation important to people? •  They help us feel comfortable •  feel recognize •  ease tension •  gather information
  34. 34. Knowing how to start a conversation is vital in the tourism industry.A conversation can help a visitor feel welcome and more comfortable in an unfamiliar environment.Also, it may help YOU, as a service professional, gain the information you need to make a sale, solve a problem, or serve the visitors needs.
  35. 35. SOME SUGGESTIONS FOR INITIATING A CONVERSATION
1.
Use
a
quesAon
or
statement
to
spark
interest.
2.
Ask
an
open
quesAon
about
something
 perAnent
to
the
surroundings
or
the
situaAon.
 Ask
quesAons
to
which
the
other
person
will
 know
the
answer.



  36. 36. 3.
Find
out
about
the
persons
work
or
interests.
4.
Find
out
if
the
person
is
not
from
your
area.
 NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE VALUE OF PERSONAL ATTENTION.
  37. 37. Using and remembering names and making conversation are veryimportant skills in the tourism industry.•  Must be used appropriately and with sincerity.•  Must be practiced in order for you to feel comfortable using them.•  Apart of the responsibility we carry for going more than half way to create the feeling of ‘hospitality’.•  Leave a dynamic impression on the visitor.
  38. 38. YOUR ATTITUDE IS KEY!
  39. 39. WHY DO FIRMS LOSE CUSTOMERS? 
Surveys of many kinds of businesses indicate that firms lose customers for various reasons.Choose which one you feel is the main reason why firms lose customers.
  40. 40. WHY DO FIRMS LOSE CUSTOMERS? % of customers die. 
 % of customers move away. % of customers float from one firm to another. % of customers change firms because the people giving service are indifferent and show little interest in them or their needs. % of customers change firms on recommendation of their friends. % of customers change firms because they believe they can buy more cheaply elsewhere. % of customers buy according to their whims.
  41. 41. There are four virtues of leading importance to people wishing to work successfully in the tourism industry. They are:•  COURTESY•  SINCERITY•  CONSISTENCY•  FRIENDLINESS
  42. 42. FIRST

IMPRESSIONS

  43. 43. Exercise





What are the factors of FIRST IMPRESSION?
  44. 44. ‘Positive First Impression’•  The Philippines is being known, the world over for it’s friendliness and hospitality•  You may be the first and lasting impression in a visitor’s memory.•  Research indicates that it takes up (1.5) one year and 5 months of continual contact to change a first impression
  45. 45. TIPS TO MAKE YOUR FIRST IMPRESSION A POSITIVE ONE
When you work in the service industry, youare constantly in the public eye. The visitor’sperception of you and your business isbased upon the impression you create.
  46. 46. TIPS TO MAKE YOUR FIRST IMPRESSION A POSITIVE ONE
 To the visitor, YOU are the business you work for, and perhaps the only contact the visitor may have with your community.


  47. 47. TIPS TO MAKE YOUR FIRST IMPRESSION A POSITIVE ONE


 From the first impressions made through personal and telephone contact, visitors will come to a conclusion about what kind of person is serving them, what they may expect in the way of service and whether or not you intend to pay attention to their needs.
  48. 48. TIPS TO MAKE YOUR FIRST IMPRESSION A POSITIVE ONE


1. Make sure that you are appropriately groomed everyday, and check your appearance frequently.2. Always greet guests as soon as they enter. If you are busy or on the telephone, give a smile and a nod to indicate that you know they are there.
  49. 49. TIPS TO MAKE YOUR FIRST IMPRESSION A POSITIVE ONE


3. Keep your work space, front entrance and public areas clean and tidy4. Carry yourself with pride and confidence.5. Never make assumptions. Greet ALL your guests courteously
  50. 50. TIPS TO MAKE YOUR FIRST IMPRESSION A POSITIVE ONE


4. Treat your co-workers politely.5. Smile, but smile sincerely.6. Be aware of your posture, poise and facial expressions.
  51. 51. IMPORTANT Things for Positive Impressions•  Personal Hygiene •  Body movements•  Facial expressions •  Friendly•  Clothing •  Sincere•  Posture •  Honest•  Body language •  Provide accurate•  Accessories and clear information
  52. 52. Points
to
Ponder 
It
is
very
important
not
to
make
assump:ons
 about
our
visitors
by
forming
first
 impressions
based
on
our
own
values,
biases
 and
past
experiences.

All
visitors
and
customers
should
be
treated
 with
courtesy
and
respect.



  53. 53. Cultural AwarenessToday, customers come from diverse backgrounds – backgrounds composed of many different languages and cultures.English is even spoken as a second or even third language.Communicating effectively with these customers requires skills and understanding of individual differences.
  54. 54. When talking with a customer from another culture who speaks English as a second language, it is important to stay with basic language to reduce the risk of poor communications. To help you accomplish this, follow these guidelines:
  55. 55. Guidelines1.  Avoid slang, acronyms, plays on words or expressions that are uniquely American. A few examples: “I’ll need your John Hancock on this.” “It’s a piece of cake.” “Don’t sweat it.” “Garbage in, garbage out.” “Let me run it up the flag pole for you.”
  56. 56. Guidelines2. Avoid jokes, because they may not be understood. In fact, unless you laugh hard at your own punch line, the customer of different (non- American influenced) cultures will probably not know it was a joke. Even then, there is still no guarantee.
  57. 57. Guidelines3. Be patient. Keep in mind the language conversion mentioned earlier – it takes time. Allow time for the customer to convert your English to her native language, convert it back to English and deliver a response.
  58. 58. Guidelines4. Be prepared to repeat yourself. Repeat what you said the first time exactly. Do not paraphrase. Why? More than likely the customer has missed only some of what you said or perhaps just a word or two, not at all of it. Paraphrasing may sound to the customer like something new being said.
  59. 59. Guidelines5. When the cust6omer is having difficulty understanding, speak more slowly. Often you hear people raise their voices as if speaking louder will make understanding easier. Speaking slower, not louder, will often solve the problem.
  60. 60. Guidelines6. Monitor for understanding. In fact-to-face situations observe the customer’s body language for obvious signs of discomfort. Note to what degree the customer is participating in the conversation. If you feel the customer has not understood everything, stop and politely offer to go over it again.
  61. 61. Guidelines7. Do not allow the customer to lose face just because he doesn’t understand everything you have said. Politely offer to repeat yourself by blaming the problem on some other factor. Here’s an example. “This paperwork can be so confusing. Let’s go over it again.” Or “The Company (your organization) didn’t make this easy for us to understand. Let me go over it again.”
 
The
idea
is
not
to
embarrass
or
blame
the
customer.

Keep
in
 mind
that
saving
face
is
very
important
in
many
cultures.

  62. 62. Guidelines8. Throughout the conversation, show sensitivity and understanding toward the customer. Remind yourself that you are talking with someone from another culture who speaks English as a second language. Follow his or her lead. For example, if he or she is serious and formal, match this behavior.

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