

‘Poetry gives most pleasure when only generally
and not perfectly understood’
-S.T.Coleridge

 “We

do not sufficientl...
 The

ancient mariner frustrated
interpretation because it defected
expectation.
 For the romantics it appeared an
enigm...
 According

to C.M Bowra , the ancient
mariner is a tale of crime and
punishment.
 It falls into seven sections and each...
 The

first section tells of the
actual crime. The mariner kills
the bird out of anger or irritation.
 Therefore he suff...


The mariner begins to suffer punishment.



The ship has ceased to move, and the sailors are
tortured by thirst while ...
This section shows how the guilty soul becomes
conscious of what it has done.
 The mariner first begins to realize the co...
 The

sense of solitude is elaborated.
 Guilty soul is cut off not merely
merely from human intercourse but
from consoli...
 The

fifth section continues the
process of souls revival.
 The ship begins to move, and the
mariner hears heavenly mus...
 According

to psychoanalysts, the
mariner represents though peculiarly
the mother. He is an archetype, the
wise old man ...
 The

tale begins with a
unquestionable premise: there was
a ship.
 The vessel constitutes a basic
metaphor for the body...
 At

first the mariners only perceive
only a rhythm of natural variationthe rising and the setting of the sun.
 The rhyt...
 According

to psychoanalysts the
masculine and the feminine however
with both pleasant and unpleasant
sensations.
 The ...
 Life

in death is a recurrent theme in
Coleridge’s thought and it meant to
him a mixture of remorse and
loneliness.

At ...
psychoanalysis in the rime of ancient mariner
psychoanalysis in the rime of ancient mariner
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

psychoanalysis in the rime of ancient mariner

1,849 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,849
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

psychoanalysis in the rime of ancient mariner

  1. 1.  ‘Poetry gives most pleasure when only generally and not perfectly understood’ -S.T.Coleridge  “We do not sufficiently understand the story to analyze it” -Robert Southey
  2. 2.  The ancient mariner frustrated interpretation because it defected expectation.  For the romantics it appeared an enigma and a failure; its complexity was comfortably construed to be obscurity; its departure from conventional expectation where adjudged as defects and its
  3. 3.  According to C.M Bowra , the ancient mariner is a tale of crime and punishment.  It falls into seven sections and each sections tells of a new stage in the process.
  4. 4.  The first section tells of the actual crime. The mariner kills the bird out of anger or irritation.  Therefore he suffers the most.  Secondly, the crime is against nature.
  5. 5.  The mariner begins to suffer punishment.  The ship has ceased to move, and the sailors are tortured by thirst while the moving things in the hideous scene are the slimy creatures
  6. 6. This section shows how the guilty soul becomes conscious of what it has done.  The mariner first begins to realize the consequence of his actions. “Her lips were red, her looks were free, Her locks were yellow as gold. Her skin was white as leprosy, The nightmare life in death was she, Who thicks man’s blood with cold” 
  7. 7.  The sense of solitude is elaborated.  Guilty soul is cut off not merely merely from human intercourse but from consoling friendship of nature, which mocks it with majestic detachment.
  8. 8.  The fifth section continues the process of souls revival.  The ship begins to move, and the mariner hears heavenly music and is comforted by it.  In the sixth section, the mariner is still haunted by the presence of his dead comrades.
  9. 9.  According to psychoanalysts, the mariner represents though peculiarly the mother. He is an archetype, the wise old man whose hypnotic glittering eyes implies the Laccanian phallic gaze of simultaneous identity and alienation.
  10. 10.  The tale begins with a unquestionable premise: there was a ship.  The vessel constitutes a basic metaphor for the body beginning life.  The ship’s movement follows the pulsations and rhythms of fluid preoedipal drives.  In part one the mariner is passive.
  11. 11.  At first the mariners only perceive only a rhythm of natural variationthe rising and the setting of the sun.  The rhythm is disturbed by the storm blast which drives the vessel into the frozen Atlantic.  The sun and the storm are he while the moon is she.
  12. 12.  According to psychoanalysts the masculine and the feminine however with both pleasant and unpleasant sensations.  The father sun implies comforting regularity.  But the storm blasts, also male, is experienced as an abusive father.  The albatross connotes mother and father in both good and bad aspects.
  13. 13.  Life in death is a recurrent theme in Coleridge’s thought and it meant to him a mixture of remorse and loneliness. At the end, the life in death still haunts the mariner, and he says “since then at an uncertain hour, The agony returns and till my ghastly tale is told The heart within me burns”

×