Information Lit. Lesson w/Pathfinder: Dolly Morris Fa11, FRIT7136Pathfinder: http://hmstudiesliteraturegenres.wikispaces.c...
3.1.5 – Connect learning to community issues4.1.1 – Read, view, and listen for pleasure and personal growth4.1.2 – Read wi...
formats for recreation and information Recognize features of various genres and use different reading strategies for under...
GPS Unit Standard:  ELA8R1 – Student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence  of a warranted and responsible explana...
(character/problem/lesson) to include text-specific details as evidenceof each. By initially reviewing a sample of genre s...
 Can I connect the text-based details of my bookmark and book    review to genre characteristics with confidence and thus...
who proposes an information literacy need scenario to students.Through class discussion of SLMS-created PowerPoint during ...
LESSON REFLECTION:The benefit of working at a school as the SLMS, having previouslytaught in the school and held other sup...
the Book Review proved to be a great scaffolding component in thelesson. Those students proficient in Microsoft Office com...
Harlem Middle School          Coach Dolly and Mrs. L          Print and answer these self-questions and turn-in with your ...
Harlem Middle School           Coach Dolly and Mrs. L           Use this checklist to measure the quality of your Book Rev...
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Morris d information literacy pathfinder lesson plan

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Morris d information literacy pathfinder lesson plan

  1. 1. Information Lit. Lesson w/Pathfinder: Dolly Morris Fa11, FRIT7136Pathfinder: http://hmstudiesliteraturegenres.wikispaces.com/GRADE: 8th TEACHER(S): Mrs. Morris & Mrs. LCONTENT TOPIC: Literature Genres(Part of the larger unit: Elements of Literature, Short Stories, andInformal Response(s) to Literature)CONNECTION TO ALA STANDARDS:Standards for the 21st Century Learner Goals:Standard(s):Standard 1: Inquire, Think Critically, and Gain KnowledgeStandard 2: Draw Conclusions, Make Informed Decisions, ApplyKnowledge to New Situations, Create New KnowledgeStandard 3: Share Knowledge, Participate Ethically, ParticipateProductively (for cause)Standard 4: Pursue Personal and Aesthetic (appreciation of beauty)GrowthSkills Indicator(s):1.1.1 – Follow an inquiry-based process in seeking knowledge incurricular subjects, and make the real-world connection for using thisprocess in own life.1.1.2 – Use prior and background knowledge as context for newlearning1.1.3 – Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the searchfor new understanding1.1.8 – Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessinginformation and pursuing inquiry2.1.1 – Continue an inquiry-based research process by applyingcritical-thinking skills (analysis, synthesis, evaluation, organization) toinformation and knowledge in order to construct new understandings,draw conclusions, and create new knowledge.2.1.3 – Use strategies to draw conclusions from information and applyknowledge to curricular areas, real-world situations, and furtherinvestigations.2.1.6 – Use the writing process, media and visual literacy, andtechnology skills to create products that express new understandings.3.1.2 – Participate and collaborate as members of a social &intellectual network of learners3.1.4 – Use technology and other information tools to organize anddisplay knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view,use, and assess
  2. 2. 3.1.5 – Connect learning to community issues4.1.1 – Read, view, and listen for pleasure and personal growth4.1.2 – Read widely and fluently to make connections with self, theworld, and previous reading4.1.3 – Respond to literature and creative expressions of ideas invarious formats and genres4.1.4 – Seek information for personal learning in a variety of formatsand genres4.1.6 – Organize personal knowledge in a way that can be called uponeasily4.1.7 – Use social networks and information tools to gather and shareinformation4.1.8 – Use creative and artistic formats to express personal learningBenchmark(s):Standard 1: Use a critical-thinking process that involves asking questions, investigating the answers, and developing new understandings for personal or academic independent-learning activities Analyze what is already known, or what is observed or experienced to predict answers to inquiry questions Use technology resources such as online encyclopedias, online databases and Web subject directories, to locate information Select and use grade-level appropriate electronic reference materials and teacher-selected websites to answer questionsStandard 2: Interpret information and ideas by defining, classifying, and inferring from information in text Draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information Follow steps of a writing/creation process Create products that incorporate writing, visuals, and of the forms of media to convey message and main points Cite all sources using correct bibliographic formatStandard 3: Practice responsible and ethical use of information resources, both in their own library and in other institutions Share reading experiences and favorite literature to build a relationship with others Use a variety of media and formats to create and edit products that communicate syntheses of information and ideas Base opinions on information from multiple sources of authority Use real-world examples to establish authenticityStandard 4: Read, listen to, and view an increasingly wide range of genres and
