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how to
win friends
and influence
standards bodies
“Fuck these guys”
2004
<2004/>
“The W3C had so far failed to address
a need in the web community: there is
no language for web applications.”
W3C Workshop on Web Applications
and Compound Documents
implementers
+
interested community members
=
standards bodies
standards; how do they work?
solutions are hard
living standards
getting involved
lurk first
solution time is later
understand the constraints
build small coalitions
pick your battles
concede defeat; don’t retread
leave your sense of logic at the door
(objects in rear-view mirror are more
complicated than they appear)
prolyfill
be present
success stories
promises
web audio feedback via the TAG
adding the error to window.onerror
new es6 built-in methods
es6 module improvements
what’s next
streams
packaged apps
es7
#extendthewebforward
How to Win Friends and Influence Standards Bodies
How to Win Friends and Influence Standards Bodies
How to Win Friends and Influence Standards Bodies
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How to Win Friends and Influence Standards Bodies

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# How to Make Friends and Influence Standards Bodies

The greatest strength of the web is its openness. But not everyone appreciates how we arrived at the open web of today. A recent trend has cast standards bodies as bureaucracies that never accomplish anything of substance, while the heroic community innovates and implements “from scratch.”

Reality is much less black-and-white: sandboxes like Node.js have received much from the web platform and language that spawned them, and have a lot to contribute back. Standards bodies are composed of implementers and community members willing to engage, not ivory tower philosophers handing down bad, never-tested APIs from on high. And real gains could be made for both sides—with some effort.

This talk is part stories, and part lessons; it’s meant both to teach, and to open the floodgates for collaboration. You’ll hear about ways in which community input has had great impact on the standards process for the better, as in the case of web audio or adding promises to ES6. But you’ll also be taught communication and coalition-building skills that, from what I see, are sorely needed by many community members. How can you get involved and shape the future of the web and JavaScript platforms in a direction that will help everyone? Who are the key players and processes that they follow?

Finally, together we’ll brainstorm on and identify some key areas where your expertise and hard-learned lessons could help the web platform toward future solutions for problems it’s encountered.

Published in: Technology, Design
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How to Win Friends and Influence Standards Bodies

  1. 1. how to win friends and influence standards bodies
  2. 2. “Fuck these guys”
  3. 3. 2004
  4. 4. <2004/>
  5. 5. “The W3C had so far failed to address a need in the web community: there is no language for web applications.”
  6. 6. W3C Workshop on Web Applications and Compound Documents
  7. 7. implementers + interested community members = standards bodies
  8. 8. standards; how do they work?
  9. 9. solutions are hard
  10. 10. living standards
  11. 11. getting involved
  12. 12. lurk first
  13. 13. solution time is later
  14. 14. understand the constraints
  15. 15. build small coalitions
  16. 16. pick your battles
  17. 17. concede defeat; don’t retread
  18. 18. leave your sense of logic at the door (objects in rear-view mirror are more complicated than they appear)
  19. 19. prolyfill
  20. 20. be present
  21. 21. success stories
  22. 22. promises
  23. 23. web audio feedback via the TAG
  24. 24. adding the error to window.onerror
  25. 25. new es6 built-in methods
  26. 26. es6 module improvements
  27. 27. what’s next
  28. 28. streams
  29. 29. packaged apps
  30. 30. es7
  31. 31. #extendthewebforward

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