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How to find your Topic, with resources & processes

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These slides are appropriate for Masters and Doctoral Students and the corresponding webinar will soon be available on the DoctoralNet Youtube channel.

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How to find your Topic, with resources & processes

  1. 1. Exploiting Rapid Change in Technology Enhanced Learning … for Post Graduate Education Designing Your Research Series: Topic Ideas - Resources and Processes
  2. 2. Goals 1. One of the more difficult parts of the research process can be finding and refining a topic 2. Librarians and others can help you through the process of brainstorming, exploring, and narrowing/broadening your topic! 3. You are developing an argument, best to understand the parts you need to put together 4. Your topic intersects with other portions of your research – understand those connections as well
  3. 3. Agenda 1. What makes it difficult? 2. The process of topic brainstorming, exploring, and narrowing/broadening your topic! 3. What makes an argument? 4. How your topic relates to the rest of your research
  4. 4. What makes it difficult?
  5. 5. Ambiguous or conflicting criteria Raise your hand if… 1. You don’t know quite what is required in a topic?
  6. 6. Ambiguous or conflicting criteria 1. A topic: 1. Should interest you 2. Should be able to be measured 3. Should be current in your field 2. When you read… 1. Try major journals in your field in the last year 2. Scan for topics that are of interest 3. Before you settle scan recent dissertations for the same keywords https://pqdtopen.proquest.com/search.html 4. Look at what they suggest in recommendations for future study 5. Talk your ideas out with others – the most important thing is that the ideas you like CAN BE MEASURED 3. You have shown others ideas only to have them dismissed but you didn’t quite understand why? 1. Go to your mastersnet or doctoralnet portal and do the self assessment for topic – go through all the criteria – then print the pdf and show it to the person who dismissed your ideas – it will help them be clear on the issues they think you are missing.
  7. 7. Criteria to consider 1. Is it interesting to others? 2. Does it generate theoretical contributions? 3. Does it generate practical contributions? 4. Is it clear who is associated to the topic? 5. Is it clear what specific aspect of the topic interests you? 6. Is it clear what location is associated to the topic? 7. Do you know what impact the topic may have? 8. Is it a hot topic in your field of study? 9. Can you identify a research method? 10. Can you identify a type of data for the topic? 11. Could you think of more than one possible result? 12. Do you have a strong background in the topic? 13. Can you study this topic within your own environment? 14. Do you need to get funds to complete this study? 15. Can the topic be measured/evaluated? 16. Are you sure the topic really interests you?
  8. 8. https://.................doctoralnet.com//how-to-choose-a-topic.html Tools
  9. 9. The process
  10. 10. Ambiguous or conflicting criteria 1. You have shown others ideas only to have them dismissed but you didn’t quite understand why? 2. You don’t know what to look for when you read?
  11. 11. https://............doctoralnet.com/phase-1/1-2-phd-research-topic-selected.html https://.............doctoralnet.com/home/coaching-from-kat.html Tools
  12. 12. Argumentation
  13. 13. Learn how to build an argument Has four parts: 1. Your claim 2. The evidence you have that this claim is true 3. The warrant or connection between the evidence and the claim 4. Your conclusion that because of all these your topic wil work
  14. 14. Criteria to consider 1. Is it interesting to others? 2. Does it generate theoretical contributions? 3. Does it generate practical contributions? 4. Is it clear who is associated to the topic? 5. Is it clear what specific aspect of the topic interests you? 6. Is it clear what location is associated to the topic? 7. Do you know what impact the topic may have? 8. Is it a hot topic in your field of study? 9. Can you identify a research method? 10. Can you identify a type of data for the topic? 11. Could you think of more than one possible result? 12. Do you have a strong background in the topic? 13. Can you study this topic within your own environment? 14. Do you need to get funds to complete this study? 15. Can the topic be measured/evaluated? 16. Are you sure the topic really interests you?
  15. 15. Resources to help you get across the chasm
  16. 16. Discussion….
  17. 17. Outside Resources Very basic but comfortingly simple: https://library.macewan.ca/research-how-tos/video- tutorials/history/finding_your_topic Like #4 on this list best – worth reading over to keep yourself going… http://www.mastersportal.eu/articles/996/fool-proof-tips-for-finding- phd-research-topics.html

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