  3. 3. formats for recreation and information Recognize features of various genres and use different reading strategies for understanding Read books from various genres Respond to images and feelings evoked by a literary or artistic works Use illustrations, context, graphics, and layout to extract meaning from different formats Describe the characteristics of different genres Select resources for classroom learning and for personal exploration Develop visual pictures of the main ideas and design concept maps, webs, or graphics to capture the ideas Apply technology productivity tools to meet personal needs Use multimedia-authoring tools for independent and collaborative publishing activities Experiment with various types of multimedia applications for artistic and personal expressionDispositions Indicator(s):2.2.4 – Demonstrate personal productivity by completing products toexpress learning1.2.1 – Display initiative and engagement by posing questions andinvestigating answers beyond the collection of superficial facts3.2.1 – Demonstrate leadership and confidence by presenting ideas toothers in both formal and informal situationsResponsibilities Indicator(s):1.3.5 – Use information technology responsibly2.3.1 – Connect understanding to the real world3.3.5 – Contribute to the exchange of ideas within and beyond thelearning communitySelf-Assessment Strategies Indicator(s):1.4.4 – Seek appropriate help when it is needed3.4.2 – Assess the quality and effectiveness of the learning product2.4.2 – Reflect on systematic process and assess for completion ofinvestigation4.4.5 – Develop personal criteria for gauging how effectively own ideasare expressed1.4.1 – Monitor own information seeking processes for effectivenessand progress, and adapt as necessary1.4.3 – Monitor gathered information and assess for gaps orweaknessesCONNECTION TO LOCAL OR STATE STANDARDS:(List here relevant content, information literacy, and technologystandards)
  4. 4. GPS Unit Standard: ELA8R1 – Student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts.Common Core Grade 6-8 Reading Standards for Literature: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics.Common Core Grade 6-8 Technology Standards: Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain- specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6-8 texts and topics.NCTE/IRA National Standards for the English Language Arts:(National Council for Teachers of English & Internat’l. Reading Assoc.) Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works. Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.OVERVIEW:The 8th grade students of Mrs. L’s class are beginning to studyexpository writing tied to nonfiction text research. To assist them inchoosing appropriate sources designed to provide the information thatthey need for their writing projects, it is necessary to providebackground knowledge about differences in print sources byconducting a parallel reading study on literature genres. The class hasjust finished reading Edgar Allen Poe’s “Tell-tale Heart”.Mrs. L has asked me to introduce students to the various literaturegenres with their characteristics and allow students to explore thegenres offered in our school library as well as suggestions for titlespossibly available in other locations collections (genre book list).Further, students should produce a product that reveals theirunderstanding of genre types, characteristics, and elements of plot
  5. 5. (character/problem/lesson) to include text-specific details as evidenceof each. By initially reviewing a sample of genre study passages incooperative groups in the SLMC, the group completion of a “Tell-taleHeart” guided practice bookmark, and the selection and reading, overa 3-week time period, of a book from the SLMC online cataloguefantasy, historical fiction, mystery, realistic fiction, or science fictioncollection, the students will ultimately create an independentbookmark and book review on what they have personally chosen toread utilizing a SLMS-created wiki with directions and resources.FINAL PRODUCT:Genre-specific Bookmark & Book Review with text-based evidence ofcharacteristics.LIBRARY LESSON(S):As part of cooperative learning groups, the students will access anSLMS-created PowerPoint along with a genre bookmark graphicorganizer, genre characteristics handout, and SLMS-pulled resourceexample passages to identify characteristics of literature genres, theavailability of those genres in our school’s library, and how thosecharacteristics apply to real-world information needs faced in real-lifeproject completion or problem-solving situations.ASSESSMENT:␣ Product SLMS and teacher assess “Ticket Out the Door” Guided Practice “Tell-tale Heart” bookmark SLMS and teacher assess individual Bookmarks for correct text- based evidence to support genre and elements of plot (character/problem/lesson). Individual Book Reviews visual representation assessed with checklist by SLMS and teacher. Classroom teacher assesses journal reflections on lesson topic and activities feedback. Pair-share peer assessments of Student Self-reflection Questions prior to project submission.␣ Process SLMS and teacher observe students’ social learning interaction in groups, guided practice participation with graphic organizer, and completion of individual bookmark and book review via SLMS- created wiki instructions and resources.␣ Student self-questioning  Does my bookmark and book review provide text-based details to support the particular characteristics of the genre that I read?
