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Infographic: Web Designer vs. Web Developer

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Since more and more designers are familiarizing themselves with coding and more developers are paying attention to design, the line between the two professions is getting thinner by the day. However, although they might seem synonymous, the gap between the vocations is wide enough for people to differentiate between them. If you are still not sure how to do that, we are here to outline the core differences.

By mostly using their right brain hemisphere, creative and imaginative designers are focusing almost all of their attention on the visual representation of the website. Developers, on the other hand, are utilizing their logical way of thinking to create inner workings of a website by writing code and scripts.

Most designers will never go anywhere without their MacBook, as it allows them to Photoshop wherever and whenever the inspiration kicks in. On the other hand, web developers usually cannot imagine working with an unfamiliar keyboard, and for them, every day is “bring your keyboard to work” day.

The fact is that they both strive towards the same goal: creating a website or an app that will attract users, provide them with the highest level of satisfaction and ensure that the feel of the website matches its meaningful domain. They are both satisfied with temporal and locational flexibility, but are, consequently, dissatisfied with difficulties in achieving work/life balance.

Do they have any fears? Certainly. A designer commonly runs from Desktop PCs in order to avoid being tied to one place. Furthermore, they dread client revisions, as well as fixed-price billing – every designer will tell you they prefer the hourly billing option over any other. Web developers are afraid of server crashes and EPS files, but most importantly, bosses who don’t code. Experience has taught them that if a person has not written code themselves, they will not understand the complexity of the developer’s work.

To learn more about the basic traits that distinguish designers from developers and what the situation on the job market looks like for both, check out our infographic.

Published in: Business
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