  6. 6.  Can I connect the text-based details of my bookmark and book review to genre characteristics with confidence and thus, synthesize the conclusion that I present efficiently?  Does my visual representation of the Book Review meet the checklist criteria?  Did I ask for help when I needed it?  Did I include proper citations for borrowed intellectual property referenced in my Book Review visual?  Have I completed all of the referenced activities in the wiki (bookmark, book review, self-questions, journal reflection) prior to final submission?  Does my work include my name?  Does my work include grammatically correct conventions?INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN:Resources Students Use:X Online subscription database(s) Galileo: EbscohostX Web sites http://hmstudiesliteraturegenres.wikispaces.com/Books:X Reference http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=genre http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/genre http://www.answers.com/topic/genre Galileo: Kids Search/Ebscohost Galileo: Middle Search Plus/Ebscohost␣ Periodicals/newspapers␣ Other (list)Nonprint:X YouTube Video - http://youtu.be/vDhUmn4IZ78INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES:o Direct instruction:The concept of genres is introduced via SLMS-created “Voki” avatar
  7. 7. who proposes an information literacy need scenario to students.Through class discussion of SLMS-created PowerPoint during whichstudents review the main characteristics of various literature genres, adistinction is made between “topic” relative to nonfiction texts and“plot elements” relative to fiction text categories. A genrecharacteristics handout is provided to supplement PowerPoint.Students are divided into groups as Mrs. Morris & Mrs. L take turnsreading sample passages from SLMC aloud. Groups appropriate genreof read aloud passages via student-led discussion utilizing the “tic tactoe” categorical table present on a slide in the PowerPointpresentation. Teacher(s) as moderator(s).o Modeling and guided practice:Next, students are assigned a mystery genre selection (“Tell-taleHeart” passage) to explore in groups, and they use printable bookmarkhandouts to record text-based evidence to prove that the passage fitsthe assigned genre. A roundtable discussion is held among groupsoffering text-based evidence examples aloud as Mrs. Morris and Mrs. Laffirm or refute via questioning with supported details highlighted.o Independent practice:Immediate: Avatar information need scenario is replayed. Students offer solutionsto avatar’s need via “ticket out the door” turn-ins upon check-out offollow-up read from one of the following genres offered via SLMS-created Book List assembled for lesson from online school catalogueprogram: fantasy, historical fiction, mystery, realistic fiction, orscience fiction.Three Weeks Later:Students complete a follow-up bookmark and a book review uponcompletion of the book and using the SLMS-created wiki withinstructions, resources, and assessment checklist.o Sharing and reflecting:In Mrs. L’s classroom, students share oral summaries of the booksthey read with their classmates assisted by created bookmarks and/orbook review products. Students share Web 2.0 Book Review visuals infollow-up SLMC session with Mrs. L and class & SLMS posts somereviews to SLMC website. SLMS & SLM clerk add Book Reviews toonline catalogue for school stakeholder review at checkout in SLMC.Follow-up reader’s response classroom journal topic: What I liked anddidn’t like about literature genres activities.
  8. 8. LESSON REFLECTION:The benefit of working at a school as the SLMS, having previouslytaught in the school and held other support positions as well, is theestablished relationships with adult stakeholders. I have known Mrs. Lfor many years – nearly the length of both of our careers – socollaborating with her on this topic of study was a blast! Not only didwe both enjoy it, but I felt as though I was truly helping remove apiece of the instructional burden from her shoulders based on ourschool’s improvement goals and data that warrants the need forincreased scores on the 8th Grade Georgia Writing Assessment. Often,the connected reading element of the writing process can beoverlooked or short-changed in the classroom because of timeconstraints, especially with so many standards for the ELA teacher toget through each school year. However, this lesson was designed toadd emphasis to the delineated differences between fiction andnonfiction print resources. Since most of students’ formal educationallives from this point forward will be spent analyzing fact-basednonfiction text, it is very important at this stage of their cognitivedevelopment to provide solid reinforcement of as many“non” examplesand sources of information as examples. The overarching questionsbeing, “Why do I need this information?” and “What kind of text willprovide the information that I need?”From the moment the Voki avatar was on the screen, the studentswere HOOKED into the initial SLMC location lesson. Even though theavatar was not an assessment part of the lesson, many students wereanxious to return home and have a go at creating one. That’s why theVoki website is listed in my PowerPoint. Plus, Voki is not an accessibleWeb 2.0 tool at our school.Since this lesson was designed with two parts – immediate skill-building re: characteristics of literature genres and a time-delayedfocus (3 weeks) that included personal student use of technology withaccess to and help from the wiki, Web 2.0 tools utilizations, andcitation inclusions, it is important to note that at this second juncture,there were “accessibility” issues at my school. Firewalls prevent accessto many Web 2.0 tools, so we had to “adjust” and be flexible, oftensending students in “shifts” to the SLMC to work instead of Mrs. Ltaking the class as a whole to the computer lab. This meant thecompletion of the products took a couple of days longer than wasoriginally planned. This was especially true for those who wereimplicitly determined to use Web 2.0 instead of Word of Publisher.However, the choice of how to produce their visual representation of
  9. 9. the Book Review proved to be a great scaffolding component in thelesson. Those students proficient in Microsoft Office components wereable to attain product completion using familiar technology tools,thereby compensating for other kinds of struggles to understandexplicit or inferred aspects of literary genres. And those studentswilling to take a risk with unfamiliar Web 2.0 were free to “stretch” inthat personalized learning approach. In the end, it all worked out,because I, as the creator of the wiki, could be right there totroubleshoot problems, redirect to other “friendly” apps that couldresult in similar product outcomes, and answer questions with studentsworking in the SLMC and directly within my purview for the secondpart of the lesson upon completion of the genre selection read.Needless to say, I learned a lot about what is “blocked” and what isnot at our school! Experience truly makes a great teacher.Our school hasn’t done much with student self-assessment and I didnot use it much in the classroom as a classroom teacher. That was themost difficult part of the lesson – getting the kids to think about thosequestions prior to submission of the product, despite the seeminglysimplistic “yes” or “no” answers offered. At that point, they justwanted to be finished. Of course, this was nothing new; editingourselves is usually about the last thing we want to do and we willavoid it if we can and just let someone else do it for us, aka, “themiddle schooler”. Still this was a great experience upon which I plan tobuild.References:Harlem Middle School. (2011). Unit 1 lesson plans, 8th Grade EnglishLanguage Arts. Columbia County School System. Evans, GA.National Governors Association and Council of State School Officers -Common Core State Standards Initiative:http://www.corestandards.org/the-standardshttp://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/genre-study-collaborative-approach-270.html
  10. 10. Harlem Middle School Coach Dolly and Mrs. L Print and answer these self-questions and turn-in with your bookmark and book review.Literature Genres Book Review - Student Self-Questions YES NO1. Does my bookmark and book review provide text-based detailsto support the particular characteristics of the genre that I read?2. Can I connect the text-based details of my bookmark and bookreview to genre characteristics with confidence and thus,synthesize the conclusion that I present efficiently?3. Does my visual representation of the Book Review meet thechecklist criteria?4. Did I ask for help when I needed it?5. Did I include proper citations for borrowed intellectual propertyreferenced in my Book Review visual?6. Have I completed all of the referenced activities in the wiki(bookmark, book review, self-questions print out, book reviewchecklist) prior to final submission7. Does my work include my name?8. Does my work include grammatically correct conventions?
  11. 11. Harlem Middle School Coach Dolly and Mrs. L Use this checklist to measure the quality of your Book Review visual representation.Literature Genres Book Review - Checklist Assessment YES NO1. Does my book review include the title, author, and genre of thebook that I have read? possible 3 pts.2. Have I provided specific text-based evidence details to supportthe book’s characters? (at least 2) possible 2 pts.3. Have I provided specific text-based evidence details to supportthe book’s setting (time/place)? (at least 2) possible 2 pts.4. Have I provided specific text-based evidence details to supportthe book’s major conflicts/problems? (at least 2) possible 2 pts.5. Have I provided specific text-based evidence details to supportthe book’s lesson/theme? (at least 1) possible 6 pts.6. Did I include at least 3 characteristics of the genre of my book inthe book review? possible 6 pts.7. Does my book review include my name? possible 1 pt.8. Does my work include grammatically correct conventions, ifapplicable? possible 3 pts.9. Have I demonstrated creativity in my presentation? possible 5 pts. total possible 30 pts.

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